Confidence In Spring

CXLIII.

My japonica blooming -Feb. 2013
My japonica blooming -Feb. 2013 | Source

Confidence

In depths of Winter I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer.

______Albert Camus

Reflection



Home may be
A little late this year ~
But there's no place
Like SPRING!

______© Nellieanna H. Hay




Season Into Season


Wandering among the ashes,

Soul now knows is futile.

There are firings just beginning.

Soul shall seek them out again,

Seeking the reason.


Restlessness, the quest;

Another word for life restirring,

Seeking what it needs, unending,

To grow and thrive,

To be alive.


Contentment is for rest,

Not residence.


For life is always moving,

Moving evermore, preferring

To move from shore to shore,

From here to there,

Season into season.


______© Nellieanna H. Hay


I am

The knower.

I am

The known.

Am I

The only one?


______© Nellieanna H. Hay



My heart knows.

But it's

Not telling.♥


______© Nellieanna H. Hay



Japonica snowflake by NHH
Japonica snowflake by NHH


For me

The boxes

Within boxes

Begin to fall away.


But petals

Within petals

May always

Choose to stay.


______© Nellieanna H. Hay

NHH narrating "Season Into Season"

More by this Author


Comments 101 comments

sen.sush23 profile image

sen.sush23 3 years ago from Kolkata, India

Nellie, ..that is not only beautiful poetry, but a beautiful hub, how wonderfully done- just like spring! I think I know what you mean, after traveling some and having doubts, wintry, the spring feeling does say that "There are firings just beginning.

Soul shall seek them out again"...everyday, I feel these words, and you have written them. I wish I could put them down somewhere so I may read them now and then. Oh, yes..and I am going to borrow that piece of Camus. Cheers to life, friend!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Sushmita - thank you! Of course, it's partly symbolic, as you perceived. Winter. being the more limiting in ways; Spring, being the bursting forth of dynamic life again. Both are significant, but our knowing that one will follow the other is a source of hope and confidence.

Isn't that Camus quotation marvelous! It really inspired the whole hub. I'd kept a wintry, snowy illustration and the saying from some old 2008 calendar, titled "CONFIDENCE", which fit my theme for this hub so well.

I've been a Camus fan ever since I read "The Stranger" years and years ago and remembered him from dusting the library stacks when I worked in the school library when I was a freshman in college -- (REALLY long ago - when I was 16!). At that time, I still thought his name was pronounced as it's spelled and would be pronounced if it were an English name, with the "s" sounded at the end, Like Ka-moose. haha!

Thank you for being my first and very welcome visitor!


hawaiianodysseus profile image

hawaiianodysseus 3 years ago from Southeast Washington state

Nellieanna, you take shards of words, fragments of sentences, and petals of paragraphs...and make aesthetically appealing mosaic masterpieces.

Where Dylan Thomas raged against the dying light, you--not unlike Thoreau--are civilly disobedient to it.

Thank you for gracing our lives with your literary (and now audiovisual) creations.


sen.sush23 profile image

sen.sush23 3 years ago from Kolkata, India

Oh! Yes, I know that....most french names do pose a problem for us Indians, too, as we are the colonial children weened on Wren and Martin in school. :D :D

But Camus came upon me, thankfully in my teens, and by then the mother tongue Bengali allowed me to have a clearer pronunciation initiation - you see, Bengali has all those soft t etc. like in french..:)

I love to read your hubs, Nellie, since I found them..so it was all my pleasure.


dghbrh profile image

dghbrh 3 years ago from ...... a place beyond now and beyond here !!!

So beautifully done this is ! The perspective of many faceted life and during many seasons to keep moving in the journey through the thoughts are so nicely expressed here. As you said.....so brilliantly above.....

'......I am

The knower.

I am

The known.

Am I

The only one?...'

The rhythm of unmistakable search all over in the cold of winter to reach for the warmth of undying love of spring is what makes the journey of life interesting. Thank you very much for this one. Votes all up and shared across.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Joe - Oh, my - I love that! I literally laughed out loud at "civilly disobedient to it"! I have never felt better perceived -- and that is my hallmark of any relationship, at any level! Being perceived is wonderful.

To be even in the same sentence with Thoreau, though -- well, I'm not sure my self-image can handle it! :-) You do me great honor! Thank you!

By the way, I was displeased with the audiovisual I did, using raw photos I snapped of my japonica bush, frantically trying to capture the bees buzzing around it, paying no attention to the other stuff included in the frames. However, if I captured any bees in any of them, I've yet to positively identify them! - I'd had an idea for a hub about them, if I had any.

But I just redid the whole audio-video thing with better-editted photos, from among the same shoot-crop, chosen out of 27 pix I'd snapped; then also now cropped! So if you come back, you might notice that has changed.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Sushmita, thank you for returning! That is most interesting to hear of the cultural effects of those pronunciations there.

I've gotten the impression that historically English people have taken a deliberate position of pronouncing all French words which cross their tongues in as English a manner as possible. Lots of rancorous history between those countries! There may still be signs of that there now.

I wish I were more familiar with the Bengali language. I'm not a great vocal linguist, having been quiet and preferring writing to speaking for the first half of my life! My 'ear' for them depends mostly from movies, and even the one Bollywood DVD movie I own ('Dil Se') has English subtitles, on which I must focus my attention if I'm to get anything of the plot out of it. I'm not crazy about reading subtitles, I have to admit! I should just sit back and relish hearing the spoken words and not worry about the subtitles, I think, as I do mostly in opera, and still enjoy it.

Over here, there's an odd mixture of attitudes about French pronunciations - or any other language. In Texas, where I am, there is an almost adamant determination to NOT emulate other accents, except Mexican-Spanish, which is spoken very nearby. But in fact, in this state there are at least 3 or 4 native Texas accents, stemming from the large and distinct regions of the state, including an odd combination that's almost Tex-Mex along the border!

In other parts of the U.S., I think there is as determined an attitude to be very superiorly proficient at other languages and their actual sounds.

Mine at 16 was just simply ignorance! I studied Spanish in school and was unfamiliar with French other than a few phrases heard in movies.

