Rosh Hashanah - Apples and Honey For A Sweet New Year

"Rosh Hashanah," commonly known as the Jewish New Year

Sweet, Joyful, Inspiring, Meaningful, Fun Healthy and Happy New Year.
Sweet, Joyful, Inspiring, Meaningful, Fun Healthy and Happy New Year.

Rosh Ha Shana

The Jewish New Year

The 2013 Jewish Calendar dates for the first High Holiday:

Rosh Hashanah 2013 begins in the evening of Wednesday, September 4 and ends in the evening of Friday, September 6


New Years Greeting

"Leshana tova tekatev v'etachetem- May you be inscribed for a good year!"

The Shofar On Rosh Hashana

The name "Rosh Hashanah" is not used in the Bible to discuss this holiday. The Bible refers to the holiday as Yom Ha-Zikkaron (the day of remembrance) or Yom Teruah (the day of the sounding of the shofar). The holiday is instituted in Leviticus 23:24
The name "Rosh Hashanah" is not used in the Bible to discuss this holiday. The Bible refers to the holiday as Yom Ha-Zikkaron (the day of remembrance) or Yom Teruah (the day of the sounding of the shofar). The holiday is instituted in Leviticus 23:24

The Jewish New Year

Rosh Hashana

Rosh Hashanah occurs on the first and second days of Tishri. In Hebrew, Rosh Hashanah means, literally, "head of the year" or "first of the year." Rosh Hashanah also marks the beginning of the Ten Days of Repentance, which finish at the end of Yom Kippur.

Rosh Hashanah is commonly known as the Jewish New Year. This name is somewhat deceptive, because there is little similarity between Rosh Hashanah, one of the holiest days of the year, and the American midnight drinking bash and daytime football game.

It is on this day that we celebrate the anniversary of the creation of Adam and Eve. It is a day of judgment and coronation and its central observance is the sounding of the shofar. It is the shofar, the rams horn that represents the blast of the trumpet. Altogether, it is customary to hear 100 shofar blasts including tekiot, shevarim and teruot.

Rosh Ha Shana - Jewish New Year
Rosh Ha Shana - Jewish New Year

Rosh HaShana Wishes

May the joyful sound of the shofar welcome in a new year of Health Happiness Laughter and Love.
May the joyful sound of the shofar welcome in a new year of Health Happiness Laughter and Love.

How Do We Observe Rosh HaShana

No work is permitted on Rosh Hashanah. Much of the day is spent in synagogue, where the regular daily liturgy is somewhat expanded. In fact, there is a special prayerbook called the machzor used for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur because of the extensive liturgical changes for these holidays.

Leshana tova tekatev v'etachetem- May you be inscribed for a good year!"
Leshana tova tekatev v'etachetem- May you be inscribed for a good year!"
May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year.
May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year.

"Hayom Harat Olam"

Through Teshuvah - return to the right path, working toward reconciliation, asking for forgiveness and granting it,

Through Tefilah - the deep connection with G-d with a open and humble heart and allowing some light to seep in

ThroughTzedakah - acts of fairness toward our fellow human beings devoting oneself to justice, dignity and peace in our world.

Days Of Awe - Yamim Noraim

ימים נוראים‎

The Days Of Remembrance

The High Holidays also known as the Days of Awe is the perfect time for us to look back at the past year, our deeds, our mistakes and our missed opportunities.

During this time the theme of the Days of Awe is that G-d in his bookkeeping writes our names. It is written that who will live and who will die, who will have a good life and who will have it bad. These books are written in on Rosh Hashana but we have 10 days to alter that decision. The actions that can change this decree are repentance, prayer and good deeds.

These books are sealed on Yom Kippur.

An so today is the birth of something completely new.

L'Shanah Tova

Have A Sweet New Year
Have A Sweet New Year

The Days of Awe

An accounting of our souls
An accounting of our souls

An Accounting of The Soul

During the Days of Awe

Judaism has a term for true self­ contemplation: heshbon hanefesh. And so as the new year is about to begin we take an Accounting of the Soul.

Questions to ponder and ask ourselves are:

  • Who am I?
  • Have I let my insecurities, my self doubt stifle me?
  • Where am I in my life?
  • Have I become so hard that I am cold to the people around me?
  • What relationships am I in that diminish my dignity?
  • Have I let myself love?
  • Have I let others love me?
  • What pain have I caused?
  • What potential do I have?
  • Has my year been marked brokenness or wholeness?
  • Do I live my life in distrust or faith?

Change and Balance

These questions can lead us to find balance, which is the act of thinking, analyzing, and drawing conclusions with regard to one’s own actions and those of a collective.

Without this act, there is no possibility for change, and change is a central concept of the Days of Awe.

Leshana tova tekatev v'etachetem- May you be inscribed for a good year!"
Leshana tova tekatev v'etachetem- May you be inscribed for a good year!"

Taslich

the custom on Rosh Hashanah to cast off our sins in a body of flowing water
the custom on Rosh Hashanah to cast off our sins in a body of flowing water

Taslich

A Rosh Hashanah Custom

On the first day of the 2 days that Rosh hashana is observed, Taslich is what many Jews practice. The Rosh Hashanah custom of Tashlich is first mentioned in the Book of the Prophet Nehemiah, where it is written: "All the Jews gathered as one in the street that is in front of the gate of water."

Tashlich, which literally means casting off.  And so we walk to a body of flowing water and throw pieces of bread into the water. The bread is a symbolic representation of one's sins, and in essence what we are doing is casting off our sins in preparation for a more pure year to come.

It is preferable to do Taslich by a body of water that has fish.

The Symbollism of Taslich

In Jewish mysticism we read that the water corresponds to the attribute of kindness. On Rosh Hashanah, we beseech G-d to treat us with kindness during the new year.

