A Certain Place In The World

Source

Some say the very basis of a man’s personality is formed when they are mere boys. Perhaps it’s because of certain events they take part in or have witnessed at a young age. I can personally attest to this being accurate for some, and at least in my case it is true enough.

Jerry Cauthern was my best friend and closest neighbor out in the rural countryside of southeastern Georgia. The nearest town--a small one at that--was known as Clear Springs. Not that we went to town very often as it was too far to walk.

We usually went only when we needed a haircut every couple of weeks or so, but we didn’t miss it much as the tiny hamlet had little to offer in the way of entertainment.

The mysterious bays of southern Georgia beckon to young adventurers.
The mysterious bays of southern Georgia beckon to young adventurers. | Source

Life To Explore

Besides, we had thousands of acres to wander and explore in the vast--and to us--mysterious swamps of the area. That is, when we weren’t working in the fields cropping tobacco or hoeing peanuts on our parent’s farms.

They call me Bobby, after my father Robert Carson, and I’m very proud to be named after him. He served in WWII, fought in many famous battles--D-Day, and The Battle of the Bulge, just to name a few--and survived until the war was finally over.

He then came home to farm and raise a family, because it was all he'd ever really wanted to do. A good man he was. In fact, as good a man as I've ever known in my long lifetime.

Source

South Georgia was in the midst of a great change at this time. Gone were the days when the countryside was dotted with the small homes of poor black sharecroppers all farming with mules. That was my grandfather’s era and it was all he’d known his entire life

He was of the old school, and like many others of his generation, he hated change of any shape or form. I was never very close to him at all, certainly not like I was with Dad. But then, Dad had seen the world where grandfather had only known Georgia. It made a great difference, I suppose.

Jerry and I decided to go camping one weekend when the weather finally turned cool enough for the skeeters not to be so bad. We chose Carson’s Bay because it was close by, and because it had always been home to the famous Crier. But the Crier of Carson’s Bay is another story, for another day and time.

Evictions of black sharecroppers were commonplace after WWII.
Evictions of black sharecroppers were commonplace after WWII. | Source

The year was 1963 and Jerry and I were 13 years old at the time. The south was different then, different in a way folks don’t realize now, or don’t want to remember if the truth be told. It was a white man’s world in Georgia back then.

A white man’s kingdom, some thought it was. But my Dad had seen enough of this type of injustice during his time in the war. I suppose he had seen misery and sorrow in all races of men while fighting the Axis powers.

He came back with a different outlook towards the poor blacks who barely scraped a living in the tobacco and cotton fields, or chipping the yellow pine for the turpentine distilleries in the area. There was little else offered them. I suppose misery eats at one’s soul, even if it isn’t one’s own personal misery. The pain and sorrow of others can be almost as bad as one’s own. I know this for a fact.

The path leading into Carson's Bay
The path leading into Carson's Bay | Source
Source

So Jerry and I entered Carson’s Bay late one Saturday evening, setting up an old oiled tarp as a tent for the night and anxious for our adventure. We took our fishing poles, as the bay was full of catfish we planned to exploit if lucky enough.

We gathered up our other provisions, such as a loaf of bread, eggs, and a small ham to slice and cook in the skillet, along with a couple of blankets to cut the chill at night. All this we toted in burlap sacks thrown across our skinny shoulders. We settled in fairly soon and watched as the sun went down behind the moss draped trees surrounding our camp.

The moon was full, and so bright we let the campfire burn down to just embers as we lolled around staring into it. Full of good food and a bit drowsy as well, we thought at first we’d imagined the screams. “Did you hear that?” Jerry gasped . “Coulda been a panther,” I replied, thinking about these rarely seen big cats which on occasion, roamed these thick swamps.

Source

“Nope,” Jerry replied softly “that was a man screaming, sounds like he’s in bad pain or somethin‘.” My first thought was it was the Crier, but I knew the Crier never sounded in pain, at least not in the many tales I’d heard about him.

“Lets go see if we can help him,” I said “it may be somebody we know in trouble out here.” We didn’t have a flashlight nor did we need one with the moon being so bright in the sky. At this time the pine timber in the bay was tall and open, the ground beneath it covered with either palmetto bushes or wire grass.

Regular burning kept it clear of other trees and bushes for the most part. As long as we didn’t step on a snake or in a hole, we’d be okay. After fifteen minutes or so of moving we could see a large fire in the distance. The screams had stopped for the moment, but we could hear muffled voices.