You're so kind to like my hubs and visit them! I appreciate it!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Deergha - that's a beautiful compliment. Thank you! I love your description of what it's about - that ". . . rhythm of unmistakable search all over in the cold of winter to reach for the warmth of undying love of spring . . . ." truly says it, & beautifully!

Compared to the winters endured further north on this continent & others, mine here in Texas are relatively mild. But I think one's blood is simply thinner after living through extremely hot summers, so that it seems quite cold anyway. I wear fur-lined boots even around the house most of the winter. Now, at 2:30 AM, I could use a blanket over my knees!

Thank you again! It's such a pleasure to hve you visit my hub!


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

I love just how lovely you have reminded us that we can have that "Confidence of Spring" awaiting its rebirth of new seedlings out of that cold dead earth. Oh, how I am looking so forward to Spring and all its glory, with all of its beauty and intoxicating smells.

This write is exquisite as Spring itself.

Thank you.

Voted up ++++ and sharing

God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper


livingsta profile image

livingsta 3 years ago from United Kingdom

Beautiful poem. Spring is not far away, the buds of the cherry blossom and the few daffodils here and there have already made me smile. Thank you for this beautiful hub Nellie!

Voted up and sharing!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Hello, sweet Faith. It thrills my heart to have stirred reminders of the new growth and life just around the corner! Spring itself (and all the seasons which literally make life possible on this hunk of rock whirling around in space) is so worth anticipation and gratitude, and also - It's so symbolic of all of life's promises and opportunities to 'bloom' right where we are now and be all we can be too

Thank you so much, Faith! Your comments are beautiful - just like you.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Livingsta, hello - I'm pleased that you've come to my hub and responded to it! I also have noticed some fruit trees in bloom here in Dallas - no cherry blossoms, though. Pears and peaches. They're lovely. Oh, yes -daffodils, tulips, irises. Before long we'll have redbuds and then crepe myrtle blooming. Later, magnolias. It's a wonderful time of the year. They make me smile, too! Your visit here makes me smile. Thank you.


dreamseeker2 3 years ago

Awesome poetry once again, Nellieanna. I loved the video with you reading one of your poems. Takes me to a restful place in spirit and on such a pretty morning too. Thank you! : )


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Gwen, Thank you. I'm glad you're having a pretty morning/day & that my hub promotes it. :-)

It's a really balmy day here, - slightly cloudy, quite windy and mild. Tomorrow, however, will be another story. Our see-saw winter/spring pattern is in full swing! We jump from freezing to balmy at a blink. But it's OK.

I'm remembering this declaration: "It's all chicken", agreeably said by my early playmate, Barbara Ann, when given one of the less-desirable pieced of the Sunday feast! Such a lovely attitude has followed her all her life and at 78, she is as beautiful & precious as she was at age 6. Attitude really does matter!

Speaking of attitude, yours is always lovely, m'dear. You deserve to be in a restful place any time you need it! Hugs, dear friend.


travmaj profile image

travmaj 3 years ago from australia

Beautiful words to welcome Spring after the harshness of winter.I adore spring and all the awakenings it brings. This is also a reminder of our own attitude to life - our internal winter or spring - I particularly like your words -' My heart knows but it's not telling.' voting up and beautiful,


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida

Albert Camus said so much in so few words in that short quote. And so have you, Nellieanna, with your sweet profound poetry and original graphics. Thank you for this treat.


christopheranton profile image

christopheranton 3 years ago from Gillingham Kent. United Kingdom

I love the design of your hubs Nellieanna, all the little pictures complimenting your beautiful poetry. Thanks for another gem.


SidKemp profile image

SidKemp 3 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

"Petals within petals" . . . thanks for helping restore my confidence in a day lost to Spring Fever!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Travmaj- oh, yes. The awakening of spring corresponds to our life attitudes churning around inside. Good point!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Dr. BJ - That's become one of my favorite quotes! It keeps speaking truth to me! Thank YOU for the treat of seeing you and reading your lovely comments!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Christopheranton, my friend - thank you.I"m so pleased you like my designs. You're most welcome to pluck a gem!

Now I know my hub has passed muster! :-)


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Hello, Sid! ". . . helping restore (your) confidence in a day lost to Spring Fever!" What a great image that conjures up! And a very pleasant thought to close my day. :-) Thank you!


Mhatter99 profile image

Mhatter99 3 years ago from San Francisco

I was telling a fellow hubber how the birds around here were already singing spring's song. And now another one. ;)


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 3 years ago from United States

This is another great example of the beautiful poetry your write. I love the way you laid out the page with the beautiful flowers and the video was awesome. Spring is just around the corner where I live, and it is a beautiful time.


ImKarn23 profile image

ImKarn23 3 years ago

"Contentment is for rest, not for residence"...omg..

i am in need of some of your amazing strength this morning, my friend...

i really do..

this is as beautiful as you are, Nellieanna - i am ready for a new spring...

voting up and sharing on!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

When I saw you'd visited, I thought the same thing: - that the birds are joined by yet another bright spring song - from Martin!

Thank you so much!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Pamela, you are so kind, my dear. These flowers grace my view out my kitchen window from sometime in February till it gets too warm for them in March sometime, when their green leaves begin to come on. They give me such pleasure, I just had to share them! Thank you! - We'll all have our Spring soon! Hugs.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Leslie - sweet Leslie. I'm so pleased to see you this blustery, chilly March morning full of sunshine. ~ You're a breath of air! I'm preparing to go talk to an attorney about ranch business, so before I leave the house, wanted to let you know I'm happy to hear from you. Was thinking about you and that I've not been to your site in a day or so! I'll fix that soon!

Thank you and big hugs!


wayne barrett profile image

wayne barrett 3 years ago from Clearwater Florida

Very beautiful, Nellieanna. I find myself searching for your work when I see the days hubs. I am so glad I found this one today.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 3 years ago from California

You put together such beautiful hubs! I am starting to feel the pull of spring--and for me that always means mucking around in the dirt---rain is on its way and will be here tonight---and i will listen to its message--thank you for brightening my day!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Wayne - that's one of the nicest compliments my work has ever received! Thank you! I so love making the hubs. If time were no consideration, I'd probably barrage the pages with bunches of them!!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Audrey - Thank you! How lovely that you like my work!

