Baby Boxes?

'Baby Boxes' are little, outside doors in hospital walls, not unlike our bank's outside depositories. Baby boxes allow for babies to be anonymously deposited into hospitals via an outside mailbox-type opening 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Baby boxes alert inside hospital staff to the fact that something was deposited, mere minutes after it was. Currently, these baby boxes are in legal use within Germany, Poland, the Czech Republic, Italy, Lithuania, Russia and Slovakia, Switzerland and Belgium.

It's certainly not an idea that hasn't floated through the minds of most of us at some point. Many of us, at some point while reading the news or listening to the news, have said to ourselves, 'Why wouldn't they just give the baby up to someone who could care for it?' Or 'Why wouldn't they give the baby up for adoption to people who can't have their own but would care for it?'

These baby boxes answer our half hearted, absent minded questions.

There are so many would be parents out there....making sufficient funds per annum, with lovely homes, just waiting and waiting for their chance to bring a child into their world. Just wanting nothing more than to add to their family equation by raising a child, loving a child and watching that child grow into an adult and feel that rewarding warmth that parents feel when they see their own kids get great grades, make responsible, independent decisions, choose wisely, speak and think wisely and look back at their parents with graceful appreciation for just being catered to for all those years while they learned the tools to do so with.

Baby boxes, on one hand, seem a logical solution to a very real and heart breaking problem that many responsible childless people deal with. Alas, there is always a down side and it's never so flowery as the up-side.

The number of unborn children in this world, were they born, I'm sure would astound even the most astute counters of those statistics. Our world is teeming already with an overflow of people who take more than they give. Around us, communally, and abroad, PEOPLE are being born, crowding around the universal cup of life that our planet offers to all of us, expectantly, without refilling that same cup.

When do we as a people of earth say that there is NO VACANCY?

When do we say, no, this over abundance of human population is not welcome?

Where is the line that dictates our heart's feeling of love for those that we MIGHT have loved over our desire to have a lasting world for those we already love?

I love babies. I had two of my own. I would fight hand over fist to protect a defenceless child. And I would choose my own life or the life of my mother, child, husband, or best friend over that of an someone's unborn baby any day of the week. Am I a monster?

I don't think so.

As a pro-life advocate, I'm constantly confused about what that means. I understand that pro-choice means women should be able to legally choose abortion, and pro-life means that women shouldn't be able to choose abortion. I get that.

But pro-life, to me, SHOULD mean, life already living should take precedence over life yet to be.

Baby boxes? They are a wonderful ode to the raped woman, the pregnant pre-teen, and the mother who recognizes that she cannot care for this new life, already in progress. But they are also portals of new age, political acceptance to those who may consider child birth as an 'oh well' type of commonplace event, started by two but resentfully dealt with by the global community.

Neither religion nor environment can in any way decide the righteousness of baby boxes but regardless, baby boxes are here. They are alive and thriving in some countries, and despised in others. Unwanted pregancies happen everywhere. If you had a baby that you could not care for, would you use this vice? Would you keep the child, and not provide for it?

Baby boxes....to use or not to use? To support or to loathe? Hmmm.

More by this Author

  • Greenock, Then and Now
    43

    Ann Street, Greenock, 1967 McLean Museum - Eugene Mehat My mother grew up in Greenock, Scotland. She was born there, at The Rankin Hospital, and lived in the town until she was nineteen years old. She still remembers...


Comments

No comments yet.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working