Source

At first I thought the figures were ghosts. Tall and completely white, they appeared to float around the fire as we snuck closer, using the palmettos to hide our approach from the creatures. “Oh God,” Jerry gasped “it’s the Klan.”

He was right, I could see the head klansman with his specially marked hood, so recognizable at the time. He stood by silently while several of his soldiers threw water in the face of a rather small black man we hadn’t noticed lying unconscious on the ground.

With their captive finally aroused, they began holding his feet closer to the fire as I assumed they had before. I was certain they had done other horrible things to this poor creature before we had arrived. Even worse, I knew the young black man.

Source

A War of my Own

Only 25 years of age or so, he had dared to stand up to some bullies in town not long ago, had whipped three of the white boys before getting out of town to safety. But they had caught him at last and now he was paying the price for standing up for himself.

The nerve of doing so did not impress this group of men. No…not these men. Not too many years from that horrific night I also went to war.

My tour in Vietnam exposed me to all manner of cruelty and suffering, perhaps similar in nature to what my father suffered in his own war. We both saw enemies on different sides, saw them killing each other senselessly, as in all wars. But not in this manner of cold heartedness.

Dreams To Forget

I still wake up some nights in a cold sweat, hearing the faint echoes of those horrid screams ringing in my ears, smelling the faint aroma of charred flesh, remembering the things I wanted so badly to forget, but cannot.

Perhaps worst of all was when we began to creep slowly away in horror, both of us only pausing to vomit up our disgust with mankind as we crept shakily along towards our own campsite. This was when we heard the Klan’s leader say “Poke them feet deep in thet far boys, he needs to ‘member his place in the world.”

I’d know my grandfather’s voice anywhere.

Source

More by this Author


Comments 112 comments

Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ

Beautifully done and very disturbing.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for giving your opinion on this one, Becky. Actually, this one was written as a potential contest entry on another site but it exceeded the 1000 word limit for that one. I was in hopes you and others would give me an idea if it was worth salvaging or not. I knew I could depend on you!

Thanks again for all of your encouragement and time. I truly do appreciate it. :)

Randy


billybuc profile image

billybuc 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

Incredible story, Randy! I think you captured the Deep South of a different era pretty darn well. Nice job!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for your input, Bill. You gotta remember, I lived through the same time period and saw a lot of things as a 13 year old. Nothing as harsh as I've described in this tale, but still things not pleasant.

Thanks again!

-RG


CMHypno profile image

CMHypno 3 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

Beautiful story Randy. Most of the misery in the world we humans create ourselves. The solution is pretty simple (just be nice to ourselves and others), but we don't seem yet to be very good at it!


A Driveby Quipper profile image

A Driveby Quipper 3 years ago

Great way to to start the day . . . this instead of the news. I feel like I need to accomplish something great today.

This is the stuff that makes for Neo-Southern Classic such a strong new genre. Look out for the SEC!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Good morning Cynthia (here at any rate). Thank you for reading this tale. I only posted it here as a second thought as it was too long for the original purpose of being a 10000 word contest entry.

Yes, there was so much anger back then and I'm sad to say I lived through such useless emotions at the time. And no, we still aren't very good at handling it.

I really appreciate your input onmy fictional attempts.

Randy


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Good morning to you, Quipper! This is one I I planned for elsewhere but decided to get a bit of input on before I decided what to do with it, or if indeed I would simply put it away till a later time.

I have so many I've written with no place for them yet but perhaps in due time. And yes, I do like to pen what you refer to as Neo-Southern Classic tales as they describe much of my life here in the south.

Many thanks for your time and comments, as always.

SSSSS


bravewarrior profile image

bravewarrior 3 years ago from Central Florida

Holy Crap! I wasn't expecting the ending. Is this a true story, Randy?

Either way, it is well told. You are an excellent writer in my view.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

No Shauna, this particular tale is merely fictional, as far as the characters are concerned, but there were many similar incidents--and those who took part in them-- during this time period.