I grew up where Spring came earlier; in fact some years it was spring-like all winter. So I tend to get really antsy for it in February! I've been known to start wearing voile or organdy dresses in February. haha Now, who even wears dresses, much less of those fabrics?

This year in Dallas, we've had days of spring-like weather and then days of chilly wintry weather. Today is on the chilly, very windy side, making the wind-chill in the 30s. Yesterday it reached 87 degrees F!!

But all the days are good. I look for the bright sides! There always are some!


ahorseback profile image

ahorseback 3 years ago

Nellieanna !

I have decided this year

I will not await the seasons

I will arrange my own calender

I have my own reasons

Winter is my friend you see

summer my least enjoyed

Autumn and I are the closest

of friends spring finds me annoyed

Oh well If I had my way you know

the changes I'd refuse

Just changing up the calender

Im so damned confused


carolinemd21 profile image

carolinemd21 3 years ago from Close to Heaven

This is gorgeous Nellieanna from the words to how you carefully designed the poem. Beautiful. :)


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Oh, Ed - this is so good; but I can't agree that you're confused! Or, if so, me too, - because I find much in common with your words. Autumn is my most favorite season for many reasons, the biggest is that it brings relief to the super-hot Texas Summer. Winter, I get through, - by wearing fur-lined boots & double-layer sweats even in the house, plus sleeping under 2 layers of down comforters on my bed! :-) Spring is a bit messy. I suspect it's a relief for super-cold Winters in places, though. In fact, I've lived in Indiana where those never-ending frigid winters were finally over when Spring came.

The bottom line is, I love them all because they make up the days of life, and I'm really in favor of it! Were it not for the tilt of the planet which brings about the seasons from cold to hot, from extremes to mild, - neither would there be conditions bearable to living things, both plants & animals. It's all related in the system.

You're a truly great writer and person, dear Ed. Thank you for contributing to my thoughts with yours! Hugs.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Carolinemd - thank you!! What a lovely comment! I'm delighted that you came by my hub site!


Deborah Brooks profile image

Deborah Brooks 3 years ago from Brownsville,TX

My dear Nellieanna.. how are you my favorite and sweetest poet???.. you are simply awesome as usual.. simply beautiful I want spring Nellieanna.. .. LOL.. you put me in the mood for sure

sharing my dear

Debbie


SilverGenes 3 years ago

I began your hub by playing the music and then found myself lingering over the lines of poetry, wanting the lines to last. "Contentment is for rest, Not residence." And so I moved on to your video and felt as if I'd had a visit with you in your garden. "Petals within petals..." :-)


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Debbie, Thank you for stopping by!! Always a great pleasure.

Thank you for asking! I'm fine - managing to deal with shifts from 88 degrees high yesterday and today dipping way down in the lower 40s with 50 mph wind gusts making the wind chill literally penetrating! But, we know - Texas. I remember when I was younger we used to speak of "Blue Northers" - when those temperatures tumbled in just a few hours - or minutes sometimes. Keeps us on our toes!! Have you ever heard that term?

Spring is teasing us! haha.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Alexandra, what a treat! So happy that you visited this hub! Isn't George Winston's music magical? There's one of his seasonal pieces about Autumn which George & I loved so and used to play when we were camping at Lake 'O The Pines toward the end of the camping season. It seemed to meander through the trees and across the water as though it were written for the moments there. Other campers who caught its notes would come ask us what it was.

How delightful that you enjoyed my amateur video! I can well visualize our visiting in the garden, sipping a cup of ginger tea, perhaps - and conversing like two old friends, hungrily! I've always so enjoyed our mini-conversations on the comment threads over the years I've known you, - almost as long as I've been on HP; - soon to be 3 years, even though my profile still says 2 years. Oh well, I've published 206 hubs and it still says I've published "at least 100 hubs" - haha. Well, that's no lie, either. I've been here 2 years and have published at least 100. haha. This happens to be the 143rd all-poetry hub I've published. (Since I no longer have ads on my hubs, perhaps I've just dropped out of sight at HQ.)

Thank you for your notice! This is what I live for: my dear friends and real fans taking a moment to really read and ponder; not for all that other stuff! It lifts my heart, and I thank you.


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 3 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

These are true gems. Your stage production is so gifted.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

NOW I've been properly gifted - with your lovely comments! Thank you, Mike!

Hugs!


empire mike profile image

empire mike 3 years ago from empire, colorado

i came home from work today , the sun still up, the wind very relatively "calm." temperature in the 50's. nicest day in 4-5 months. though "springtime" is still a couple of months away here, and this and next are the snowiest months in this clime, i was able to touch the hope of life returning beneath the snow and within my hibernating soul. i open your pages of touching and captivating words and see pictures of the japonica which have resurrected every year since my childhood...for the last half century. thanks, my love...for i truly needed that.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

My Michael! I'm delighted on many levels to find you were here! I'm quite visual and can truly 'see' the scene you encountered coming home today - which you describe so well. It's exactly to what Camus referred in the beginning quote which inspired this hub for me.

And now I find these exquisite breathtaking lines of resounding delight: -

". . . .the hope of life returning beneath the snow and within my hibernating soul. . . . ." is poetry. It could carry an entire hub by itself! At the least, it could nourish one.

". . .the japonica which have resurrected every year since my childhood . . . . for the last half century. . . " - also sketches a familiar view in my mind's eye. These blossoms have now graced my senses, too, with their gorgeous promise of spring for some 27 February appearances, always faithfully on schedule as they were when you beheld them each of all those years before mine. I literally fight for those scrawny bushes if anyone even thinks of cutting them down when they're out of bloom, - which has happened with some who do some yard work! They know better now!

Now at this moment, my heart's response can do no better than to simply echo your words: - 'for I truly needed that.' It is so satisfying to be in sync and reminded! Thank you, darlin'! I'm smiling!


