Can You Read One of These Without Welling Up?

Are you sitting comfortably? Then we shall begin.

I am delving back into my past here, and bringing forth some feelings which surfaced last night for some reason. I don’t know why, but I suddenly remembered reading stories to children in my classes when I was a teacher.

I did my best to be a good teacher; well, let’s admit it, I usually managed it. I still number ex-pupils among my very best friends, so I couldn’t have been such a monster. Some of my strengths were telling stories and reading stories. I had, for all of my teaching life, Primary School children, from eight year olds to eleven year olds. Usually the tens and elevens.

Now some of the stories that I told or read, were classics, and some were whimsy, and some were stories that I made up specifically for those particular classes or children.

If it’s a made up story, or a recounting of a familiar story, or whimsy, then it is acceptable to tell the story in one’s own words. But there are Classics, and Classics were written, obviously by authors with style, and could use nuance, and the right word for the right purpose, so it would be arrogant to try to just retell these classics.

Children’s stories fall into several categories, and it would be unwise of me to try and remember each and every one of them; I’d be bound you leave one important group out. I can say here and now, that there are some which I had to (What do I mean by “Had to”?) read. I wanted to… but, I also have to admit that I am a very sentimental person. There were some stories that I found so, so, so difficult to read without there being a catch in my voice, or plain old fashioned tears.

And here is where this seemingly interminable hub is leading.

You will know when I have to tell a very sad story, or report a very sad piece of news; it is what my friend Judi and I call the Gareth Gates Syndrome.

Who? Gareth gates is a British pop star who came to fame through Pop Idol almost ten years ago. He is a lovely singer, but has a severe stammer, and he managed to control that stammer by blowing out air just before he speaks… I employ the same when I have to deliver sad news, or to cover up that I am feeling very tearful. So when I am reading a sad story, if you watch carefully, and you see me look as if I am about to whistle, but just blow out air… there you are… it’s my covering technique.

I have in my mind, five books, or short stories, which I find I cannot read without really giving the game away. My challenge to you is:

Could you read any of these to a child or an adult, or anyone, and not be moved?

I am not giving the story away, but just telling you the part that really wipes me out:

‘The House at Pooh Corner’ by A. A. Milne

The last chapter in

‘The House at Pooh Corner’ by A. A. Milne

In which Christopher Robin gives a Pooh party, and we say Goodbye.

Pooh doesn’t really understand, but he knows that his good friend Christopher Robin must go away, but he also knows that they will live in each other’s hearts forever.

‘The Selfish Giant’ by Oscar Wilde

This lovely and uplifting story can usually be found in the collection: 'The Happy Prince and Other Stories'

‘The Selfish Giant’ by Oscar Wilde

The Selfish Giant sees the marks in the hands and feet of the Child and asks “Who did these things to you?”

‘The Incredible Journey’ by Sheila Burnford

‘The Incredible Journey’ by Sheila Burnford

When those animals come running over the horizon and their family, who had thought them perished months before, run to meet them.

I saw a whole primary school sitting and listening to the Head Teacher read this and you could hear a pin drop… she had tears in her eyes, but not one child was not caught up in the moment.

‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charles Dickens

‘A Christmas Carol’

by Charles Dickens

And Ebenezer Scrooge looks in the corner, to see a little crutch, and he says. “And what? No Tiny Tim?”

‘The Happy Prince’ by Oscar Wilde

‘The Happy Prince’

by Oscar Wilde

“Bring me the two most precious things in the city,” said God to one of His Angels; and the Angel brought Him the leaden heart and the dead bird.

I challenge anyone to read that aloud and not weep.

We all have a story

We all have a story, whether it is true, or whether it is fiction. Regardless, the truth is in our soul. I have a story I wrote once, that breaks my heart every time I read it. It is too personal to share with anybody but if I want to look deep into my soul, I read it and I shed tears. They are my own private tears, but none the less beautiful for that.

It is the way that we can relate to incidents and feeling that make us just that little more human; more compassionate; empathetic. To be able to share emotions with one other person, or with a group, is a very special and important thing. Shared passions are so much more binding than if one were to live, or attempt to live, in isolation.

So, if you can share an emotional piece of prose, or poetry, or something visual, or perhaps some music, or perhaps a favourite scene from a movie, with others, you are in danger of showing your weaknesses… but if they are weaknesses, I have my doubts. I feel they are strengths.

Laugh, and the world laughs with you?

Laugh, and the world laughs with you;

Weep, and you weep alone.