Thank you so also for your nice comments on my writing ability. I love to create these short tales and am very pleased they are enjoyed by others. :)

Randy


bravewarrior profile image

bravewarrior 3 years ago from Central Florida

Randy, I love a good read. Your tales are captivating and your english/grammar are spot on. Too many hubs contain misspellings and misusage by Americans. Sometimes it makes me cringe, but I don't say so in my comments. As far as I'm concerned, even if the plot is good, bad grammar is very distracting and lowers the rating of what could have been a good story.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I really appreciate your saying so, Shauna. I've never been educated in any type of journalism efforts and really worry about the quality and style of my writing sometimes. I too find excessive grammar or spelling mistakes distracting from a story line. However, I also realize how easy it is to make such errors. I seem to be continuously finding mistakes in my tales and trying to fix them. Thanks again for your encouragement and time. :)

--RG


KoffeeKlatch Gals profile image

KoffeeKlatch Gals 3 years ago from Sunny Florida

What a story. Beautifully written with a disturbing ending. I was enthralled from beginning to end. Up and awesome.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

@KoffeeKlatch Gals--Thank you so much for reading this tale with a rather shocking ending. It was actually written for a contest on another venue but was a bit too long for the particular category.

I was a bit hesitant to put it here but wanted to get a bit of input on it from those I respect before placing it elsewhere. No doubt it will be idled before long as most of my fiction inevitably is on HP.

For me this is all HP is good for these days as the idle feature has ruined any motivation to publish any potential evergreen hubs again.

Once again, many thanks for your time and comments. It is much appreciated. :)

--RG


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 3 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

Superb, with a chilling twist at the end.

Wow!

This is a winner.


A Driveby Quipper profile image

A Driveby Quipper 3 years ago

@ Randy - There is a place for them all. I think you should start sending them to Colliers and Atlantic (Monthly) Magazine and like that. In due time, some wanna-be web magazine that some kooks I know are working on will feature some.

I talked to Madame Zelda today. She said she sees a leather bound coffee table compilation in your future!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Will, many thanks for your time and for your opinion on this effort. I will certainly repay you in kind my friend, :)

--RG


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks, Quipper! I have a few stories already in the shipping envelopes and ready to mail to some of the places you mention I've also heard tell of such a web magazine and am eager to try my luck there too. I've been slowly deleting my fiction from here and some may be worthy of using elsewhere, but still, I'm writing more often than ever.

Thanks for reading,

SSSSS


A Driveby Quipper profile image

A Driveby Quipper 3 years ago

My pleasure.


A Driveby Quipper profile image

A Driveby Quipper 3 years ago

Did I just get spammed?


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Apparently so, Quipper! I had to enable your last comment as it was listed as spam. Beats me why, though!


trish1048 profile image

trish1048 3 years ago

Hi Randy,

Once again, you held my attention from beginning to end. The ending was quite surprising, to say the least. If you haven't published any books yet, I say shame on all the publishers! I would be first in line to buy your books!

Sad to say, a world filled with such hate is definitely disturbing.

Well done, as usual :)


A Driveby Quipper profile image

A Driveby Quipper 3 years ago

Thank to hearts, and works like this, that hate is dissipating.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hello again, Trish! And thanks once more for your much appreciated comments on my fictional efforts. I am indeed submitting some of my work to a few select publishers, but it remains to be seen whether they like my style of writing or the subjects I choose to explore.

Thanks to you and other special people I have had the pleasure to know here for giving me the courage to at least give it a shot. Once again, thanks for your valuable time. :)

Randy


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Many thanks to you too, Quipper! You've been so much help to me in finding outlets for my ramblings about the south. Perhaps I can buy you dinner one of these days when I'm in the area. Know any good seafood joints? :)

sssss


JayeWisdom profile image

JayeWisdom 3 years ago from Deep South, USA

This is a gripping tale, Randy, and the ending is superb. It is definitely worth the read. I think you should consider putting together a collection of short fiction about growing up in Georgia of the mid-twentieth century.

Voted Up and Awesome

Jaye


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 years ago from sunny Florida

Randy,

You had me from the first few words and I read on anxious to see how it would end. I will be back to read more of your posts for sure.

Voted up ++++

Sending Angels your way :) ps


cam8510 profile image

cam8510 3 years ago from Columbus, Georgia until the end of November 2016.

Randy, this is a gripping story with a disturbing, heartbreaking end. You asked for some input so I am going to use email and not take up the space here. Good job.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hello again, Jaye. Yes, the ending is a bit shocking and I didn't know how it would be accepted by the readers, but apparently it fulfilled its intention as the feedback from the readers seems to indicate.