Monis Mas profile image

Monis Mas 3 years ago

Beautiful and interesting... And you know what else is beautiful? Your soul, dear Nellieanna! Spring is just around the corner!!!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Thank you, dear Monis Mas. I have been over reading some of your hubs - they're outstanding. I've planned to visit before and your kind visit here reminded me, happily. (And I love the Happiness one!)

Hugs!


Rolly A Chabot profile image

Rolly A Chabot 3 years ago from Alberta Canada

Hi Nell... thank you for this and I so love the personal touch of reading for us. We are all restless waiting for it to arrive... well done indeed.

Hugs from Canada


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Rolly, I'm delighted that you came by to visit my hub and leave your comment. So true - we wait for the Spring! I'm aware that you in Canada have longer to wait. My stepson in Colorado reminds me of the difference in weather! Thank you and hugs back!


MrsBrownsParlour profile image

MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

I loved every piece of this. George Winston is my favorite composer and that song is absolutely perfect. It is always startling to find that someone sees the same beauty. I truly appreciate your work, Nellieanna.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Lurana - you write the loveliest comments. Thank you!

My beloved George and I often played George Winston when at Lake o' The Pines camping. From our extensive collection of his work, our most favorite was Autumn. (You probably know it , but just in case. . . )

http://youtu.be/MnE6QyL_tF0

When we played it, -not loudly - but so it sort of wafted among the trees, neighboring campers asked what is was, it is so beautiful. I'm with you on the delight to find a kindred spirit in loving something beautiful! George Winston isn't so generally known.


MrsBrownsParlour profile image

MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

I do love "Autumn" very much and try to mention George Winston to others when possible because he is wonderful. Thank you for sharing that memory---I can imagine how beautiful it sounded outside like that!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Oh, yes - it was almost other-worldly. Thank you for reminding me of the specific memories of it and all the associated memories there in that magical setting.

I believe my stepson may have brought George Winston to our attention so many years ago; - so it's possible to successfully introduce it to receptive people!

There were other similar New Age sounds 'out' then - Yanni, Enya, Kitaro & collected samples of their music. But George Winston stand out from all of them. I have quite a few of his CDs.

I'm such an eclectic music lover. . . I respond individually to songs, genres, artists, more than to an entire type. You?


MrsBrownsParlour profile image

MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

Yes, I like many different types of music too! I listen to individual songs too, even in the genres I don't like as much. Sometimes just the musical quality of one little piece of a song makes me love it.

I listened to (and played on the piano) a lot of New Age music for a while, including Enya and Kitaro and Windham Hill artists. I even saw Yanni in concert once. Suzanne Ciani is one that I like a lot: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-Iu5WieAPg

David Lanz is another one, and his "Cristofori's Dream" is one of my favorite New Age songs: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q7mgrcULIbs

I have always thought of George Winston as being in a class of his own too. I am a musician but not a musicologist, so I do not have the vocabulary to describe it perhaps, but he does not do quite as many repetitive "mood" sections as other New Age artists---he is more classical, and yet also more like acoustic folk music.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Hi, Lurana! You've introduced me to some New Age artists of whom I was unaware! I'll check them out!! Thank you for including some links! I've played piano all my life (or since I can remember) and am not a real expert, but have a keen sensitivity to music itself My early training was all about classics, as was normal, but my older sibling who played always had sheet music for current songs she liked to play, which introduced me to playing "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes", "It Can't Be Wrong" & others of that generation. At the same time "Boogie Woogie" was "big" & I just didn't have the expertise & timing to play that rhythm, though I tried anyway & still have some sheet music I bought for the purpose.

My beloved George was 10 years my senior & "we" shared a lot of favorites from his hoopla times in the late 30s & all the 40s, though he kept up with change well.

"My" time was later & blossomed in that interim between the real "Big Band" music of The War Years & the 60s when R&R came along. I loved "Tenderly", "You Belong To Me", "Ebb Tide" & others of that genre. I wasn't a big 50s 'hip-hop' fan, though. Always liked the 20s musical composers like Cole Porter, Jerome Kern, Gershwin, etc. who were revived with an updated beat; I loved those. My most favorite songs were "All The Things You Are" & "Night & Day" from Kern & Porter. Both songs just haunted me.

But I love all music so much, I always have a bunch of favorites. I liked Elvis but was removed in a way from the music scenes of the 60s & early 70s but always collected records of songs I knew to collect. There were many favorites from those years. I adore James Taylor, Carole King, The Carpenters - & many others too numerous to name.

Anything written by Burt Bacharach, I love. Many of these musical numbers required me to really work to 'get them' on the piano. One day, though - (coincidentally after my first marriage ended!) I suddenly could get their slightly off-beat stuff. Taylor's is written for guitar, so it's not too easy to play properly on the piano, anyway. I'd learned to play Bacharach's "Wives & Lovers" earlier but its syncopation is very regular, not many deviations.

I' ve always had a lot of beloved classic favorites, too & some outstanding adaptations of classical selection to 'pop' songs, like the themes from 'Elvira Madigan' & 'Somewhere In Time'. It's why I have so many records and CDs!! haha I've an affinity for some Latin music, too, both classical & popular; & there are some Country singers & pieces I like. My favorite country singer is Vern Gosdin.

One favorite since I discovered him years ago is Rod McKuen, (who's hard to classify) - I love his poetry, music compositions and even his raspy voice. Speaking of raspy- I've just discovered and fallen in love with Leonard Cohen!

I'm not drawn to heavy metal or rap, but as you say, there are a few rare exceptions I like. too. As you say - there are some real musical qualities which shine forth & grab me. But anything that strikes my ear as 'noise' or torture -- -uh uh. haha.

I was drawn to New Age in the 80s, - - - especially to the ones I knew. Like you mention - some of those NA artists have make a genre of 'monotony'. haha. George Winston keeps it interesting and so very listenable. Yes - folk music has a special charm. I love Eva Cassidy, whose music had a tinge of folk. There are several folk artists I've admired over the years, along with some who lean toward Jazz, like Diana Krall and Ella. I could listen to them all day and all night.

Oh - I could go on and on! I'll try to spare you!