This is a quotation from a poem by Ella Wheeler. Strangely it is a quotation which almost everybody knows, yet few misquote. Nonetheless, I challenge it to be a very shallow thought. If we, as inhabitants of this planet can buy into that, then we are the poorer for it.

I prefer John Donne’s much more inspiring;

‘For Whom the Bell Tolls’

I would be churlish to select just a few words from this beautiful and uplifting poem, and here give it in its entirety:

For Whom the Bell Tolls

by

John Donne


No man is an island,
Entire of itself.
Each is a piece of the continent,
A part of the main.
If a clod be washed away by the sea,
Europe is the less.
As well as if a promontory were.
As well as if a manner of thine own
Or of thine friend's were.
Each man's death diminishes me,
For I am involved in mankind.
Therefore, send not to know
For whom the bell tolls,
It tolls for thee.

More by this Author


Comments 52 comments

donna bamford profile image

donna bamford 5 years ago from Canada

Wondreful hub twilight. I am familiar with most of your examples and share your sentimentss wholeheartedly!

Hope many read it!


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Thank you Donna. I appreciate your comment. As soon as I saw that it was you commenting, I was really pleased, and even more pleased to see what you have written. It's from the heart, as you know.

Ian


Jan Holt 5 years ago

This has brought back lovely memories of you sitting there, commanding your audience and us all mesmorised by your words! I remember only too well your fondness for the Winnie the Pooh tales, and it was our favourite too. We were so young and unaware of your sentimentality back in the late 60s, but knowing you now as a friend, but still as a mentor, I am relishing in knowing your soft side. You made such an impact on us all, for which we are eternally grateful. x


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Look at the title of my hub, Janice. I've just welled up reading your lovely comment. I think I'm going to have to add your comment to my list.

Love you,

Ian


Debbie Connell 5 years ago

This brings back memories to me, of you doing your best to teach us this poem. What patience you had? Its just it took me over 30 years to learn it, then I still had to ask you for help, but always brings a tear to my eye. Love You xxx

What is this life if, full of care,

We have no time to stand and stare?—

No time to stand beneath the boughs,

And stare as long as sheep and cows:

No time to see, when woods we pass,

Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass:

No time to see, in broad daylight,

Streams full of stars, like skies at night:

No time to turn at Beauty's glance,

And watch her feet, how they can dance:

No time to wait till her mouth can

Enrich that smile her eyes began?

A poor life this if, full of care,

We have no time to stand and stare.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Debbie, I can only vaguely remember teaching that... but I'm sure I must have lost the will to live after the first four lines. Maybe Mrs Robertson asked me to teach it. It was Molly Robertson who I described reading 'The Incredible Journey'... did you realise that?

Love you too, Debbie

x


AngRose profile image

AngRose 5 years ago

Ian,

What a beautiful thing for you to share this part of yourself with us. I feel honored to have gotten to partake of even a small part of your gift of self through this hub. And I have to say, the quote of weeping alone is incorrect...I have a hard time letting anybody cry alone in my presence. Thank you for sharing friend...it's lovely.

Angie


Reflecting Pool profile image

Reflecting Pool 5 years ago from The other side of the coop

Oh! Oh! House at Pooh Corner is a personal fave! I cry on the animal story and love, but was terrified of Christmas Carol first few times out. (Whistling)

Ok.. well shoot, you are right.. *sniff*.. now.. back to what I was doing.. hey! I wasn't doing anything! Ha! Easy!


theseus profile image

theseus 5 years ago from philippines

Hi Twilight,

We do share the same passion for books. I have read most of what you listed above. My fave is "The Happy Prince". It's such a must read and a tear-jerker as well.

Keep on writing,you have the gift.God bless.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Angie, I was so pleased to see your name and see that you had made a comment. Somehow we get to know our new friends on HP and I thought you would appreciate it. Thank you so much for reading through and your beautifully sensitive comments.

Ian


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

I'm looking deep into a Reflecting Pool and I am seeing such depths.

You doing nothing? I don't believe you for one minute. You have a mind that is working all the time, my friend. Thanks for reading my hub, and Yes! Winnie-ther-Pooh (That's right, it is written that way once in the books)... Winnie-ther-Pooh Rules!


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Hi Theseus. Yes, I know, by reading your hubs, that you love books. Thanks for stopping by and taking the time to read my hub, and for your charming comments.


AngRose profile image

AngRose 5 years ago

Ian,

You know me well already my friend. I must be honest with you, your hubs are the ones I look the most forward to. They are so well written, and filled with either your wonderful wit, or your gentle soul...both characteristics which I value greatly. Please don't ever stop writing.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Thank you, my dear friend. Comments like that keep me going, when I feel that I am not reaching anybody but myself. And that happens quite a lot at times. Bless you!


