Yom Kippur - The Day of Atonement

5774 Yom Kippur 2013

Yom Kippur 2013 begins in the evening of Friday, September 13 and ends in the evening of Saturday, September 14
Yom Kippur 2013 begins in the evening of Friday, September 13 and ends in the evening of Saturday, September 14

Words for Yom Kippur

To those I have wronged, I ask forgivness. To those I have helped, I wish I had done more. To those I have neglected to help, I ask for understanding.  To those who helped me, I sincerely thank you... Shabbat Shalom and Gmar Chatima Tova. May we all
To those I have wronged, I ask forgivness. To those I have helped, I wish I had done more. To those I have neglected to help, I ask for understanding. To those who helped me, I sincerely thank you... Shabbat Shalom and Gmar Chatima Tova. May we all

Yom Kippur - 2013 - September 13

 Yom Kippur 2013 begins in the evening of Friday, September 13
Yom Kippur 2013 begins in the evening of Friday, September 13

Yom Kippur

The Day Of Atonement

(Leviticus 16:29 and 23:27)

This is the most solemn day of the year. For nearly twenty-six hours – from several minutes before sunset on Tishrei 9 until after nightfall on Tishrei 10 Jews abstain from food and drink as we "afflict our souls". Just like the angels who have no physical needs this is a time to take our focus off of the physical .

We Fast on

the 10th Day of the 7th Month?

Yom Kippur is called the 'Sabbath of Sabbaths' and in Hebrew it is Shabbat Shabbatot. It is during this shabbat that the last meal eaten before Jews all over the world begin a complete fast.

On the 9th day of Tishrei, in the late afternoon we eat the feast that precedes the fast. On the tenth day of the seventh month (Tishrei) the Torah calls this the day of for self affliction. This fast meal must be eaten before Sunset. And after that everyone except children under 13 and sick persons will fast until after sunset on the following day.

For in fasting we withhold from life's pleasures and concentrate on the one task of this day and that is repentance. It is a solemn day and a day to focus and to connect to who and why we are here.

the services on Yom Kippur
the services on Yom Kippur

Kol Nidre

The Opening Prayer on

Yom Kippur Eve

Before leaving for synagogue to hear Kol Nidre,  on this holy night there is an old custom where parents say a special prayer for their children.


"May your lips speak the truth and your hands do good deeds. May you be inscribed for a long and happy life. "

Kol Nidrei: (lit. "all the vows") solemn prayer opening the evening service of Yom Kippur

The Service on Yom Kippur

Services on Yom Kippur

Every day of the year there are three prayers in the course of the day — Maariv (the evening prayer), Shacharit (the morning prayer) and Mincha (the afternoon prayer). On Shabbat and every other Jewish holiday we have a fourth — Mussaf (the additional prayer). But only on Yom Kippur is there a fifth — Ne’ilah and on Yom Kippur there are five prayer services:

1) Maariv with its solemn Kol Nidrei service, on the eve of Yom Kippur

2) Shacharit —the morning prayer

3) Musaf - which includes a detailed account of the Yom Kippur Temple service

4) Minchah - which includes the reading of the Book of Jonah.

5) Neilah ("locking") prayer - Probably the most powerful moment of the year for this is when our souls can access the 5th dimension. And we ask, “Mah anu, What are we?”, “Meh chayeinu What are our lives?” It is at this moment that the gates of heaven remain wide open to accept our prayers bringing us to the climax of Yom Kippur.

The Kol Nidre Prayer

When the sun goes down, everyone returns to synagogue. The Torahs are taken out of the Holy Ark. The cantor rises and begins the famous Kol Nidre prayer in a chant that is known all around the world. It is quite impressing to know that Jews all around the world are going to hear the same prayer. And so, three times the cantor chants the prayer . . . . . . .

Kol means all and Nidre means vows.

Important to note that Kol Nidrei, is not really a prayer at all, but rather a statement.


We Remember on Yom Kippur

Kol Nidrei: Our song of memory - Kol nidrei, v’esarei, v’charamei, v’konamei,  v’chinuyei, v’kinusei ush’vuot.
Kol Nidrei: Our song of memory - Kol nidrei, v’esarei, v’charamei, v’konamei, v’chinuyei, v’kinusei ush’vuot.

Kol Nidrei

Our Song of Memory

WE REMEMBER
Like no other prayer,
Kol Nidrei compels our presence,
And not just us alone,
But the memorized outline, too, of younger years,
The gentle feel of those who tucked us in, who blessed our
days, consoled our nights;
And came as we do, on this eve, with memories of their own.
We, tonight, are memories in the making,
Warming seats for others who will remember us
In some Kol Nidrei they shall hear when we are gone.