Thank you for such a fun discussion! Do you know MartieCoetser? She is in South Africa, one of the Dutch 'natives' and is a very knowledgeable musician. She has been doing a series featuring some of her close Hubber friends as playing instruments she chooses and fully discusses in a most engaging and educational way - to be in a cyber Wind Orchestra. She assigned me one of my favorite instruments (which I couldn't play on a bet!) - the flute! It's such fun to follow this series. She adds one each month & so far, there are 6 instruments in our growing orchestra. Each one is carefully detailed itself and also why it suits the person.

http://martiecoetser.hubpages.com/hub/The-Flute-pl


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

I was so busy writing my own musical history I neglected to tell you how much I love the videos , songs and artists you shared with me. They'll be enjoyed a lot! What a gift and a find!


MrsBrownsParlour profile image

MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

Nellieanna---I am about to start driving back from PA to IL between tonight and tomorrow but I will write back soon when I can really concentrate on a thoughtful reply! Quick reply is that I love George Gershwin and Cole Porter and Carole King and James Taylor and many of the others and some of the songs you mentioned. I want to listen to the unfamiliar ones too. We do have a lot in common. :-) Talk to you soon!


Vincent Moore 3 years ago

Moving from winter to Spring is beautiful indeed. I long for the warmth of the sun again on my cheek, bidding farewell to the cold and the snow for yet another year. The sounds, smells and frolic of all of natures beauty springs eternally with each budding plant. I am alive again, the bones, and blood work in unison and a spring is in my step. I welcome Spring and you my dear bring it on with fervor with your choice of music, audios and of course enchanting poetry from your soul. You are one with each season and your choice of words so delicate with balance. You cherish each season and claim it in voice, I am so pleased to read your work. Hugs


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Lurana - Do have a safe journey. Hopefully traffic will be mild. I'm glad you felt a kinship with some of my music favorites. Your reply is quite gratifying. It reaches a 'spot' to discover similar tastes in something as important to one's soul as music!

I'll welcome your comments in any amount when you have time and inspiration to share them!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Ah, my dear Vincent! What a pleasure to hear you speak of your awakening and renewal with the blossoming promise of Spring. I've lived where Winter held sway for long and intense parts of the year, (though not as much as yours, surely), and much as I enjoy it in smaller doses, I truly can't see how I'd ever bear it in such intensity again! My parents came from "the frozen north", as mother called it. Each of them had a comment about it. Dad said he 'wouldn't go back to Indiana to live if they gave him the whole damn state' and Mother said she was sure she wouldn't have survived much longer if she's stayed up there. She had asthma up there which disappeared when she moved down here. I sort of agree with both of those statements for myself, though I didn't have asthma! Other things about it might have done me in! Dallas has just enough winter to suit me, and while the hot summers are fierce, they suit me better than those intense winters and all they involve.

But, yes, I am one with each season when it's in progress. Or should I say, I'm at one with the moment in progress with its own characteristics and opportunities to be alive!

\I wouldn't prefer to live in a seasonless place. To quote Gibran's words, ". . . the seasonless world where you shall laugh, but not all of your laughter and cry, but not all of your tears. . . ." It would be like that to have always balmy weather or always cold or always hot. My spirit needs the seasons, though favoring the warmth.

Your pleasure in reading my words is met by mine in hearing yours say so!! Thank you.


MrsBrownsParlour profile image

MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

Nellieanna---The first time I heard many of my favorite songs and artists was through the Muppet Show. That's my generation! :-) I clearly remember the first time I heard "You've Got A Friend" with Vincent Price singing it---I had to be younger than 7 based on which house I was in---and it spoke so clearly to me that I thought he was talking directly to me. I still have a place in my heart for him because I thought he was my friend as a child!! :-)

I also remember the Muppet mummy version of "Night and Day" which is one of my favorite songs too! The Muppets & Loretta Swit did Carole King's "I Feel the Earth Move" with an earthquake scene....and there were so many others. One of my favorite songs in the world is "For What It's Worth" by Stephen Stills; it went straight through my heart with the Muppet animals & hunters acting it out.

I agree that James Taylor's music doesn't always translate from guitar to piano...but "Fire and Rain" is one of my all-time favorite songs to sing & play. I was lucky enough to see him in concert. It was so telling that he was able to stand there dressed in a pale denim shirt and jeans, sometimes just solo on acoustic guitar, with no crazy special effects or gimmicks, and yet captivate a huge audience...his music and talent are more than enough.

I love Broadway-era music and the most fun I've ever had working was as an accompanist for musical theater productions (high school and community theater) because that style of music is just so vivid and sing-able. I could list so many beautiful ones...

Kern, Porter, Gershwin, Bacharach (also great!), Carole King and James Taylor are all amazing songwriters---not just singers or instrumentalists, but craftsmen of poetic lyrics and beautiful melodies. Another singer/songwriter I love is Billy Joel---his music is varied and so enjoyable to play on the piano because it was written by a pianist.

The only song I know by Rod McKuen is "Jean" but I absolutely love it, and it is special to me because my middle name is Jean. I also love Leonard Cohen! If you like raspy voices, you might also like Tom Waits. He can sound different on different songs, but this one is a classic of his: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ov7-Ujz1ecs

"Somewhere in Time" is one of my favorite movies, and the music from it is partly why. :-)

I had never heard of Eva Cassidy but just listened and her voice is lovely!! I also like Ella and could listen to Billie Holliday all day. You might like Norah Jones if you don't know her yet: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tO4dxvguQDk

I love syncopated rhythms and boogie-woogie too (my favorite to play is the "Bumble Boogie", a variation on the Flight of the Bumblebee, and it's a really challenging piece).

I know very few country artists (one of my lesser-favorite genres) but I just checked out Vern Gosdin and his voice reminds me of Kenny Rogers, who I love---some of Kenny Rogers' songs could make me cry each time I hear them.