AngRose profile image

AngRose 5 years ago

I'm glad my comments help to keep you inspired to write. I honestly love to read yours. I haven't had as much energy to comment lately, with some of the things going on in my life, but I just wanted you to know that I so look forward to reading your hubs...and I read each new one you put up. And even if I don't comment I'm there clicking that vote up button! :)


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Wow. Great morning for positive comments... Thank you. You start to get into gear yourself, Angie and take care of yourself.


KKalmes profile image

KKalmes 5 years ago from Chicago, Illinois

Hello Ian, my dearest word scholar... I am never in awe as much as when I read something of you!


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Hello Kevin. It is great to hear words like that, but from you, they are so very special... You have such a lot on your plate right now, but you always are so positive about so many things. It's hearts (Eek! My verb doesn't compliment my noun) like yours that make this world a better place.


KKalmes profile image

KKalmes 5 years ago from Chicago, Illinois

Hello my friend, I was thinking as I lay in bed last night in my very cold bedroom without heat and temperatures dropping here in the Midwest, that we could do so much more with a kind word and heartfelt dialogue than the snarky, cheap shots and condescending rhetoric being bantered about.

I began to wonder if I couldn't be that voice... the one who speaks to people and not at people, respectfully and without malice.

I'm just not sure where to start!


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Dear Kevin, What do you mean by, you don't know where to start. You have started; long before I knew you. You are a kind, compassionate person. I don't know if you have reserved that for a chosen few (i.e. me and some other lucky ones) but you have been a rock and a source of inspiration since I have known you, and that is what I call being well into the journey... not just at the starting blocks.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis

I am sorry to say I haven't read all of your examples, yet I know just what you mean. I myself am a bit of a sentimental fool and become teary at the strangest things--or so it seems to others, but to me my reasons make perfect sense. I think perhaps I connect things differently, but then everyone has their own memories that they apply to things. It's the animal stories that get to me the most. Thanks for making me think.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Thanks for that, Chris. I am extremely sentimental, and will cry buckets at the final scene when the father turns to his son, and says the right thing, and the manly tears spring to the eyes of both. Credits come up on the screen. Audience starts to move out. I am sitting there unable to move, bathed in less than manly tears... you know the scenario.

But in real life, when my father left my mother and me and embraced me for the first time in my life that I can remember, I had to summon up crocodile tears.

Sorry if this has turned into an essay.

However; Give me a sentimental book, movie or poem, and yes, give me one with an animal in it, sick or well, and I blubber like the next hysterical and lachrymose person.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis

lachrymose? Ha! You wield your vocabulary like a club, and hate banged me upside my now-aching head.


Jewels profile image

Jewels 5 years ago from Australia

Of all the quotes/extractions from the classics you mentioned, this is the one that touched me the most - it was yours.

"It is the way that we can relate to incidents and feeling that make us just that little more human; more compassionate; empathetic. To be able to share emotions with one other person, or with a group, is a very special and important thing. Shared passions are so much more binding than if one were to live, or attempt to live, in isolation.

So, if you can share an emotional piece of prose, or poetry, or something visual, or perhaps some music, or perhaps a favourite scene from a movie, with others, you are in danger of showing your weaknesses… but if they are weaknesses, I have my doubts. I feel they are strengths."

Loved your hub.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Jewels, I am so flattered, so charmed, so grateful that you stopped to read, and that you enjoyed it so much. Thank you, from the bottom of my heart.


LuisEGonzalez profile image

LuisEGonzalez 5 years ago from Miami, Florida

Brings back memories of my school years. Some of these I have read and even then when I was still young I enjoyed them and became engrossed with some. Thanks for sharing


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Thank you for visiting my hub, Luis. And thank you for the comment. You are welcome, whenever you wish to delve again.


Sunnie Day 5 years ago

What a wonderful teacher you were Ian.. I read this and suddenly saw "Ian" behind all the poetry..I loved a story called The Box Car Children when I was little..came out in the 60's I believe. Have looked for it but never found it. Not the newer series but one book. Thanks for sharing.

Sunnie


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Thank you, Sunnie. I appreciate the parallels. If you ever get a chance, buy the book, 'I'll Take You to Mrs Cole' and read it to your grandson... and any other grandchildren you have. It is one of the most amusing, warm, lovely books. I used to read it and read it and read it to the children in my classes... when I wasn't reading stories I had written for them.

Have a look at "non hubbers" in comments. They are a couple of girls I taught when I first started teaching in London.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_2_25?url=se...


