Online Gift Ideas For Easter Greetings Cards And Eggs

Buy Online Easter Eggs Greetings Cards and Learn The Traditions of Easter Eggs:

Easter is a movable feast, meaning it is not fixed in relation to the civil calendar. The First Council of Nicaea established the date of Easter as the first Sunday after the full moon (the Paschal Full Moon) following the March equinox. Ecclesiasti
Easter is a movable feast, meaning it is not fixed in relation to the civil calendar. The First Council of Nicaea established the date of Easter as the first Sunday after the full moon (the Paschal Full Moon) following the March equinox. Ecclesiasti | Source

Celebrate Easter with Chocolate Easter Eggs

Easter eggs are special eggs that are often given to celebrate Easter or springtime.

Therefore, Easter eggs are common during the season of Eastertide. The oldest tradition is to use dyed and painted chicken eggs, but a modern custom is to substitute these with chocolate eggs, or plastic eggs filled with confectionery.

Easter is a Christian religious holiday. Some Easter traditions, such as Easter eggs are linked to pagan traditions. The egg is an ancient symbol of new life. It has been associated with pagan festivals celebrating spring.

Easter eggs and The Resurrection of Jesus

From a Christian perspective, Easter eggs are said to represent the emergence of Jesus from the tomb and the resurrection.

Easter falls in the spring, the yearly time of renewal, when the earth renews itself after a long, cold winter. The word Easter comes to us from the Norsemen's Eostur, Eastar, Ostara, and Ostar, and the pagan Goddess Eostre, all of which involve the season of the growing Sun and New Birth.

Easter Traditions

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Easter Customs

The meaning of the many different customs observed during Easter Sunday has been buried with time. Their origins lie in both pre-Christian religions and Christianity. In one way or another all the customs are a salute to spring marking re-birth.

Today on Easter Sunday, many children wake up to find that the Easter Bunny has left them baskets of Chocolate Easter eggs and he has also hidden the eggs that they decorated earlier that week.

Children hunt for the eggs all around the house. Neighbourhoods, friends and family hold Easter egg hunts, and the child who finds the most eggs wins a prize.

The Easter Bunny

The Easter Bunny (also called the Easter Rabbit or Easter Hare) is a character depicted as a rabbit bringing Easter eggs. Originating among German Lutherans, the Easter Hare originally played the role of a judge, evaluating whether children were good
The Easter Bunny (also called the Easter Rabbit or Easter Hare) is a character depicted as a rabbit bringing Easter eggs. Originating among German Lutherans, the Easter Hare originally played the role of a judge, evaluating whether children were good | Source

The Easter Bunny Legend

The first Easter Bunny legend was documented in the 1500s. By 1680, the first story about a rabbit laying eggs and hiding them in a garden was published. These legends were brought to the United States in the 1700s, when German immigrants settled in Pennsylvania Dutch country, according to the Centre for Children's Literature and Culture.

The tradition of making nests for the rabbit to lay its eggs in soon followed. Eventually, nests became decorated baskets and colourful eggs were swapped for candy, treats and other small gifts.

The White House Easter Egg Hunt

The History of the Easter Bunny

The Easter Bunny is sometimes depicted with clothes. In legend, the creature carries coloured eggs in his basket, candy and sometimes also toys to the homes of children, and as such shows similarities to Santa Claus, as they both bring gifts to children on the night before their respective holiday.

The custom was first mentioned in Georg Franck von Franckenau's De ovis paschalibus(About Easter Eggs) in 1682, referring to a German tradition of an Easter Hare bringing Easter Eggs for the children. In many church services on Easter Sunday, a live rabbit representing the Easter Bunny is brought into the congregation, especially for the children's message.

Easter Greetings Cards

The tradition of sending Easter postcards to relatives and friends developed during the end of the 19th century. During the year 1898, there were only a few cards sent although the number of cards sent since then have increased worldwide.

In the beginning monochrome as well as coloured cards were printed. Most of the time, the centre of the cards contained an oversized egg. During the first years during which Easter postcards were sent, the front side was empty. This was the space for senders to write their greetings because post offices would only allow the address and the stamp on the back side. Because of that, the artistically precious illustrations were deformed.