We walk to a body of water that has fish. For it is preferable to do Tashlich by water that has fish, for fish are not subject to the “evil eye”. Also interesting to think how it is that fish do not have eyelids, and so their eyes are always open. This symbolizes that nothing can be hidden from G-d. And just as fish may be caught in a fisherman’s net, so, too, we are caught in the net of judgment. This awareness hopefully helps to awaken us to be the best we can be and ask for forgiveness for our failings.

Fish also symbolize our hope to be fruitful and multiply like they do.

We throw our sins to the water so that the evil eye shall not affect us, just as it cannot affect the fish that are hidden under the water and we can get courage and hope through faith in G-d, for just like the fish like G-d never sleeps.

Leshana tova tekatev v'etachetem- May you be inscribed for a good year!"
Leshana tova tekatev v'etachetem- May you be inscribed for a good year!"

Apples Dipped in Honey

for a sweet New Year
for a sweet New Year

Apples Dipped in Honey

One of my favorite part of celebrating and observing Rosh Hashana is that we dip apples into honey. Jewish holidays are always full of symbolizime and the apples and honey are a symbol of our wishes for a sweet new year. It's yummy tradition and we also dip bread in honey (instead of the usual practice of sprinkling salt on it) at this time of year for the same reason.

Leshana tova tekatev v'etachetem- May you be inscribed for a good year!"
Leshana tova tekatev v'etachetem- May you be inscribed for a good year!"

The Shofar

Rosh Hashanah, the anniversary of our creation, it is up to us to ensure that everything continues.
Rosh Hashanah, the anniversary of our creation, it is up to us to ensure that everything continues.

Rosh Hashana Greeting L'shanah tovah

"For A Good Year"

The traditional way to greet someone is This is a shortening of "L'shanah tovah tikatev v'taihatem" (or to women, "L'shanah tovah tikatevi v'taihatemi"), which means "May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year." More on that concept at Days of Awe.

Rosh Hashanah will occur

On the following days of the Gregorian calendar:

  • Jewish Year 5771: sunset September 8, 2010 - nightfall September 10, 2010
  • Jewish Year 5772: sunset September 28, 2011 - nightfall September 30, 2011
  • Jewish Year 5773: sunset September 16, 2012 - nightfall September 18, 2012
  • Jewish Year 5774: sunset September 4, 2013 - nightfall September 6, 2013

Leshana tova tekatev v'etachetem- May you be inscribed for a good year!"
Leshana tova tekatev v'etachetem- May you be inscribed for a good year!"

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Comments 18 comments

Wendy Krick profile image

Wendy Krick 6 years ago from Maryland

I love Apples with Honey. That is a great holiday tradition.


tony0724 profile image

tony0724 6 years ago from san diego calif

Shari wanted to take a moment to wish you the best during the High Holy Days !


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY Author

The apples and honey is my favorite part of this holiday, and I am trying to fill up on them so that next week when it is time to fast maybe it will keep me full! Thanks for stopping by:)


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY Author

@Wendy The apples and honey is my favorite part of this holiday, and I am trying to fill up on them so that next week when it is time to fast maybe it will keep me full! Thanks for stopping by:)

@Tony - thanks for the Holiday wishes :)))))


Jai Warren profile image

Jai Warren 6 years ago from Dallas, Deep Ellum, Texas

I had no idea you were doing a Rosh Hashanah Hub when we tweeted on the birdie site. You give so much insight into Jewish tradition, that I appreciate and admire. Thanks Shari...enjoy the holy days! Ciao.


Dobson profile image

Dobson 6 years ago from Virginia

Thanks for explaining this holdiay as those of us outside the faith have no idea for what it is intended.


anglnwu profile image

anglnwu 6 years ago

L'Shanah tovah! Wishing the best, the sweetest new year! I love your clear explaination and your wonderful visuals. I love apples dipped in honey too. Awesome hub and enjoy SD.


drbj profile image

drbj 6 years ago from south Florida

"L'shanah tovah tikatevi v'taihatemi," Shari, and thank you for the beautiful explanation accompanied by very creative graphics.


Dave Mathews profile image

Dave Mathews 6 years ago from NORTH YORK,ONTARIO,CANADA

Wavegirl22: Thank you for explaining this Jewish High Feast Celebration. Since Jesus was a Jew, I guess that would make me Jewish too, Shalom!


kaltopsyd profile image

kaltopsyd 6 years ago from Trinidad originally, but now in the USA

Thank you for all the info, Shari. I learned a lot of new things although I was pretty familiar with it (I have a few Jewish friends). You explained it so well. Thanks again.


ReuVera profile image

ReuVera 6 years ago from USA

Shari, you made it! No feeling guilty any more :)

Great hub. Voted up and linked to my Rosh Hashana hub. I love the pictures too.

Shana Tova Umetuka lach ve lecol hamishpaha!

Gmar hatima tova!


glendoncaba profile image

glendoncaba 6 years ago from Somewhere in the hubverse

Thanks for wonderful read.


Robert 6 years ago

"L'shanah tovah tikatevi v'taihatemi," Shari


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY Author

@jai - it is always a pleasure to share the many holidays on the calender with you


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY Author

dobson, sending you lots of honey for a happy new year!


btrbell profile image

btrbell 4 years ago from Mesa, AZ

Great, great, comprehensive hub! Thank you!


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 4 years ago from New York, NY Author

btrbell - and a healthy and happy New Year to you and yours. May your new year be as sweet as the apples dipped in honey!


btrbell profile image

btrbell 4 years ago from Mesa, AZ

Thank you wavegirl and to and yours, as well! Only good things!

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