Present too among us are memories more recent,
Of what we did, or said, or were, or weren’t,
Since last year at this time.
Of what we learned or lost;
Of kisses that we gave or got;
The laugh that lovers recognize.
The days of empty wandering,
And wondering
Where God was.
Or knowing with compelling certainty
That God was with us
Even in despair.
Kol Nidrei harbors memory of all this.
Its melody persists, insists,
Commands;
And summons our acknowledgment of time.
What we recall of others past,
And what we vow to leave behind
For others still to come,
who will remember us.
We kindle this memorial light
For those we loved, and those we lost,
For all we miss from the year now gone.

Yiskor - the Memorial Prayer
Yiskor - the Memorial Prayer

A Day on the Jewish Calender To Remember

Yom Kippur - One of Days Of Awe on the Jewish calender
Yom Kippur - One of Days Of Awe on the Jewish calender

Yiskor

Yom Kippur Memorial Prayer

In Judaism when we mourn for the dead it is both usually a private thing and privately when we observe, it is called a yahrzeit. A yahrzeit marks the anniversary of a person's death.

But on Yom Kippur part of the religious service to remember the dead and so a memorial prayer is said publicly. This service is called Yiskor. Recited by the congregation during holidays on the Jewish calender. Yom Kippur is one of the 4 holidays in which Yiskor is said. The holidays in which Jewish people say Yiskor are on:,

  • The eighth day of Sukkot, Shenini Atzeret,
  • The last day of Passover
  • The second day of Shavuot
  • Yom Kippur

The soul of the dead which is being mourned is mentioned it is based on Jewish belief that the soul lives on forever. The main part of Yizkor is a single paragraph which begins . . .
Yizkor elohim
(may G-d remember).

On Yom Kippur

the book of Jonah
the book of Jonah

The Prophet - Book of Jonah

Jonah is read from the Book of the Prophets on Yom Kippur
Jonah is read from the Book of the Prophets on Yom Kippur

Reading Jonah

On Yom Kippur

In the afternoon , the portion of the prophets which is read is the Book of Jonah. In this story Jonah we read how no matter how hard we may try to escape G-d , truth be that God is everywhere.

In Judaism it is the Haftarah that is being read during the afternoon services of Yom Kippur because it is a story of God's willingness to forgive those who repent.

Repentance

A Day of Atonement

As the day wears on, more and more we see that the central message of Yom Kippur is to forgive and to repent.

In Hebrew the word teshuvah means to "return and it is used to refer to "repentance". And it is represented by two verbs: שוב shuv (to return) and נחם nicham (to feel sorrow).

Yom Kippur a Day of Forgiveness

"On Yom Kippur, the power of the [physical] inclination is muted. Therefore, one's yearning for spiritual elevation reasserts itself, after having lain dormant as a result of sin's deadening effect on the soul. This rejuvenation of purpose entitles a person to special consideration and forgiveness."
~ Rabbi Eliyahu Dessler ~

Ne'ilah

On Yom Kippur

The last service in synagogue on the day of atonement is called Ne'ilah which means to close.

At the very end of the service, we listen for the long awaited last sound of the shofar to blow. It is the one and only time that the shofar is blown on Yom Kippur. And if you listen carefully it is the last note that is a long and steady blow. It is as long as the breathe can hold out. And with that final blow, the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur is over. Everyone is anxious to eat as the fast is over. The meal that we have is called "break fast', which is a light usually dairy - bagles and lox type of meal. And so,

The High Holidays are over.

Yom Kippur Memorial

The Jewish Quarter, Radom

A memorial to the Jews of Radom: "To the Jews of Radom, Martyrs of the Hitlerian Crimes (photographs contributed by Hanka & Menachem Lior). From :http://www.zchor.org/radom/radom.htm
A memorial to the Jews of Radom: "To the Jews of Radom, Martyrs of the Hitlerian Crimes (photographs contributed by Hanka & Menachem Lior). From :http://www.zchor.org/radom/radom.htm

A Memorial to Radom

The Jewish Quarter

By Celina Holckener

The Jewish Quarter was written by the late Celina Holckener in the years 1940-41 in Radom. Celina was deported in August 1942 to Treblinka and she died there August 1942. Her poem was recalled and translated from Polish by her cousin Hanka Szolowicz-Lior. And it was submitted by Hanka and Menachem Lior.

And in memory of the village of Radom, Poland, and Celina Holckener who left this behind so we will always remember.

Radom, We will remember always and never forget!