In 1905, post offices in Austria and Germany separated the back side of the cards into two halves. The right half served as before (for the address and the stamp) and the other half was the new space for the message. In 1906 this was officially allowed by the world-post-congress in Rome

Chocolate Easter Eggs

The 17th and 18th centuries saw the manufacture of egg-shaped toys, which were given to children at Easter. The Victorians had cardboard, plush and satin covered eggs filled with Easter gifts and chocolates. The ultimate egg-shaped Easter gifts must have been the fabulous jewelled creations of Carl Fabergé made during the 19th century for the Russian Czar and Czarina, now precious museum pieces.

Chocolate Easter eggs were first made in Europe in the early 19th century, with France and Germany taking the lead in this new artistic confectionery. Some early eggs were solid, as the technique for mass-producing moulded chocolate had not been devised. The production of the first hollow chocolate eggs must have been painstaking, as the moulds were lined with paste chocolate one at a time.

Easter Songs for Children

Easter Sunday

The giving of Easter Eggs is a tradition going back hundreds of years marking the end of Lent which for many chocolate lovers is a welcome relief. So what better way to celebrate Easter than sending your loved ones at home or abroad a Chocolate Easter egg?

Easter Sunday is a happy day for Christians because they believe that Jesus rose from the dead on this day. They believe that Jesus' resurrection shows that death is not the end of everything. Many go to church to thank God for Jesus' life. Church bells are rung and churches are decorated with flowers such as white lilies which are associated with Easter. The colours in the church change to white or gold which are thought to be the best colours.

Easter Traditions in Ireland Past and Present

Easter is the most important date on the Roman Catholic calendar. It is far more important than Christmas from a religious standpoint. Because Catholicism has been the dominant religion in Ireland, Easter has been almost universally celebrated there
Easter is the most important date on the Roman Catholic calendar. It is far more important than Christmas from a religious standpoint. Because Catholicism has been the dominant religion in Ireland, Easter has been almost universally celebrated there | Source

Past And Present Easter Traditions In Ireland

One of the most important religious dates in the Irish calendar, apart from St Patrick’s Day, is Easter as we celebrate the resurrection of Jesus. In Ireland preparation for Easter starts on the first day of Lent, forty days before Easter Sunday.

From the first day of Lent Irish people would stop eating meat but would also give up for the forty days of Lent something they enjoy, such as going to the pub for a pint, or a glass of wine, giving up their favourite food, usually cakes or biscuits or both, crisps, cigarettes, anything that the individual feels that they would consider a ‘sacrifice’.

The 40 days of Lent

Lent  is a solemn observance in the liturgical year of many Christian denominations, lasting for a period of approximately six weeks leading up to Easter Sunday. In the general Latin-rite and most Western denominations Lent is taken to run from Ash W
Lent is a solemn observance in the liturgical year of many Christian denominations, lasting for a period of approximately six weeks leading up to Easter Sunday. In the general Latin-rite and most Western denominations Lent is taken to run from Ash W | Source

40 Days of Lent

During the forty days of Lent meat would not be eaten on a Friday. In its place fish would be eaten. It is a time of self discipline and reflection, but also a time for Irish families to spend some quality time together and give the gift of Easter eggs and chocolates. Most people give up chocolate for Lent so an Easter egg and chocolates is a lovely treat.

The last week of Lent is the most important part of the fasting period with Palm Sunday being a week before Holy week which sees the coming of Easter and the resurrection of Our lord, Jesus Christ.

Many families would prepare their homes for Easter Sunday by doing what would be better known as, spring cleaning, to prepare the house for blessing by the local priest which is a religious ceremony that dates back hundreds of years.

Sermon on The Mount

Good Friday

No outdoor work should take place on Good Friday in Ireland and should be treated as a day of rest and preparation of body and soul for Easter. Most public houses and restaurants will close on Good Friday and reopen Easter Saturday.

On Good Friday people would attend confessions asking for forgiveness for their sins. They would then treat themselves to new clothes and shoes in preparation for Easter Sunday mass.