I also don't usually like harsh music, but there are some songs or artists in the rap & heavy metal genres that I can appreciate. "Rage Against the Machine" (not sure which genre) yells practically the whole time, but they are angry about all the right things in my opinion, and I love their rhythms and style :-). On the other hand, Eminem's political/social messages are often against mine BUT I can't help but love his lyrical abilities and songwriting skills. This song of his is one of his most popular and also my favorite: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TADyXC2K0g

Songs that have a minor key have a good chance of appealing to me. :-)

I could also go on and on...but here's one last one for now (and I include all the links just in case you are interested---I know they are time-consuming). I only know it because of the movie "Moulin Rouge" (which I love), but it has an interesting history. Its writer, Eden Ahbez, was a unique beatnik-hippie poet. Nat King Cole was the first one to record it. It is hauntingly beautiful. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5IzRYyv5q0

I did have a safe journey, so thank you! Time to catch up.....:-)


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

OH, Lurana - what an exciting reply! Thank you for taking time to answer so thoroughly & appealingly.

I'm just amazed - would never have even thought of it! - that the Muppet Show introduced songs in such a memorable and well-done way! I only have ever seen the Muppets as guests on other shows. I just missed out on their regular kids' shows.

Now - Vincent Price singing "You've Got A Friend" - wow. That reminds me of my surprise first time hearing Meryl Streep singing "What a Wonderful World" and other songs.

I mostly experienced Vincent Price as one of the horror movie actors, along with Boris Karloff and others of that ilk earlier on, you know. A 1946 film noir adaptation of the Anya Seton novel which I'd read over and over as a teen, "Dragonwyk", starred Vincent as the evil Nicholas Van Ryn. He was a most versatile actor, though & played in all genres. I think he even did a comedy with Abbott and Costello.

I thought I could reply fully & properly but it's after 2:30AM and I know if I don't rein myself in, I'll be up the rest of the night delighting in this! I don't want to rush it, so it's my time to request finishing my reply in the light of day. I've been too prone to staying up all night, all the next day & into the next night. It's a habit I break & then backslide, but it's not going to help me live to 100!

I love my sleep, have no problem sleeping. Just have a problem lying down! It began when I was a child, still sleeping in my youth bed with the high sides! I'd sneak a book & my little battery powered lantern under the covers to read after lights out. Even then I loved my sleep but hated to have to waste so much valuable time on it! haha. That and other book-seeking habits let my parents to enroll me in a one-room, 8 grades private school when I was 4 1/'2.

I can't wait to get back and savor your delightful reply & hear the music selections. Thank you - I'll be back! Don't give up on me! G'night, my dear friend.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

As promised - I'm b-a-c-k! One of the obstacles was a problem with playing u-tubes, which have been playing erratically. Very annoying & will take this in to the Apple Store, soon as I can find time. Dedided to chug up my old computer just to listen to your music selections; then came back here to reply, since the old one is slow.

I love "I Feel the Earth Move". Can picture it backed with an earthquake scene, though it's not really the vision the song normally inspires for me. hehe.

I played 'Night and Day' sorta by ear (not my usual mode) & it was "our' song with my first true love from 7 years old, blossoming seriously in our late teens, though with life's little eccentricities, 'we' didn't work out. We each married others, then 35 years later, became friends again & with our spouses, too, till he died in 1984. A very poignant memory.

Ah - I'll need to look up "For". I don't recognize it, though I know of Stills and Nash. Could the full title be, "For What It's Worth"?

Oh, yes, James Taylor's self-effacing manner and delivery gave it more, not less, stature. He's still up there commanding admiration and affection without making himself a 'big deal'. HE is definitely "enough". I have a song-book of his tunes which I learned to play pretty well.

"Fire and Rain" is definitely one of my most favorite JT songs, but I love "Sweet Baby James" almost as much. It occupies a little spot in my memories with George. We called each other "Sweet Baby" and I started it from my liking that song. George always tried to claim authorship, though. Our 'arguments' were usually about such non-serious things! haha. We'd spar on and on, neither wanting or needing to 'win'. It was just fun. Another phase of it was which of us was SB1 or SB2. Each claimed the other one was SB1, & each signed cards as SB2. haha

I love Billy Joel, too. I'm especially fond of the sound and message of "Just The Way You Are" & play it on piano from a book of collected music from that era. I like "She's Always A Woman" & "New York State of Mind", too; but don't have the music for them. I play every note I play (unless I'm totally improvising) by reading the music: a result of extreme stage fright at a recital for which I was well prepared but just turned to jelly when I walked out to play.

Rod McKuen's list of lovely songs he's written is amazing. "Jean" is lovely - he wrote it for the movie, "Prime of Miss Jean Brodie", starring a much younger Dame Maggie Smith. Good movie, btw. McKuen's music is either very sensual or quite simple, animal-&- earth-loving. It's like his poetry. He's written for several academy award movies and hit songs for major singers. His voice is softly raspy, though I've read that he was a choir boy till he had some sort of voice damage. Like Frank Sinatra, though - the damage was an improvement -gave each of them unique sounds. Frankie was just another typical singer till he had a voice problem.

Hm - I thought I knew Tom Waits but was mistaken. I'm ambivalent about his sound. I listened to "Just the Right Bullets" & wasn't drawn to it, but listened to some other of his music. Background music on many of them is especially lovely - but his voice doesn't always fit. I thought I'd love "Invitation to the Blues" but wasn't swept away. I liked "Blue Valentines" better. I love the song "Somewhere" but his rendition seemed somehow contrived & with no justification. But I l really liked a couple of tracks which I heard from his 'earlier years' album: - "I Want You" and "Blue Skies"

I do know Norah Jones. I believe it was one of my stepsons who introduced me to her sound. "Don't Know Why" is my favorite of hers, too.

"Eminen" is as appealing as any rapper, and of course they all have strong messages - what else? haha. I'm just not a great rap fan. But the title "Rage Against the Machine" strikes a note. Lewis Mumford wrote a series of books called "The Myth of the Machine". I read two of them, "Technics and Human Development" and "Pentagon of Power" in the 60s & 70s. I was so impacted by them, and at a time when my own survival was threatened. Among several books which were very valuable in their own right and to me personally. I was so in sync with them. Eminem expresses his connection in that way.