I do have a few tales I'm considering making into an anthology, perhaps for an ebook in the near future if I have the time. Thanks for the suggestions and especially for your taking the time to peruse this story. And good luck getting over that pesky virus too! :)

Randy


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

@Pstraubie48--Many thanks for your kind comments, Patricia. I always appreciate it when someone takes the time to read my imagination and leaves such valuable input I can use to judge the worthiness of my fictional efforts.

Once again, many thanks to you!

Randy


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for honoring my request, Chris. I'll be looking forward to your email. Thanks for your kind comments also!

--RG


trish1048 profile image

trish1048 3 years ago

Randy,

I'm happy to hear you are in touch with several publishers. I certainly wish you the best of luck with that, and please, let me know when you get published! :)


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 3 years ago from West Virginia

I'd thought that I would read one of you hubs and this was the first one to pop up. OMG! How horrible it was to live back in them days. I also know that prejudice lasts forever and that has been my experience with my mom. She is very prejudice. I don't talk about blacks when I am in her presence.

The Wars, Oh my Step Father was in several of them and could not talk about them util a few weeks before he passed away. I have a hub about him but it doesn't get much exposure.

When I read the hub it made me feel like I was there with you and your friend. The horrible things people do to others because they are not like them or believe the same things is atrocious. Ironically I seem to be pulled into sticking up for those that are oppressed and suppressed.

Great article Randy. I will be reading more of your writing--other than the demise of the forums and such.

I started posting my articles on Zujava that HP didn't like and went from there about Children. Perhaps you can wander over there to look at one of them.

Debbie


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Many thanks Lady G(Debbie) for reading this fictional piece. I'll have to admit this one is a bit horrifying and I'd like you to know it isn't typical of my usual fiction. I have other less disturbing tales and hope you decide to check them out also. I suggest "Spirit of Old Savannah" for a more lighthearted and magical read compared to this one. Still, I am pleased with this effort even though these type tales take a bit out of me sometimes.

I modeled the main character's father after my own in real life. He indeed landed on Omaha beach on D-Day, helped liberate Paris as he was in Patton's 3rd army, fought in the Battle of the Bulge, and then went on to help liberate the horrible holocaust camps in Germany.

He was indeed one of the best and most liked men I've ever known. Like your step-father, he didn't discuss many aspects of his time during the war, but as he got older I learned so many things about his time in the service. Most I never discussed with my mom, of course. I respected him even more after learning some things he never told anyone else. As I said, a great man.

I really appreciate your time spent reading and commenting, Debbie. And I'll be sure to check out your work also. :)

Randy


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 3 years ago from West Virginia

I meant to say my Father in Law. He was also a great man like your father was. I will go and check out your other hub. I like a bit of mystery and magic...er why I chose my pen name that I have had since the mid-80's.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I suppose this is why they often refer to them as "The Greatest Generation," Debbie. I cannot say I disagree with them on this reference. I think you will enjoy the hub I recommended. I kinda like it myself as it was written with my mother's side of the family in mind.

Thanks again,

Randy


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Oops Trish, I've had so many comment to reply to I somehow missed yours. My apologies to you. Rest assured, I will let everyone know if the right publisher selects one of my tales to feature in their venue. I have some stuff out there already but none I wish to crow about now. But whatever happens, I enjoy writing fiction immensely if nothing for the joy of it.

Many thanks for your encouraging words and time spent reading my tales.

--RG


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 3 years ago from West Virginia

Have you tried Readers Digest for your stories? They do take them kind.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Actually, I believe they no longer accept unsolicited submissions, Debbie. I know they did at one time, however. I've discovered a few places worthy of submitting such tales with some paying very well indeed, so I'm sending them a few for their approval. Wish me luck! lol!


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 3 years ago from West Virginia

Oh yes I will wish you luck...you have all the luck you can get for the Irish! I be the other Celt hardly anyone wants to talk about--Welsh. I wish I knew some of my ancestors tales.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

ha,ha! I'm a mixture of English, Irish, Scotch, and perhaps Heinz 57 if the truth be known, Debbie. Of course I always claim to be mainly Irish on St. Paddys Day in Savannah as it usually earns me a few free drinks! lol!


lovedoctor926 3 years ago

A very well-written and interesting tale. Good visuals. The first image is lovely.


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 3 years ago from West Virginia

LOL LOL


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

@lovedoctor--Yes Marlene, the first photo is intended to give the reader a sense of peace and comfort in preparation for the twist at the end of the tale. I assume it worked as most are surprised by the ending.