The Jewish Year

http://www.torahtots.com
http://www.torahtots.com

Calendar for the Jewish Year

Hebrew Calendar

The Jewish calendar date begins at sundown of the night beforehand. The exception to this rule is fast days, which begin at dawn of the date shown below (except for Tisha b'Av and Yom Kippur which also begin the night before). The dates on the Jewish calendar are over at nightfall.

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Comments 22 comments

samsons1 profile image

samsons1 6 years ago from Tennessee

up & beautiful! Thank you for explaining this most High and Holy holiday...


Wendy Krick profile image

Wendy Krick 6 years ago from Maryland

Thanks for sharing this holiday with us. I learned a lot about Yom Kippur.


Boomer60 profile image

Boomer60 6 years ago

This is a great overview of Yom Kippur! I have never read anything on this before. Totally informative. Definitely voted it up!


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 6 years ago from United States

This is a very interesting hub. I knew part of the story but you completed it. Thanks. Rated up!


gr82bme profile image

gr82bme 6 years ago from USA

My mom worked for a family that were Jewish and during that time of year my mom would have to do alot for them. She even had to answer the phone. Great hub. Will rate up


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY Author

samsons1 - The High Holidays are the most special time, times for sharing with me.


Jai Warren profile image

Jai Warren 6 years ago from Dallas, Deep Ellum, Texas

Shari, I have many Jewish friends, but I've never really understood the meanings of your Holy Days. Until your Hubs! Thanks for giving us incite into these special times. And, for being a true friend. All the best, Ciao!


livelonger profile image

livelonger 6 years ago from San Francisco

Great hub! I just discovered it today, naturally, being better fed now. :-)

I lived in Radom for 3 months at the start of my Peace Corps service, so it was nice to see a memorial dedicated in this city.

G'mar hatima tova!


LeanMan profile image

LeanMan 6 years ago from At the Gemba

Thanks for the explanation, they don't seem to be observing this day here in Saudi, but amazing how it coincides with their eid holiday.


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY Author

Jai - always nice that I get to share all the Jewish holidays with you. Someday we are going to cook one of the special meals that tradition calls for :)


Dave Mathews profile image

Dave Mathews 6 years ago from NORTH YORK,ONTARIO,CANADA

Yom Kippur, The Holy Day of Atonement for your sins, shold be a very solemn day of reflection of ones past sins and a day to ask God for forgiveness.

Brother Dave.


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY Author

@Wendy Krick - Yom Kippur is an interesting Holiday and I am glad that you shared it with me !


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY Author

Boomer60 - it is one of those holidays on the Jewish calendar that really makes you think deep!


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY Author

@pamela - it is a story that has a beginning but no ending. Rosh Hashana always a special time. Even more so for you sharing it with me!


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY Author

gr82bme - Observant Jewish people do not turn the lights (among many other things they abstain from) so they usually have someone help them, that is so nice to hear that your mom was one of them!


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY Author

livelonger- when I read your comment I was stopped in my tracks. Chills up my spine to be honest. For I had never heard of Radom, and I have read so much on the Holocaust. And when I came across it I just had to put it in this Hub. Coincidence . . hmmmm...or do we both have a connection to Radom and Hubpages. Thank you so very much for sharing this with me.

Shana Tova my friend:)


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY Author

@leanman- i am trusting you to make peace in the middle east especially at this time when all should be thank you and feel blessed for being alive. I know I am for having the luck to have met you here. Happy New Year you little devil.


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY Author

@Dave Mathews - yes that is what Yom Kippur is all about - A time to reflect!


ghost whisper 77 5 years ago

I found you through a search here on the hubs, another had directed me to you through their hub. I am not Jewish, I am Christian. I was praying a day ago and Jesus clearly said these words to me. "Shalom Sinai." What does this mean? I thought that maybe you could help me to understand this.


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 5 years ago from New York, NY Author

ghost whisper - so glad you landed here . .Shalom which in this sense I am saying Hello to you. I believe that the words "Shalom Sinai" would translate to "Peace" meaning to be safe or complete. Shalom is a word that takes on many different meanings. When Jews welcome in the sabbath you will people greeting one another by saying "Shabbat Shalom. So as you can see it is a wonderful word. and may peace reign down on Sinai and all over the world.

Shalom!


livelonger profile image

livelonger 5 years ago from San Francisco

A great re-read, wavegirl22. Have you heard Johnny Mathis's Kol Nidre? It's really beautiful. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30HKyLhGCjk


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 5 years ago from New York, NY Author

LiveLonger - What an incredible rendition of Kol Nidre. Thank you so much for sharing this. You always turn me on to the best of the best!

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