I remember "Bumble Boogie". I've never attempted to play it or "Flight of the Bumblebee". I know my limitations! ;-)

Country isn't my top favorite genre either. But I have some singer in it I like, Kenny Rogers being one, as well. Vern has a sort of 'presence' like James Taylor, which is just his own talent without a lot of theatrics. His main fame was understated, too. He was often the 'country singer' in the background of a movie, though he had his own gigs too. When he teamed with Janie Frickie, it was magic. http://youtu.be/JgHYjFkprNg. That one is more a duet than some. Sometimes she's like an accompaniment, almost a layer of his voice.

I enjoy minor key music too. Somehow it's all the more haunting.

Now you're not going to believe this but as soon as you mentioned the song sung by Nat King Cole, though I didn't know any of its other background, I knew it would be "Nature Boy" - one of my favorites of NKC's. He was a very big singing star in my prime day and it was such an outstanding piece. I'm so happy to know more about its ' hippie=beatnik' origin!

Like you - there are more and more to bring out of the music treasure trove! I just can't get "Someday Soon' by folk singer Judy Collins out of my head. I associated it with my first true love, remembering how he'd loved his damned old (amateur) rodeo as much as he loved me (more in fact) when he was 14 and I was 12. It doesn't all fit but always brought him to mind when I heard it in 1969, at least 17years after I'd actually seen him.

How pleasant to exchange and share some of our own favorites, I'm sitting here thinking of tune after tune. I've a lot of them on my iPhone & listen to them regularly. Love the convenience!


ahorseback profile image

ahorseback 3 years ago

All this talk about music , Nellieanna , check out Johnny Hartmann....."Hartmann For lovers ! I have never heard a more haunting voice ! "Doe Eye's"...... His music was featured in "the bridges of madison county "....sooo worth listening to !.......Great big hugs Nellieaana !


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

ps - Lurana, we needn't feel compelled to respond to each and every comment in full measure. We'd soon either tire of it or find it imposing on other things (or both!) ! So - just don't feel on the spot now. It's not an obligation or a matter of etiquette. We know each other well enough & share ideas enough to just let it flow. Hugs.


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Ah - ED - Thank you! I'll check it out! I loved the movie, "Bridges of Madison County". The music was so fitting to the action that I barely recall it separately. It must have been perfect. Maybe I'll watch the movie this evening!


ahorseback profile image

ahorseback 3 years ago

When you hear that low low voice you will think oh my god ! How did I not know him ! Of course he's gone now but what a life story !.....perfect waltzing music Nellieanna ! Umm , would you like to dance ?....Ed


MrsBrownsParlour profile image

MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

I also like Bridges of Madison County---I enjoyed the book before the movie came out. I really like Meryl Streep in everything I have seen of her.

Nellieanna, Thank you for each memory and song; I am taking them all to heart. Thank you also for acknowledging that it is freeing to write and comment as time & inspiration allow! I will come back to this thread with different thoughts.

My first thought was to look up that Vincent Price Muppets song, and seeing it as an adult made me wonder why I wasn't scared of him (I must have been feeling really down and troubled)! I think the lyrics and melody come through even with his Phantom of the Opera-esque version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Jv2zkYCjxI

I like Vincent Price a lot and think I might have seen that Abbott & Costello show--I used to watch them. He also had a cameo part as the talking mirror in Faerie Tale Theatre's version of Snow White. (Faerie Tale Theatre is Shelly Duvall's series of campy fairy tale remakes with an amazing list of famous actors).

It's a pity I can't share sheet music with you easily, because I have 3 volumes of Billy Joel's music including the 2 songs you mentioned. I also have a James Taylor songbook and a Carole King one. I love your Sweet Baby James story :-).

It's funny because I really like Tom Waits and his voice but not one of his songs has ever grabbed me as a favorite. He just has such an interesting gravelly voice.

I also used to read as much as possible growing up, including at night and after school...playing the piano and reading were how I spent most of my free time. Maybe that's why I'm so excited when someone shares some of those interests!

I will be back too. I'm really enjoying our dialogues. :-)


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Ed, now you've done it. Got me sitting here with tears in my eyes for the sheer beauty and sentiment of Johnny Hartman's voice and songs and what they stir in my heart. I've been listening to (and saving) several of them and know I'll go back for more.

I certainly agree that I should have remembered his voice. Several songs are so meaningful to me - "My One And Only Love" and "For All We Know", as well as the songs from "Bridges of Madison County". wow.

I would love to dance to those! When can you get here? :-)


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Lurana. I didn't read the book but I love the movie and these u-tubes with pictures from the movie are so moving, as was the movie. It's such a very tender love story, and so believable. Yes, Meryl Streep is the best. I truly think that she and Helen Mirren are the first ladies of film. I've never seen either of them in anything that wasn't superb.

That Vincent Price rendition of "You've Got a Friend" with the spooky Muppets is hilarious! I love it. What a clever spoof! I like VP too.

I played the piano almost as much as writing poetry in the 60s and 70s - and managed to get my hands on quite a few songbooks and sheet music. I had one Reader's Digest songbook with some great selections and over some of the years since, have collected quite a few others, some with decade focus, some focus on type of songs, such as "Show Tunes" and music for Christmas, classics, etc. I don't think they're still publishing them. I bought one I'd missed from e-bay and it cost much more, used, than my others did, new. The arrangements aren't concert level but are quite nice and playable. I've 11 of the books and each has about 100 songs in it, plus each comes with a little pamphlet of the song lyrics, indexed, which helps locate a specific song in the big music books, without having to get out each of those and scroll though each index. They're cross-referenced in the lyrics pamphlets, too. On each song in the music books there's a little history of it, telling who wrote it, when and by whom it was performed, which is a lovely reference. I treasure that collection. But I have two pianos and George had an organ. All the piano stools are stuffed with sheet music and smaller music books. haha. Some of the sheet music actually dates back to the 1930s when my sister collected them. Prices on them are like, 25 or 35 cents - also on some I collected early-on. Funny!

This is such fun! Hugs.