Your time and comments are very welcome and truly appreciated on this story. Thanks again!

--RG


JayeWisdom profile image

JayeWisdom 3 years ago from Deep South, USA

Randy....I forgot to mention earlier how much your photos add to the story, so I came back to rectify that oversight.

Jaye


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 3 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

I stand corrected, Randy!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks Jaye. I really believe it depends on the particular venue and/or the effect one is trying to achieve. I was just discussing this very thing with another HP fiction writer I admire today and I agreed with him that using too many photos on some stories may tend to break the rhythm of the tale or distract the reader. I know I'm guilty of using too many visuals on my tales here sometimes, but then, I'd never submit them to a publisher unless it pertained to my historical fiction pieces.

I love to get input from different writers about such things, and I often find there are differing opinions among us all. lol! But I learn so much from the CW writers here and appreciate everything they have to offer in the way of advice.

--RG


A Driveby Quipper profile image

A Driveby Quipper 3 years ago

@Randy - Get real. Your photos are great and they enhance the story. I can assure you that my opinion is correct.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Not at all, Will! LOL! See my last comment to Jaye. I truly believe it depends on the tale and the venue, and of course, the particular readers themselves. Dang, understanding writing is tough!! lol

RG


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Ha! Thanks Quipper, but I do tend to go overboard on my photos sometimes. I jest like them purty pictures. lol. After the last two places I wrote--which allowed either no photos or only one--I loved being able to use as many as I pleased. I got spoiled, dammit. lol

--RG


girishpuri profile image

girishpuri 3 years ago from NCR , INDIA

Beautiful story, Randy, God bless.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for stopping by, girishpuri! I'm pleased you enjoyed my short tale of the deep south and found it worthy of your nice comments. :)

--Randy


Storytellersrus profile image

Storytellersrus 3 years ago from Stepping past clutter

Incredible depth, Randy. I am impressed.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thank you for reading, Barbara. I'm trying to learn how write Flash Fiction but this one was just too long and I didn't wish to trim it down enough to qualify for a contest. I'm not sure FF is my thing as I'm always a bit "wordy."

I really appreciate your time and comments. :)

--RG


DJ Anderson 3 years ago

Randy, I am only now beginning to read your many works. I was enthralled with "The Spirit Of Savannah", and commented to you how much I enjoyed it. You did respond in kind.

I was born and raised in the south; MS., AL., and GA. Thankfully, my parents were not racists. Still, I was aware and shocked at stories that I heard. They left indelible scars in my mind. They are with me today, ever as fresh and shocking as the first day I heard them.

While reading your incredible story, I was walking through those dark woods, every step of the way, with you and Jerry. When I read your last sentence, my heart jumped up in my throat. My pulse quickened and I felt nauseous.

Bare with me as I relate this all too true story.

We had moved to AL. and I met a young woman close to my age. She was from a prominent family and he father was a well regarded physician.

She called one day and asked if she could come over. I could hear the urgency in her voice. When she arrived, she fell in my door crying so hard that she could not speak for several minutes. Each time she started to speak, she would fall apart, again.

When she spoke, she said her father had brought her robes to hem. My first thought was choir robes, but I was wrong. They were hooded robes, all white. She had no idea that her father was with the KKK. It

broke her heart, as she was forced to see her father as a man she really did not know. Her plan was to return the robes without hemming them. She had confided in me and then she took on the shame of her father's activities. It was the end of a short lived friendship.

Your writings take your readers into a tangible world where the sights and sounds are as real and palpable as if we stand beside your lead character. The night sounds can be heard; the smoldering campfire smelled.

This world is not always a beautiful place to be. The stories must be told. The memories never forgotten, lest we repeat the hell from which we have risen above.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thank you so very much for relating your own tale of these shameful times, DJ. Your story tells just how much the Klan was mired in the southern tradition for so many years.

I do understand how difficult it is for most people to change their feelings of prejudice in such a short time, but I do believe we have made great progress here in the Deep South. Not enough though.

Once again, I truly do appreciate your nice comments on my writing ability and it only impels me to do an even better job in the future. Thanks so much for your time and interesting input on this story.

