Dyeing Easter Dinosaur Eggs without a Kit-- a "how to dye" with pics

dinosaur Easter egg in nest
dinosaur Easter egg in nest | Source

Dinosaur Eggs

I love coloring and decorating Easter eggs, I have many fond childhood memories of Easter and dyeing eggs. When I was a little girl, my mom would buy the kits that came with stickers and extra cute stuff that kept me busy. Now that I'm older, I don't buy the kits but I still dye Easter eggs with my husband. I'll show you how to make some beautiful eggs using items you probably have in your kitchen right now. It's super easy and the results are beautiful, so let's get to it.

hard-boiling my eggs in my kitchen
hard-boiling my eggs in my kitchen | Source

Ingredients

For these dinosaur eggs, I used the following ingredients:

  • hard-boiled eggs
  • hot water
  • vinegar
  • oil
  • food coloring*

*I used a standard set of food colors as well as a "neon" set.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
coloring eggs in mason jarsmy husband prepared all of our base colorspink dye & jar
coloring eggs in mason jars
coloring eggs in mason jars | Source
my husband prepared all of our base colors
my husband prepared all of our base colors | Source
pink dye & jar
pink dye & jar | Source

Items

You'll also need the following items:

  • jar or mug*
  • spoon or tongs
  • fork
  • pie plate or shallow dish
  • tablespoon for measuring
  • teaspoon for measuring
  • newspaper to protect your work area
  • pin board or egg carton for drying eggs
  • latex gloves unless you don't mind food-colored-fingers ;)

*I used mason jars purely to take some beautiful pictures. Use whatever you have that will allow you completely submerge your egg. You'll only need this item and follow this step if you want a base coat on your egg.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
close-up of oil blobspurple dye mix and green squirts in glass pyrex pie dishafter one pass (roll) on a plain white egg
close-up of oil blobs
close-up of oil blobs | Source
purple dye mix and green squirts in glass pyrex pie dish
purple dye mix and green squirts in glass pyrex pie dish | Source
after one pass (roll) on a plain white egg
after one pass (roll) on a plain white egg | Source
drying on an upside-down egg carton
drying on an upside-down egg carton | Source

Steps

  1. Prepare your jars with your desired colors. Food coloring usually has a color chart on the packaging, or you can experiment. I used a very helpful color wheel from a Martha Stewart egg coloring app that I have on my iPhone. In each mason jar, I used one cup of hot water and 1tsp of vinegar.
  2. If you want multicolored eggs, you can begin by submerging them until they are colored to your liking. This will be your base coat. Otherwise skip this step.
  3. Pour half of one of your color mixtures into a pieplate. Put a tablespoon (or more or less, to your liking) of oil (I used vegetable) in the plate with the colored water and vinegar. Use a fork to disperse your oil glob into many smaller oil globs.
  4. Place your egg in the pan and use your finger or a utensil to roll it around. Experiment rolling more and less and faster and slower. Results will vary. For more multicolored dimensions, add a few drops of another color right into the pie plate and roll your egg like before.

I let my eggs dry on top of an upside down egg carton. These eggs will be a little oily, so I like to wipe them off when they're done air drying. The oil actually gives them a nice shine, too.

All done!

Click thumbnail to view full-size
these dinosaur eggs have a base coatthese dinosaur eggs do not have a base coatdinosaur eggs in grass "That's not very scary. More like a six-foot Turkey."-- Jurassic Parkbe eggstra careful!dinosaur eggsdinosaur eggsdinosaur eggsjars of eggs in windowsill
these dinosaur eggs have a base coat
these dinosaur eggs have a base coat | Source
these dinosaur eggs do not have a base coat
these dinosaur eggs do not have a base coat | Source
dinosaur eggs in grass
dinosaur eggs in grass | Source
 "That's not very scary. More like a six-foot Turkey."-- Jurassic Park
"That's not very scary. More like a six-foot Turkey."-- Jurassic Park | Source
be eggstra careful!
be eggstra careful! | Source
dinosaur eggs
dinosaur eggs | Source
dinosaur eggs
dinosaur eggs | Source
dinosaur eggs
dinosaur eggs | Source
jars of eggs in windowsill
jars of eggs in windowsill | Source

Heather Says: This is a fantastic way to color eggs. The colors and designs are so rich that it looks like you spent money on one of those expensive kits. Use this how-to and skip the kits. You'll save money and you can boast that you did it "from scratch." You also have an almost infinite array of color combinations at your fingertips by using food coloring rather than the tabs that come in the kits. Have fun with this because no two eggs will be alike-- like snowflakes but dinosaur eggs instead!

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Comments 3 comments

Docmo profile image

Docmo 4 years ago from UK

Cool idea, simple tips, great result. what more can we want. Your pics to complement your hub are wonderful. well done!

BTW when you attribute your name under the photos, make sure you include your hubpages profile url on them- so when people click on this photo it will take them to your profile page on search engines. Daisy taught me this useful tip recently and it really helps traffic!


Heather Says profile image

Heather Says 4 years ago from Buckeye, Arizona Author

Awesome! Thanks. You're a food coloring wizard... I just saw your beautiful Easter donuts! Thanks for reading :)


moonlake profile image

moonlake 4 years ago from America

I never buy kits I always use my food coloring. Enjoyed your hub very beautiful eggs. Voted UP

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