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Should Christians Celebrate Christmas?

  1. Greg Sereda profile image83
    Greg Seredaposted 4 years ago

    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/7447397_f248.jpg
    With so many elements of Christmas being distinctly pagan:

    Dec. 25 - Birthday of the Pagan Sun God, Mithra
    Christmas Tree - Pagan Idol
    Santa Clause - A lie and anti-christ in every sense of the word

    Should Christians celebrate Christmas?

    1. Uninvited Writer profile image82
      Uninvited Writerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Santa Claus is the anti-christ? I think you got the letter order mixed up.

      1. Greg Sereda profile image83
        Greg Seredaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        How so?

        1. Uninvited Writer profile image82
          Uninvited Writerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Santa is not Satan...

          1. Greg Sereda profile image83
            Greg Seredaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            The term anti-christ applies to everyone that either is against Christ or takes the place of Christ in some way. The Bible speaks of many anti-christs. Santa Clause falls in that category.

            1. Repairguy47 profile image60
              Repairguy47posted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Where is poor old Santa claiming to be Christ?

              1. Greg Sereda profile image83
                Greg Seredaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                They're both eternal.
                The're both all-knowing.
                Their arrival is a mystery.

                And it goes on. I include a more comprehensive list in a hub I wrote abot the topic, recently. And a cite a source at the bottom of my hub with a list of 25 points in which they're similar.

        2. profile image0
          Motown2Chitownposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I would think that virtually everyone in the free world knows that Jesus wasn't born on December 25.  That being said, He was born.  That is what Christians celebrate on Christmas.  If it would make things easier for you, perhaps we could celebrate it on June 16.  Ultimately, one day, Jesus was born.  We don't know what day that was precisely, but we choose to celebrate his birth on December 25.

          Many Pagan symbols and traditions have been 'baptized' over time.  Co-opted by Christians, if you will, to celebrate important events in the life of Christ.

    2. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Should we??  you ask?

      We should, we do, we will, always celebrate Christmas.   You should know that a tree and a specific date and etc. are not the basis for celebrating Christmas anyway.  The birth of Jesus CHRIST is what we celebrate.
      You can question whatever you want.   But our answer remains the same always.

      1. Greg Sereda profile image83
        Greg Seredaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        It's as if you're speaking for the whole of Christendom... But did you know that Jesus was not born on Dec. 25?

      2. wilderness profile image96
        wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Good for you, Brenda.  Early causes for a celebration on (or about) Dec. 25 varied from the winter solstice, the end of the harvest season, the birth of Mithra, the beginning of the sun's return and others.  In terms of Christianity the date and celebration were created purely to encourage pagans to convert to Christianity.

        Today the reason may be from a month of profits from rabid consumerism, a day of family togetherness, the birth of Christ, or just getting gifts if you are a small child.  People celebrate by putting up decorations, sticking a tree in their living room, shopping, giving or by a day of prayer as well as other methods.

        Why or how you celebrate doesn't matter.  Dec. 25 is almost universally considered a day of love, of sharing and giving, and of family among all celebrants and is worthy of continuation simply because of that.

  2. Uninvited Writer profile image82
    Uninvited Writerposted 4 years ago

    Santa CLAUS does not replace anyone. It is a harmless fiction that makes many children very happy.
    Besides, he is based on St. Nicholas.

    1. Greg Sereda profile image83
      Greg Seredaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      St. Nicholas is a fictional character; and when you place more emphasis on Santa than Jesus, as most families do during Christmas, he replaces Jesus. I recently wrote a hub touching on this.

  3. Janellegems profile image49
    Janellegemsposted 4 years ago

    A church I went to in Georgia a few years ago shared the knowledge of history of December 25th and the christmas tree and it became a revelation and it changed my opinion of Christmas.  I wondered if December 25th appropriate for celebrating the birth of Christ.  I also stopped putting up a christmas tree, because I do believe it is an idol and santa clause has taken the place of christ.   The only decorations I put up are the nativity sets and lights outside my home.  I think some christians, ministers and churches are not knowledgeable about what took place on December 25th.  If they fully were aware and embrace the history behind the date, maybe their opinions and views of celebrating Christ's birth on this date might change.

    1. Greg Sereda profile image83
      Greg Seredaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Praise God!

  4. Kangaroo_Jase profile image82
    Kangaroo_Jaseposted 4 years ago

    I think I will just stick to peace and goodwill to all persons.