Randy :)


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 3 years ago from North Carolina

Randy, I'll bet this story happened in reality, and more than a few times. Maybe even with the surprising twist at the end. I know how Georgia was in the 60s growing up and everything you've said in this was true. As a matter of fact I saw some of it first-hand as a little guy. Good story and enjoyed your personal pics, guess in some ways things have gotten better over time. Up and the A my friend.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Yes, I'm afraid you are correct about such things happening for real, Allastar. Georgia was slow to change and it still is in some ways. And yes, I witnessed many acts of racism when I was younger, but not in this cruel manner. Still, I heard many similar tales.

Thanks as always for your pertinent comments and especially for your time reading my ramblings.

--RG


aguasilver profile image

aguasilver 3 years ago from Malaga, Spain

Powerfully written, thanks for the read.

John


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thank you so much for your opinion, John. It just makes my day whenever someone someone enjoys my little tales. This one is a bit close to home for me, not exactly a true tale, but close enough for it to take something out of me in the telling.

Thanks again for your time. :)


Writer Fox profile image

Writer Fox 3 years ago from the wadi near the little river

I hope this is fiction. It's a riveting tale!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Yes Writer Fox, the tale is fiction as far as the characters were concerned. The cruel acts performed upon some black people however, were real enough and often fatal to the victims.

Thanks for your kind comments, and especially for your time. :)


tirelesstraveler profile image

tirelesstraveler 3 years ago from California

Spine tingling story.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thank you for the comment, tirelesstraveler. I appreciate your time. :)


Ben Blackwell 3 years ago

Wow, this is indeed something. Especially the last line, "I'd know my grandfather's voice anywhere." This got me thinking that in public schools, we learn about these kinds of things from very disconnected places. The truth is, there are still some people alive who have done those kinds of things. Also, can you really be that disconnected?


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hello again, Ben. One has to be brought up in such an atmosphere of racial animosity to understand this type of hatred for one's fellow man. Although this tale is fiction, there were even worse things that happened during this time in our country's history. The old saying, "You can choose your friends, but not your family" is still true today.

Thanks for giving this tale a look-see and for your insightful comments.


Ben Blackwell 3 years ago

No problem.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 2 years ago from America

Great story, but so sad. I know many people think the clan was never up north, but they were my father-in-law told stories of the klan in this area. Voted up and shared.


Patsybell profile image

Patsybell 2 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

I don't know what drew me to your story, but I am glad I read this. Voted up, I, tweet


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Your are correct Moonlake, the klan reached places many would never suspect. Unfortunately, here in the Deep South it was too real and too powerful for a long time. Thanks as always for your time and great comments on my meanderings and short tales. :)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I'm pleased you found this story worth your time, Patsy. Many don't understand how much power and influence the Klan had here in the south. Thankfully things have changed since that time, but the lasting effects of such a group of people still is felt among some of the older residents. Thanks so much for your kind words and input on this sad tale. :)


DJ Anderson 2 years ago

Congratulations, Randy!!

Most Awesome Hub Award!

You are best story teller, around.

You certainly deserve this recognition.

My best to you,

DJ.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada.

I grew up fearing the Klan and their reputation. Even though we lived in the Pacific Northwest, we heard the stories, the horrors of these men with no souls. Randy this is a story of truths, an historical fiction that well deserves the "Most Awesome Hub" award. Congratulations.

Up, A, I and H+


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

DJ--I'm very proud to win the award with this tale of misery and truth during the south's time of change for the better. Equality is often a hard thing to come to terms with for some folks.

I appreciate your support for my short tales as always and consider you a good friend as well. :)


DJ Anderson 2 years ago

You know I am one of your biggest fans.

You be sure to let me know when your book of stories comes out.

I want a signed copy!

DJ. :-)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

The klan was still active here in the Deep South when I was growing up, Phyllis. Many do not understand the role they played in keeping blacks 'in their place' as some called it. Good riddance to the robed rouges, I say!

Thanks for your time and input as always, Phyllis! :)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Yours will be the first one I put my moniker on, DJ! :)


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada.