Eggs would ‘not’ be eaten during the time of Lent and would be presented to the Irish household on Good Friday, but not eaten until Easter Sunday. These eggs would be hard boiled and then painted with different colours and designs. These have been replaced with chocolate Easter eggs for the children, with over five million being purchased each year in Ireland.

Easter Traditions

Easter Sunday in many homes is very similar to any other Sunday or religious day in Ireland. Families get together dressed in their new clothes and would attend mass together in their local church.
Easter Sunday in many homes is very similar to any other Sunday or religious day in Ireland. Families get together dressed in their new clothes and would attend mass together in their local church. | Source

Holy Saturday Traditions in Ireland

Holy Saturday would be a day that Irish people take a vow of silence but also attend a special ceremony to have their Holy water blessed but would also attend the Easter Vigil which usually starts at 10pm with the Church decorated in purple colour banners to celebrate the arrival of the King.

All lights in the Church are extinguished at 11pm with a new flame being presented to the altar of the church which is a Paschal candle, a symbol of the Risen Christ and the celebrations of the Holy Flame.

Easter Sunday in many homes is very similar to any other Sunday or religious day in Ireland. Families get together dressed in their new clothes and would attend mass together in their local church.

After attending mass on Easter Sunday everyone would make their way back home to start the Easter feast which is usually made up of Roast Beef, chicken, lamb, potatoes and vegetables, gravy and followed by a Homemade Easter cake, usually decorated with yellow chickens and chocolate flakes.

The Ressurection

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Comments 8 comments

viking305 profile image

viking305 5 years ago from Ireland

Very interesting facts here about the Irish tradition of Easter. I love easter eggs too. Easter is my favourite time of year because it heralds the start of spring in my mind and then the long days of summer.


LuisGabriel2 profile image

LuisGabriel2 5 years ago

Great Post you have here. I enjoy the easter holidays (Good old days). Oh Garlic Angel why did you have to create such an amazing page! You now left me craving for some easter eggs :)


Garlic Angel profile image

Garlic Angel 5 years ago from Dublin Author

Hi viking305

Thank you for stopping by and leaving your thoughts. Yes I love Easter myself and for the same Reasons, it means spring and summer is on the way. We have all been going though such a bad time here in Ireland what with the political situation and the upcoming election so the thoughts of warm days and all the lovely spring and summer flowers is a welcome thought.

I also love the chocolate that goes with Easter of course LOL

Catch you again Viking and keep up the good work, loving your work :-)

Garlic Angel ...


Garlic Angel profile image

Garlic Angel 5 years ago from Dublin Author

LuisGabriel2

LOL :-)

Sorry for giving you a craving for chocolate eggs but glad at the same time as I am hoping I will sell some from my adds, hard times, so need some extra income..

Yes I love all the Easter traditions. I am not overly religious but I do my best to follow some of the old traditions.

Thank you for visiting my hub and hope to catch you again. Take care of you.

Garlic Angel :-)


Pamela Kinnaird W profile image

Pamela Kinnaird W 5 years ago from Maui and Arizona

Thank you for sharing these experiences about your traditions. It's very interesting. My forefathers (on one lineage) were Irish so I always like to read about Ireland and all things Irish.


kidscrafts profile image

kidscrafts 4 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

Interesting article about Ireland! I wish you a lot of chocolate sale! Being originaly from Belgium...I love chocolate...unfortunately, I have to control myself :-(


Garlic Angel profile image

Garlic Angel 4 years ago from Dublin Author

Hi Pamela

Thank you for visiting. Yes like you I like 'All things Irish' and it is great to be able to share these with everyone. I am glad you enjoyed it.

Happy Easter to you and all your family and friends.

Garlic angel :-)


Garlic Angel profile image

Garlic Angel 4 years ago from Dublin Author

Hello Kidscrafts

Thank you for your comment and best wishes. Yes I love chocolate myself and I look forward to 'hopefully' lots and lots of Easter eggs.. Sure we can work them off us after Easter :-)

Belgium chocolate is lovely yum yum

Happy Easter to you and all your family and friends.

Garlic Angel :-)

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