Sunnie Day 5 years ago

Thanki you Ian I will get it..I love to read to my grandchildren...reading to children is the best thing one could do. ;)


Mark Ewbie profile image

Mark Ewbie 5 years ago from Euroland

Twilight, as you will now be aware I am a Pooh fan, and a softie. I can't speak for the other books you mention as I am not a great reader - so this only concerns the Pooh story.

I have tried to read that without crying, and I can't. It hit me particularly hard when reading the story to my child. There I was, the man yet still a child, reading a book I had had read to me by people now gone. And those dear and precious people had read to a child now gone. And one day, soon, as indeed happened, my child will move on. Life seems very.. I don't know.. big.. sometimes.

Thanks for writing about it.


acaetnna profile image

acaetnna 5 years ago from Guildford

Wow brilliant. I simply love 'The Happy Prince' - one of my absolute favourites - and yes I still 'well' up!!! Gotta say I love the all; especially 'Winnie the Pooh'!!!


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Mark, that is one of the loveliest comments one could ever read:

"There I was, the man yet still a child, reading a book I had had read to me by people now gone. And those dear and precious people had read to a child now gone. And one day, soon, as indeed happened, my child will move on. Life seems very.. I don't know.. big.. sometimes."

It seems almost futile selecting such a large section of your writing to show what I meant, but it is so... I know there must be a word for it, but I can't think what it is, right now.

It's deep (and I didn't realise until recently that you did "deep")


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

acaetnna, it is so lovely to realise that there are so many people who do remember Pooh and all his chums, and that they are not only here, where he originated, but on the other side of the pond. Is it that we are surrounded by lovely people because HP has attracted them. or are there armies of Pooh lovers?

Regardless, I am so glad you are also (as if you could be anything else) and that you liked 'The Happy Prince'. So glad you came to visit again,

Ian


sarahmoose profile image

sarahmoose 5 years ago from Nottingham, England

This is an awesome hub! Love all of the books, the only one I've never read is The Selfish Giant, but I now intend to buy a copy! I'm just reading The BFG to my daughter who is 3, and she loves it, so I think I'll have to read her some of these now too!


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

'The Selfish Giant' is included in a book entitled 'The Happy Prince and Other Stories' (by Oscar Wilde, obviously).

I hope you enjoy reading it and your daughter enjoys it also. Some of the words are a little difficult, but the poetry of it all carries it along.


Tina 5 years ago

Brings back a lot of lovely memories of you reading stories to a group of mesmerised children (me included) huddled at your feet!

Thank you for being a great part of my life.

Love you lots.

xx


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Thank you, Tina. That was so lovely to read and to hear. Love you lots, too.

Khuda Hafiz

Me


Becky 5 years ago

I can't think of a book that brings me to tears but there is a movie "Pay it Forward". It will have me bawling even when I try not to.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

I love that movie too, Becky. The last scene is so touching. I also cry at the end.

Some of my most favourite actors are in that. In fact, I think every actor in it is one of my all time favourites.

What a cast. What direction. What a story.


Becky 5 years ago

I agree with all you have said. The young boy, I cannot remember his name, is so talented and has such a grip on his emotions in everything he does. I am very impressed with him and have to watch every movie he is in.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Haley Joel Osment. He was also in 'The Sixth Sense' and 'A.I.@ (Artificial Intelligence) one of the saddest movies I have ever seen. The final scene haunts me sometimes.


Green Lotus profile image

Green Lotus 5 years ago from Atlanta, GA

Lovely Hub, Twilight. I've read all your suggested reading and agree wholeheartedly, they are some of the best for both children (and adults). I've tossed away so many books over the years but I still have all my A.A. Milne hardcovers displayed proudly on the shelf. I also fondly recall drawing my own personal illustrations for "The Secret Giant", so you have brought back some pleasant memories. As for sharing deep stuff, it wasn't until I joined HP two years ago this month that I began to dip my foot and my pen into that private realm. One must go there with a bit of caution, the internet being what it is I'm afraid.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Green Lotus, we are just two of a kind. I imagine how inspired you must have been by the story to want to draw the Giant.

And my four Milne books are on the shelf too. In fact, one is so battered that hardly a page sits well and the cotton binding at the beck is all fray and hanging out, but to get rid of it would be to get rid of an old family member.


nemanjaboskov profile image

nemanjaboskov 4 years ago from Serbia

Yes, welling up is something I know too well :)

I can well up when reading books, watching movies or even telling a story... I always found it funny that when we are watching a movie together, my girlfriend never sheds a tear, and I am too often caught with tears in my eyes...