  5. ThompsonPen profile image84
    ThompsonPenposted 4 years ago

    I like this question. It's true. Santa is some what of a false idol. As a public figure, I think he works very nicely. but when you start breaking it down into proper Christianity, Santa is not Christ, and is thus taking away from his glory, and it is he who is to be celebrated.
    That being said, yes, the Christmas date was set due to wanting to sway pagans to Christianity. Just like Easter is a mocking version of Oestera, the Spring celebration of fertility and the blossoming of the land for pagans.
    I think that Christmas should be celebrated, and can be celebrated in the name of Jesus, just without focusing on his birth, and instead focusing on his messages: to love. The key to celebrating this message is not to do it just during this time, but year 'round. Love thy neighbor, love thy parents, love thy deity. Love is the way.
    But as it stands, Christmas hardly seems to be about Love these days for many. It's about the consumerism. Selling products, buying expensive gifts, topping the gifts from last year, having the latest things, Black Friday - and so on. And don't get me started on the music.
    Personally, I'm a bit of a Scruge. I'm not a fan of Christmas because it's gotten away from its true meaning. I get sucked into and forced to celebrate it every year. I just want to be around people, I don't want to feel pressured into buying things for every one.
    I'm getting off topic.
    I think that if Christians are going to keep love in their heart then they are celebrating it as Jesus would have wanted them to, regardless of the date. I think as long as every day is celebrated with love that Jesus's message will have been received unto the world.
    And that does mean every one. Loving every one.

    1. Greg Sereda profile image83
      Greg Seredaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      That is the best reply I have seen in this forum so far. God bless you for your comment!

      1. ThompsonPen profile image84
        ThompsonPenposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Why, thank you smile

  6. Uninvited Writer profile image82
    Uninvited Writerposted 4 years ago

    Everyone celebrates Christmas in their own way. You have no right to tell anyone they are celebrating "wrong".  You don't have to buy into the crass commercialization of the holiday, which is a lot worse in the US than even Canada.  Christmas really is what you make it for yourself.

    As far as I know, it's possible to believe in Jesus and Santa Claus at the same time.

    Actually, St. Nicholas did exist. There is more proof of his existence than of Jesus.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Nicholas

    Even Scrooge believed in Christmas in the end...

    1. Greg Sereda profile image83
      Greg Seredaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Fist of all, I never told anyone they are celebrating Christmas "wrong". I just stated some facts about it. I'm sorry if they inconvenienced you. Second of all, even if I wanted to tell they people they are celebrating it "wrong", I do have that right; because I have a voice and I have every right to speak my opinions.

      About Santa Clause being Saint Nicholas. If you do some more research, you will discover that everything we know about Saint Nicholas is derived from myth and legend. His name doesn't even appear in any documents from the era in which he supposedly lived. Here's a couple of links to help you:

      http://orthodoxwiki.org/Nicholas_of_Myra

      http://lnstar.com/mall/main-areas/santafaq.htm

      I'm sorry that you have more faith in Santa Clause than in Jesus Christ. I don't! With that being said. Merry Christmas! smile

      1. wilderness profile image96
        wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        The catholic encyclopedia has mention of St. Nicholas, from the 4th century.  Considering the time period, he is fairly well documented in church writings, and the encyclopedia even has small mention of the connection to Santa.

        http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11063b.htm

        1. Greg Sereda profile image83
          Greg Seredaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I just clicked the link you provided to see how well documented he was, and this is what it said: "...there is scarcely anything historically certain about him except that he was Bishop of Myra in the fourth century."

          1. wilderness profile image96
            wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            That is correct - he was mentioned in documents.  Very little else is actually known, but he was mentioned.

            That doesn't mean, however, that he is not the basis for the myth of Santa.  Myths often have roots in fact even those roots are nothing like reality.  The church made Nicholas into a saint, stories grew (true or not) and the myth began.  Later additions include Rudolph, the north pole, toys and so on which had nothing to do with Nicholas's life, but that's what myths do.

            1. Greg Sereda profile image83
              Greg Seredaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Don't get my wrong. He was mentioned in documents; but according to what I have read, those documents date to the 9th cent. not to the 4th cent., when he was supposed to be Bishop. And most of those documents are full of myths and legends.

      2. Uninvited Writer profile image82
        Uninvited Writerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I didn't say that.

  7. Uninvited Writer profile image82
    Uninvited Writerposted 4 years ago

    I know this is petty but it is Santa Claus... there is no e... that is the title of a stupid movie.

    1. Greg Sereda profile image83
      Greg Seredaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      You're right. I guess I should have double checked that.

 
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