Me, too !!! - I want a signed copy.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Yours will be the second, Phyllis! :)


Austinstar profile image

Austinstar 2 years ago from Somewhere in the universe

I fear that in my repressed memories of my youth in southern Texas, that I too, had family members that went to Klan meetings. Being a girl, they never told me the truth of it, but for some reason, I did suspect it. I dearly loved my grandfather, but I would have lost that love entirely if I had heard his voice like you did here. I'm glad we may be past the worst of bigotry, at least that is my hope.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I too knew those whom I suspected were involved in the doings of the Klan, Austinstar. Like you, I feel great advances have been made since those frightening times. I appreciate your time and your own personal input on this tale. :)


fpherj48 profile image

fpherj48 2 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

BRAVO!!! Congratulations, Randy. Not a single doubt how this fabulous hub won "The Most Awesome Hub Award-2014!!!" Definitely well-earned.... Cheers!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

@ fpherj48--I'm glad you approved of this hub, Paula. I'm still trying to get over winning a Hubbie--especially for a fictional effort--and needless to say, I'm thrilled! Thanks again for the kudos, Paula. :)


rebekahELLE profile image

rebekahELLE 2 years ago from Tampa Bay

Randy, your writing is so real. We can feel and hear everything. I'm so glad to see this topic has won an award. I watched 12 Years a Slave last night, and almost had to turn it off. Humanity with no soul. Your story comes alive today. A big congrats on your win!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hi Rebekah,

Yes, sometimes it's almost too difficult to find out the real truth about man's humanity towards other men, especially the times before this tale was set when slavery was accepted as the norm in this part of the world.

I haven't watched "12 years" yet, but I both want to and dread it at the same time, if you can understand that. Thanks so much for the congrats, I'm truly grateful. :)


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 2 years ago from Hereford, AZ

"The Most Awesome Hub Award-2014!!!" and well-deserved by this Hub. Congratulations Randy.


PurvisBobbi44 profile image

PurvisBobbi44 2 years ago from Florida

Hi,

You did great job writing about the events in Georgia at that point in time.

I cannot endure cruelty to any human or animal---I do not understand how anyone could treat another human in such a manner.

I refused to watch the TV series Roots---my heart is too tender---I suppose it is too tender for the real world of our grandparents.

Have a great week.

Bobbi Purvis


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

My good friend Becky, I can always depend on some nice words from you about my fiction attempts. I really want to thank you for your time and input on them. :)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hi Bobbie,

Yes, sometimes reality is hard to deal with when cruelty, such as I wrote about in this tale, was once accepted as the norm here in the Deep South. But it's important for people to not forget where we came from or we are doomed to repeat such mistakes.

Thank you for your input and time as I am honored to be chosen for a Hubbie on this particular story. :)


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 2 years ago from West Virginia

At least you are in a quiet place now Randy. Great job getting the Award here.


Wayne Brown profile image

Wayne Brown 2 years ago from Texas

I too grew up in the deep South and have some similar memories. One thing I look back on to this day is the type of behavior you describe here. I look back on seeing it and realizing how wrong it was. I look back and feel that I was blessed to know that then, and now. There were many who grew up in that same era with me who did not have that blessing. Ignorance lives in us and thrives on our lack of awareness. That awareness is not as easy to come by as some who were standing outside that circle might think--you had to be there. Still, having seen some of it, I became a better man. That is the part that we can do something about. Great story, Randy. Thanks for sharing it. ~WB


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Lady G--Indeed I am in a quiet place now, Debbie. Living in the country is heaven for me as it always has been. Thanks for being a valued friend. :)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hi Wayne, I'm so pleased you came by and explained what you remember and learned by your time in the Deep South. One had to be there to fully understand the feelings of the day concerning back people and what they went through.

When the first two black students entered my High School in the late 60's I both admired them for their bravery as they walked down the hall lined with angry white students, and feared for their safety in doing so with their heads held high.

I was also ashamed of my fellow white students who knew no better than to hurl racial insults at the pair of well dressed young men as they made their way to their homeroom that memorable morning. I'll wager they didn't sleep a wink the night before. How brave they were.

I'm pleased you found this tale to be of interest, Wayne. Thanks for the great comments. :)

Randy


fpherj48 profile image

fpherj48 2 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

"I'm still trying to get over winning a Hubbie"

Well, get over it, my friend.....and start struttin proud.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks again, Paula. I'll have to practice up on my 'struttin' a bit as I'm sorta out of practice. :P


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

This is an awesome story that is most definitely worthy of a Hubbie award. The dramatic and unexpected sentence at the end shocked and moved me, which is a mark of a great story. It's very disturbing to think that the story reflects the type of events that actually happened. Your hub is an important reminder of a terrible time in history as well as a great work of fiction.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I'm so pleased this story made the readers remember that things have changed so much since then, Alicia. Sure, there are still those who look at our past through rose colored glasses, but not as many as there once were. This was the intent of the tale's telling and I'm proud of the response by the readers.

