Arizona Sky

By: Wayne Brown


The last rays of setting sun struggle with the coming darkness as the blue black of the eastern sky begins to show the familiar pattern of the brightest distant stars in the universe. It’s a one-of-a-kind show well-worth the price of admission and surprisingly it is free to those willing to attend out here in the far wilds of the Arizona desert land. This is still the land of the big sky where all things are visible as God paints his twinkling portrait on the canvas of the night sky. This is a land still much akin to the Native American, wild and free. It is land far from the madness of the big city lights and crowded streets. It is a land only few men chose as their home, yet, when the night sky appears with all its wonder, all who come here know why they stay.


Night after night, the show goes on with a clarity and creativity only God himself can provide to those who watch. The shooting stars make their minute treks into obscurity. On some nights there are far too many of them and they run like raindrops down a blackened pane of glass. There is a sadness in not being able to savor each one as it flashes its last bright marks across to sky in one last hurrah of light that earmarks its farewell. It is a familiar yet different landscape each time it appears and your eyes gaze upon it. The universe in all its wonder is truly exposed to man’s eye in this one place.


The mixture of sunshine, wind, and moisture from the sea is a recipe for an army of towering thunderheads that march along in the night sky fighting among themselves with bolts of lightning that cascade from each of these cumulonimbus giants. They douse the thirsted desert land with precious rain that carries on the wind a scent so distinctive and so welcome as it approaches. Though the sky is temporarily obscured by this dynamic tangle of energy and might, the light show continues as the lightning dances on the desert floor and mesa tops. The thunder grumbles for the attention this beast demands in its trek to the next horizon. When it passes, it leaves behind it the undisturbed beauty of the far universe and the night sky.


This sky bring others as well. Many times you have seen them now. At first they were just distant unfamiliar lights hovering over some far mesa watching the lands below. As time past there were more of them and they came closer. Like the men of earth, they too were curious and could not turn away from their questioning nature. They have not come to harm but to learn. They know we are here. They have known for a multitude of human time. Yet they still come and watch. In this sky they know only a few will see them and it is here they choose to expose themselves to those few.


You have watched their ships come closer over time; watched them land on the desert floor. They have made themselves visible to you and you were not afraid. Their shape and form was different yet not one to be described as ugly or grotesque. In their presence, you could sense both their curiosity and their humanity. Though powerful in their own way and obviously learned beyond the mind of man, they are still fascinated by some aspect of that which makes up the earth. That fascination brings them back to the skies of Arizona to observe.


There are those who would tell of their sightings. The stories of UFO’s abound and seem to come and go like the ebb of the ocean tide. You see no value in joining that circle or attempting to convince the unknowing of anything that you have witnessed here under these stars. It has no significance to you whether they believe or even see it for that matter. This sky with all its wonder, its beauty, belongs to the Creator and it will be the Creator alone who will decide who sees and who will not. For you, it is enough to know that you are among the few who do see at this point and for that you are so humbly thankful.


Morning will come soon and the bright sunshine of day will deliver its promise once again over the land. The lizard and the rattlesnake will scurry for shade after warming themselves on the hot rocks of the night. Mother Nature will stir her cauldron adding just the right amount of each ingredient to create yet another visible phenomenon in the atmosphere of earth. You will see it through and be thankful for yet one more day with its coming night.


Starry,starry night
paint your palette blue and grey

look out on a summer's day
with eyes that know the
darkness in my soul.
Shadows on the hills
sketch the trees and the daffodils

catch the breeze and the winter chills

in colors on the snowy linen land.
And now I understand what you tried to say to me

how you suffered for your sanity
how you tried to set them free.
They would not listen
they did not know how

perhaps they'll listen now.

Starry,starry night
flaming flo'rs that brightly blaze

swirling clouds in violet haze reflect in
Vincent's eyes of China blue.
Colors changing hue
morning fields of amber grain

weathered faces lined in pain
are soothed beneath the artist's
loving hand.
And now I understand what you tried to say to me

how you suffered for your sanity
how you tried to set them free.
perhaps they'll listen now.

For they could not love you
but still your love was true

and when no hope was left in sight on that starry
starry night.
You took your life
as lovers often do;
But I could have told you
Vincent
this world was never
meant for one
as beautiful as you.

Starry,starry night
portraits hung in empty halls

frameless heads on nameless walls
with eyes
that watch the world and can't forget.
Like the stranger that you've met

the ragged men in ragged clothes

the silver thorn of bloody rose
lie crushed and broken
on the virgin snow.
And now I think I know what you tried to say to me

how you suffered for your sanity

how you tried to set them free.
They would not listen
they're not
list'ning still
perhaps they never will.


(From the song, “Vincent” – Don McLean)



©Copyright WBrown2010. All Rights Reserved.


More by this Author


Comments 11 comments

breakfastpop profile image

breakfastpop 6 years ago

This is a magnificent hub that paints a vivd picture in the reader's mind. Vincent has always been one of my favorite songs. Thanks once again for a great read. Of course I rated it up!


Wayne Brown profile image

Wayne Brown 6 years ago from Texas Author

Glad you liked it, Poppy. I think that Don McLean really created a lovely song with such beautiful words and references. I felt that it would go well with the mood and tone that I was trying to create in this hub. Thanks for your feedback!


sheila b. profile image

sheila b. 6 years ago

The sky is fascinating and humbling. I loved how you wrote of it.


Lucy 6 years ago

I recently came across your blog and have been reading along. I thought I would leave my first comment. I don’t know what to say except that I have enjoyed reading. Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.

Lucy

http://dataentryjob-s.com


saddlerider1 profile image

saddlerider1 6 years ago

Big Up from me as well. Vincent oh what a magnificent song, I remember it well. As for Arizona Skies they along with Montana skies I have witnessed on my many treks along your beautiful highways in my 18 wheeler in years gone by. When the moon was full, it felt like I could reach out and touch it. Those skies in both these beautiful majestic states were awesome. I will never forget them, I am blessed that I had a chance to ride through and enjoy the skies.


Wayne Brown profile image

Wayne Brown 6 years ago from Texas Author

Hi, Ken...thanks for stopping by and taking the time to read this one. You are so right about the sky in both of those places. When I see it and experience it I realize that our existence in this universe is but a tiny grain of sand in an infinite piling of it. Thanks for the read! WB


Petra Vlah profile image

Petra Vlah 6 years ago from Los Angeles

Dear Wayne,

The power of your words is overwhelming and the way you paint the landscape and the sky of Arizona is just great; I can see it, I can feel it I can envision myself there in the middle of the majestic land, whether populated by shadows or totally deserted. That is what I call good writing.

I don't know the song, your writing is music to my ears and that is enough for me. Thank you for a great afternoon gift of beauty


Wayne Brown profile image

Wayne Brown 6 years ago from Texas Author

Petra....thank you for your nice comments. I am really glad to hear the piece has some legs. It was off to a slow start and I was beginning to think I missed the mark.


Petra Vlah profile image

Petra Vlah 6 years ago from Los Angeles

Missed the mark? When did that ever happened to you, Wayne. You are setting the marks and raising the standards for the rest of us, that's what you do.


Wayne Brown profile image

Wayne Brown 6 years ago from Texas Author

Gee, you humble me, Petra...I should have got some training!


cosette 6 years ago

that distinctive scent is most likely creosote. i love being near Carefree, where the skies are indeed expansive and you can hear quail and doves and cactus wrens going about their business. this hub gets an A for Awesome :)

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working