FLAG DAY POEMS

FLAG DAY


Flag day will be celebrated by many families throughout the United States.

It is a time to remember the power of the U.S. Constitution, the rights for each citizen, promised in the Bill Of Rights, and the liberty and freedom set forth in the Declaration of Independence.

People will wave the flags high above their homes, businesses, schools, churches...sing songs about the flag, read about the flag, wear flag pins, buttons, earrings, t-shirts, jeans, hats... eat cake and cookies and ice cream decorated to look like the flag...

decorate their cars, trucks, SUV's, bikes and skateboards with flag banners, stickers, mini flags, even painting their vehicles red, white and blue...in honor of the preeminent meaning which the flag holds.

So come on, and join in the fun with the masses, and celebrate this annual holiday event.

Here are a few of my favorite flag day poems to help you enjoy this season.

THE PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

 

I Pledge Allegliance to the flag

of the United States of America 

and to the Republc for which it stands,

one nation under God,

indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

THE FLAG ON THE FARM

 

We've raised a flagpole on the farm

And flung Old Glory to the sky,

And It's another touch of charm

That seems to cheer the passer-by,

But more than that, no matter where

We're laboring in wood and field,

We turn and see it in the air,

Our promise of a greater yeild.

It whispers to us all day long,

From dawn to dusk: "Be true, be strong;

Who falters now with plow or hoe

Gives comfort to his country's foe."

It seems to me I've never tried

To do so much about the place,

Nor been so slow to come inside,

But since I've got the flag to face,

Each night when I come home to rest

I feel that I must look up there

And say: "Old flag I've done my best,

To-day I've tried to do my share."

And sometimes, just to catch the breeze,

I stop my work and o'er the trees

Old Glory fairly shouts my way:

"Your shirking far too much to-day!"

The help have caught the spirit, too;

The hired man takes off his cap

Before the old red, white and blue,

Then to the horses say: "giddap"

And starting bravely to the field

He tells the milkmaid by the door:

"We're going to make these acres yeild

More than they've ever done before."

She smiles to hear this gallant brag,

Then drops a curtsey to the flag.

And in her eyes there seems to shine

A patriotism that is fine.

We've raised a flagpole on the farm

And flung Old Glory to the sky;

We're far removed from war's alarm,

But courage here is runnibg high.

We're doing things we never dreamed

We'd ever find the time to do:

Deeds that impossible once seemed

Each morning now we hurry through.

The flag now waves above our toil

And sheds it's glory on the soil,

And boy and man looks up to it

As if to say "I'll do my bit!"

                                    Edgar A.Guest (1881-1959)

"Barbara Frietchie"

 

Up from the meadows rich with corn,
Clear in the cool September morn,
The clustered spires of Frederick stand
Green-walled by the hills of Maryland.

Round about them orchards sweep,
Apple and peach tree fruited deep,
Fair as the garden of the Lord
To the eyes of the famished rebel horde,

On that pleasant morn of early fall
When Lee marched over the mountain wall;
Over the mountains winding down,
Horse and foot, into Frederick town.

Forty flags with their silver stars
Forty flag with their crimson bars,
Flapped in the morning wind; the sun
Of noon looked down, and saw not one.

Up rose old Barbara Frietchie then,
Bowed with her fourscore years and ten;
Bravest of all in Frederick town,
She took up the flag the men hauled down;

In her attic window the staff she set,
To show that one heart was loyal yet.
Up the street came the rebel tread,
Stonewall Jackson riding ahead.

Under his slouched hat left and right
He glanced; the old flag met his sight.
"Halt!" - the dust-brown ranks stood fast.
"Fire!" - out blazed the rifle-blast.

It shivered the window, pane and sash;
It rent the banner with seam and gash.
Quick, as it fell, from the broken staff
Dame Barbara snatched the silken scarf.

She leaned far out on the window-sill,
And shook it forth with a royal will.
"Shoot, if you must, this old gray head,
But spare your country's flag," she said.

A shade of sadness, a blush of shame,
Over the face of the leader came;
The nobler nature within him stirred
To life at that woman's deed and word;

"Who touches a hair of yon gray head
Dies like a dog! March on!" he said.
All day long through Frederick street
Sounded the tread of marching feet;

All day long that free flag tost
Over the heads of the rebel host.
Ever its torn folds rose and fell
On the loyal winds that loved it well;

And through the hill-gaps sunset light
Shone over it with a warm good-night.
Barbara Frietchie's work is o'er,
And the Rebel rides on his raids no more.

Honor to her! and let a tear
Fall, for her sake, on Stonewall's bier.
Over Barbara Frietchie's grave,
Flag of Freedom and Union, wave!

Peace and order and beauty draw
Round thy symbol of light and law;
And ever the stars above look down
On thy stars below in Frederick town!

John Greenleaf Whittier (1807- 1892)

 

SHOW THE FLAG

 

Show the flag and let it wave

As a symbol of the brave;

Let it float upon the breeze

As a sign for each who sees

That beneath it, where it rides,

Loyalty to-day abides.

 

Show the flag and signify

That it wasn't born to die;

Let its colors speak for you

That you still are standing true,

True in sight of God and man

To work that flag began.

 

Show the flag that all may see

That you serve humanity.

Let it whisper to the breezse

That comes singing through the trees

That whatever storms descend

You'll be faithful to the end.

 

Show the flag and let it fly,

Cheering every passer-by.

Men that may have stepped aside,

May have lost their old-time pride,

May behold it there, and then,

Consecrate themselves again.

 

Show the flag!  The day is gone

When men blindly hurry on

Serving only gods of gold;

Now the spirit that was cold

Warms again to courage fine.

Show the flag and fall in line!

Edgar A. Guest

 

CALL ME OLD GLORY


Call me Old Glory,

Or Stars and Stripes.

This Star Spangled Banner

Must flow all night.

I must fly high amongst the hillside,

Low amongst the grass

Touching every heart string,

Without hitting the grounds I pass.

I must feel the breeze

Go through me

Go around

Up and below,

Feel the freedom I stand for,

To channel it below.

I must hear the calls for freedom

Wipe the tears that flow,

Strenghten the badges of courage

Of those men and women we know,

Who fight for right and justice

Who toil for honors sake

Who represent this flag

For this United States.

D. Alsup

More by this Author


Comments

No comments yet.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working