Thank you for the great comments and for your time, Alicia. And be proud of your Hubbie, as I am of mine. :)


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 2 years ago from West Virginia

Randy, if you want to see the country roads were I live you can visit my bubblews. I am making short posts about the roads there. I finished up with the waters that are around me and then....I have to come up with something else to continue.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Place a link, Debbie. I'd love to see them. :)


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 2 years ago from West Virginia

Here is the first one for the Country Roads and they now have the last ten posts listed on there so you can get to the newer ones: http://www.bubblews.com/news/7048569-country-roads...

Here is the first on for the waters: http://www.bubblews.com/news/6977419-parts-on-the-...


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Beautiful country you live in, Debbie. I love the mountains being as I live in the flatlands among the swamps of Georgia. :)


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Wow, Randy, congrats on the well-deserved most Amazing Hub Hubbie Award!!! I grew up in Georgia, but now live in Alabama. I praise God my parents did not have a racist bone in their body and we never heard any negative talk about any other races, although my parents grew up in Ohio and Mass. then my Dad who was stationed in Ft. Benning, Georgia, we grew up there close to that base.

Certainly, times have changed, thank goodness, but you have painted a picture of the old south with your words, very disturbing indeed!

My Dad was in Korea and VietNam and, although, he had no outside scars from war, his mind was battle-scarred and he suffered terribly with PTSD.

I look forward to reading your interesting and well-written hubs.

Voted Up +++ and away

God bless


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thank you very much for the congrats and the input about your own experiences growing up in the south, Theresa. Sorry to hear about your father's post war problems. My dad had occasional nightmares of his time in WWII, but I think he suffered a bit inside at what he's seen there.

Kudos to you too on your Hubbie, Theresa. I'm banned from the forums so it makes it difficult to praise my fellow hubbers when the occasion arises. Good to hear from you. )

Randy


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Thank you too and, wow, banned from forums ... interesting : )


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

No problem, Theresa. I've been banned quite a while now and hardly miss them. :)


DreamerMeg profile image

DreamerMeg 22 months ago from Northern Ireland

Oh, what a shock. Those are the kinds of experiences that shape a person forever!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 22 months ago from Southern Georgia Author

You are indeed correct, Meg! Many in the Deep South had their lives affected by acts such as these. We must never forget them though. Thanks for the time and input on this tale. :)


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 18 months ago from Bishop, Ca

Your tale is so beautifully written, Randy, that I am stunned. Honestly. As I read it, I was there.

Thank you,

Laurel


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 18 months ago from Bishop, Ca

Apparently, one can no longer edit their post here-I tried, yet it did not 'take'.

I wanted to add that in 1980 I pursued my B.A. in Birmingham, Alabama and in order to get to my college, I had to go through a semi-seedy part of town.

The first time I followed the route, I came upon the Klan at numerous intersections. They were fully garbed, holding buckets for donations. I was never so frightened in my life.

Needless to say, I found a different way to get to school.

Take care Randy.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 18 months ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thank you so much for your time and kind words, Lorlie. Wow, that must have been quite an experience in Birmingham. I just heard on the news last night the Klan has a recruitment drive going on in Mississippi. I suppose it's due to the racial tension there with the police.

Yes, there's still a lot of prejudice in the Deep south despite the progress made in the last 50+ years.

Thanks again for your support, Laurel. :)

Don't know what's up with the editing procedure!


Susie Rutland Harris 18 months ago

Randy, I know I read this story quite some time back here on Hubpages. I knew then it was a winner! But today I'm just seeing that you won an award for it, and I wanted to say congratulations, even though it's a few months after the fact! As I've said before, your gift is inherited through our family genes.....and I'm so glad you are sharing it with others! GREAT story, superbly told and written, and certainly hair-raising in it's content. We know these sorts of things happened, and it is sad. Someday, God will make all things new, and right. I, for one, am ready for that day to come! Much love and best wishes to you and yours, my cousin...from "across the way".


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 18 months ago from Southern Georgia Author

Good morning cuz, and thank you so much for your very nice comments on this short tale of the old south. Thanks goodness things are so much better now than they were back during our childhood. I hope things are going great for you and my other kin also.

It's a wonderful life......

Your cousin,

Randy

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working