A very deep hub, and I particularly enjoyed reading the comments. I have a lot of teachers I will love all of my life, and I can understand your students reading and commenting here.

Enough for tonight, but I'll probably be back tomorrow to read more of my new friend's hubs :)


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 4 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Nemanja, I feel grateful and honoured to have read all your wonderful comments, and to hear that you have enjoyed my efforts.

Thank you, you have really made my day.


nemanjaboskov profile image

nemanjaboskov 4 years ago from Serbia

The pleasure was all mine, Ian - believe me :)


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 3 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Nemanja (and everybody else who was kind enough to read and to comment on this hub), I have just read this hub again, and once again, I have tears in my sentimental old eyes.

May I never change.


anonymous 3 years ago

The Happy Prince by Oscar Wilde is about kindness altruism charity love sacrifice. Its a sad story in several ways. Its sad how much cruelty exists in people. The Happy Prince is not happy but sad. The Swallow sacrifices its life. The poor Swallow dies from cold and starvation when it could have migrated to Egypt. The Swallow chose to remain with the Happy Prince and they both did all they could to help the poor. The Happy Prince and the Swallow are two of the kindest characters in fiction. There is no finer moral tale than the Happy Prince.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 3 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Dear anonymous, thank you for your visit. i hope you see my reply. I agree with your thoughts on this story, and am always uplifted when reading it and having read it. I find it a "killer" to read aloud to children, and probably would be as bad to read it to adults, because it tugs at my heart strings so powerfully.


anonymous 3 years ago

Dear Twilight Lawns The Happy Prince by Oscar Wilde is morally superior to any other story I know of. The Happy Prince and the Swallow are two of the kindest and most loving characters in fiction. But its not very realistic as it is 1) ascribing human traits and emotions to a talking statue and a talking animal and 2) its morals may be too hard to achieve. In real life there is almost no person that can be as kind and as altruistic as the Happy Prince. The story is very sad in several ways. Firstly its sad because the people in the city are cruel selfish and theres poverty and squalor. The Happy Prince used to be happy as in the past tense when he was a flesh and blood person who lived in a palace. While there he was spared from seeing cruelty and poverty. After he died he became a Statue overlooking the city. The cruelty ugliness and misery which he sees in the city makes him sad. By chance the kind Swallow meets him and befriends him. The Swallow sacrifices his life to be with the Happy Prince and to help him give to the poor in the city. The Swallow's death is very sad because I love songbirds. Its always sad when an innocent loving animal dies. The story is sad in other ways. When the mayor sees that the statue of the Happy Prince is stripped of its gold and jewelry they decide to bring it down and take it apart. They have no clue what a treasure the statue is whether or not he has gold on him. Its also sad that now that both the Happy Prince and the Swallow are gone things will return to as they were. In other words the poverty and misery in the city will continue once the people's gold supply runs out. Of course its implied that the Mayor will continue to be uncaring to the poverty and misery in the city. So nothing has really changed for the better. People will continue being cruel selfish and uncaring which is implied in the story. The story is heartwarming and morally uplifting but not realistic and its very depressing and bleak. Readers Digest made a lovely cartoon of The Happy Prince with the voice of Christopher Plummer as narrator. The Happy Prince is not the usual childrens story. Its morality and its two kind loving characters elevate this story above any other childrens story. I love the Happy Prince and I love the Swallow. Theres a somewhat similar story in American literature by author Jean Lively called The Flight of the Snowbird. Like the Happy Prince theres a kind bird in this story(a SnowJunco) and it takes place in a cold snowy climate in the winter. A boy named Benjy resents his autistic sister Sheryl. They go out on the ice. Sheryl accidentally falls through the ice and is saved by Benjy. The accident brings Benjy closer to his sister. Its heartwarming and has a nice ending. This story is found on the Internet and on google but there is no other information about the author Jean Lively or when this story was published. Thank you for reading.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 3 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

I read your very intimate comment, anonymous, and, as I was sitting in the car on Streatham Common on a rather lovely English summer's day, thought I would read 'The Happy Price' again, on my Kindle.

It had the usual effect, and as I came to the last few pages, the tears were beginning to well up seriously, so by the time I read,

“Bring me the two most precious things in the city,” said God to one of His Angels; and the Angel brought Him the leaden heart and the dead bird.

“You have rightly chosen,” said God, “for in my garden of Paradise this little bird shall sing for evermore, and in my city of gold the Happy Prince shall praise me.”

I was sitting with tears flowing down my cheeks, yet again.

Thank you.

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