How to Celebrate Nowruz New Year on March 21

Welcome to the First Day of Spring!

Nowruz marks the beginning of the Spring season in the Northern hemisphere of our earth. After a cold Winter, during which the earth lies dormant, Spring brings sunshine, warmth, rain and flowers - reawakening the earth. Day and Night are of equal length all over the earth. This is the time of the energy of growth, of emerging, of moving forward with excitement and joy.

What is Nowruz?

Since ancient times, people of many different regions and religions have celebrated the beginning of spring as the beginning of the New Year. In Persia, they celebrated Nowruz, which is a Persian word meaning “new day.”

This beautiful spring flower is in the Eram Garden, also known as Bagh-é Eram (Garden of Paradise) a famous historic Persian garden in Shiraz, Iran.
This beautiful spring flower is in the Eram Garden, also known as Bagh-é Eram (Garden of Paradise) a famous historic Persian garden in Shiraz, Iran. | Source

It is the first day of the year and as such begins the Persian calendar on the vernal equinox, which is usually on March 21 on the Gregorian calendar. This is when the sun is directly over the equator, causing both the north and south hemispheres to have an equal amount of sunlight. Persians looks at this as a day when the bull and the lion have equal strength.

This is an ancient holiday that has been celebrated for more than three thousand years, and has spread throughout the world.

Even though it is sometimes known as the Persian New Year, it unites people from many different regions and nationalities, religions and languages as they share in the renewal of life on the first day of Spring. People from China, Turkey, Iran, India, Tajikistan, Syria, Canada, the United States, and many other countries throughout the world celebrate Nowruz.

Because of the many cultures that celebrate it, the name of this holiday has several different pronunciations and spellings. Navroz, Nuvroz, Nouruz, and Navroj are just some of the many possible spellings and those are just the ones that use the English alphabet!

International Day of Nowruz

Nowruz was added in 2009 to UNESCO’s Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, which has led the United Nations General Assembly to declare March 21as the International Day of Nowruz in 2010.

A technicolor rainbow of poultry on sale outside the front steps of Kashan's Bazaar before the Iranian New Year (Nowruz) holiday.
A technicolor rainbow of poultry on sale outside the front steps of Kashan's Bazaar before the Iranian New Year (Nowruz) holiday. | Source

How is Nowruz celebrated?

This great festival has been celebrated in many cultures throughout the world for many millennia, as it is tied to the Spring Equinox.

Nowruz is a day for family and friends, for festive meals, for dancing and singing. It is a day to celebrate the value of mutual respect and the aspiration for harmony held by all societies. It is a moment for cleansing and rebirth, the time to renew wishes of peace and goodwill.

A Nowruz feast
A Nowruz feast | Source

People participate in spring cleaning, and buy new clothes for the occasion. They wear their new clothes on Nowruz. Many countries make it a public holiday. Some countries even have the holiday extend for a total of four days.

On the first day, they set tables and share wheat, sweets, cloves, fruits, nuts and other items which symbolize strength, abundance, happiness, love, life, and good health. During the rest of the season, During the holiday season, they visit the elders in the family, and then their family and friends. Some of them also hold parties.

There is a parade in New York city. Dances and events are also held for the holiday.

As with the New Year on January 1, some people believe that what you do on Nowruz will affect the rest of the year. They avoid fighting and bickering on that day, and try to remove bad habits and start positive new ones.

Navroz is a time for affirming positive wishes, of planting seeds of hope for the future. They offer their prayers and gratitude for past successes as well as seek blessings for success in the New Year.

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Comments: "Celebrate Nowruz New Year on March 21" 8 comments

Millionaire Tips profile image

Millionaire Tips 3 years ago from USA Author

Happy Nowruz to you Era!


era 3 years ago

happy,happy novruz for everyone


Millionaire Tips profile image

Millionaire Tips 4 years ago from USA Author

Thank you Peggy, Donna, and Aurelio.

Peggy, Rain is a wonderful thing for the drought and the spring flowers. I'm glad you got it.

Donna, The chicks are amazing. I am glad I found that photo.

Aurelio, I hope you do find some celebrations that you can attend. It is a great cultural experience.


alocsin profile image

alocsin 4 years ago from Orange County, CA

We have a large Persian community and I'm surprised that I've heard nothing about this. Need to find any local celebrations -- sounds like a worthwhile holiday to celebrate. Voting this Up and Interesting.


DonnaCosmato profile image

DonnaCosmato 4 years ago from USA

Wow, what an interesting holiday! I've never heard of this but I'm glad to know more about it, and I agree with ytsenoh - those rainbow colored chicks are out of this world. Excellent hub, which I voted up and shared - Happy New Year's!


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

I was unfamiliar with the term Nowruz but now, thanks to you, I know what it is. Our first day of Spring was a washout in Houston. It rained most of the day, but I am not complaining. We are still catching up from the extreme drought of last year. Voted interesting and useful. Thanks!


Millionaire Tips profile image

Millionaire Tips 4 years ago from USA Author

Thank you ytsenoh. We don't hear very much about Nowruz here in the states, but it is celebrated by so many people worldwide. Yes, I think that those chicks ARE real. Isn't that incredible!


ytsenoh profile image

ytsenoh 4 years ago from Louisiana, Idaho, Kauai, Nebraska, South Dakota, Missouri

I gave you thumbs up because you clearly defined Nowruz, plus teach me about a term and event I've not heard of before. Interestingly, the image you had of the colored chicks for sale, were they real? It's amazing what we learn about in the Hubs! Thanks much for the lesson.

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