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MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

I have 2 Reader's Digest collections too! "Family Songbook" and "Treasury of Best Loved Songs". There are so many good ones---and I agree, they are at a great playable level, not too hard but not overly simplistic either. There are so many classics in there.

I love old sheet music and have some "antique" ones too. :-) My grandmother whom I never met was a professional pianist and dancer (had her own music studio and everything), and I inherited a couple of her music books---with her notes inside and everything. I treasure those above all. She also wrote poetry and so did her father; I have some handwritten ones from both of them, including one he sent her when she was a child and he was overseas in World War I. These are treasures indeed. And maybe writing poetry is a genetic inclination :-).


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Thank you for another interesting comment, Lurana!

The coincidences just keep coming. Your description of the Reader's Digest music playability is just what I usually say about it: "not too hard but not overly simplistic either." That describes it well. I think they sound better than would be expected from their relative easiness.

I'm fascinated, hearing of your grandmother's professional music careers! And writing poetry, too! I do think it may be a genetic inclination. My mother, who was an artist, didn't write poetry, but wrote very well, as did my Dad. Mother was writing her memoirs, but they're unfinished. My older siblings were good at writing & one sister wrote some lovely poetry. My brother was an engineer and did some great technical writing. His son writes haiku and is on HP as happyhal; but is inactive, with only one poetic hub publishd, a tribute to my sister who was the one who wrote poetry, following her death last May.

A couple of my granddaughters are amazing writers. I wonder if writing is as much generally taught & emphasized now, though, as it was earlier-on. Perhaps it takes the genetic inclination to bring it out now.

My precious George was quite a writer and poet himself. One son has the genes for it, but tends to curtail it. He's been on Hubpages a year & was active (empire mike), doing some outstanding work, but has been on a kind of hiatus. His hub site is still available, though. He's also an amazing photographer.


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MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

I love to hear of talents (artistic or otherwise) "running" in a family. Sometimes one can see the results of active encouragement and family culture, but other times they seem to pop up, and that's fascinating to me! In my case, my grandmother had been long gone and was not talked about much, so when I announced that I wanted piano lessons and quickly took to it, it was all my own idea. I had been playing for a couple years when my grandfather dug out her crate of music and memorabilia and I (already writing poems and loving classical music) was overwhelmed to see the connections. My parents are both musical and avid readers though, so the encouragement was definitely there too. I believe that every child has artistic potential, and wish everyone had a chance to find their voice or instrument or source of creative expression.

I looked up empire mike here and he looks like an interesting and talented writer! I also found happyhal's tribute and it is touching. I'm sorry for your loss of your sister.

Oh, I meant to mention that I also looked up your friend martie and found your online bond to be so beautiful! The link you sent me about the flute part did not work at first, so I just now found it through her profile (and commented).

There is so much talent on HubPages, I could spend all day just reading!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Hello Lurana. I discovered I hadn't posted the reply I'd written to your last comment. My computer tends to whisk away without warning whatever I write directly online, so I try to remember to write offline and then transfer it to online. I just discovered I missed that last step! (blush) Here it is:

Yes, it is fascinating if unsuspected artistic/other family traits appear. Of course, if it's genetically founded, it was "in there" all along.

One so wishes to be able to help everyone find his or her potential and it's especially heart-breaking if one sees it in someone with much against being able to follow it through.

We had some work done on our patio tile years ago. He was very nice, and his wife was a sweet. bright person. The whole family came some days while he was working. They'd sit on the patio chairs around the table which had been moved onto the grass. I became rather attached to them, bringing out snacks and beverages to share with them, inviting them inside on especially warm days.

There were a couple of sons who were just mirror images of their dad, in looks and behavior, rather average & ordinary. The pretty little girl was like the mother in looks & demeanor. It was the other son, about 11 or so, who was simply amazingly bright & had the look & bearing of keen intelligence. In their situation, it looked to be frustrating for him. I doubted they went to school, though the mother probably fairly adequately home-schooled them in basic skills. I could just see that one kid becoming an outstanding student in the arts or sciences - beyond his mother's educational level. His present interest was a strong draw to medicine. We exchanged gifts for a current holiday & we gave that boy an anatomical set with various accessories. He was ecstatic.

They didn't have much but were kind & appreciative. The guy wasn't the best handy man but was earnestly trying to provide for the family & to do a good job with the patio. We'd laid the tiles ourselves years before but had never grouted them and hadn't tiled the step. Those were the jobs he was hired to do. We had the matching tiles for it.

He brought in someone else for the grouting and it was a total disaster. It had be be fixed, & efforts to fix it smeared gunk all over our lovely tiles. Then he tried to just apply some kind of glaze over it, which didn't help the mess & further ruined the natural matte finish of the tile. I was devastated.

He tried to remove it by hand but needed a power washer, he said, explaining that his power washer had been stolen & he didn't have the money to rent one. So I went to Home Depot to see about renting one, but decided to buy it for him to have, instead of renting it. He was very appreciative, though he never got to the point of using it on our patio or on other things he was going to 'throw in' (washing the brick wall where it was grungy). The tool had been a gift to him I intended for him to keep.

About then Hurricane Katrina had hit, leaving destruction in its path in Louisiana and east Texas. They simply picked up & went down there to get in on the mountains of work repairing the damage. The payoff from the small home repair jobs we & our neighbors could offer couldn't compare with work helping to rebuild entire neighborhoods, and I'm sure it was a matter of being there in a timely way to get the jobs. These people's roots were flexible, their need was great, so it was understandable. He barely said goodbye, when I called to see when to expect his coming to work on our job. The patio is still as he left it. His effort to prepare to tile the step resulted in his cracking it so that it's buckled.

We never heard from them again; but, golly, how I've wondered what happened to that brilliant boy and the personable little girl. i nurture the hope that our influence was lasting. The other boys would likely be content to follow in the dad's footsteps, doing manual work when and where they could find it. They exhibited no interest in other areas or possibilities. It might not have been so noticeable, were it not for the contrast with that one brother. We could almost feel his frustration and resentment bubbling deep inside. I felt sure the mother understood, but was dedicated to a traditional role & life-style. She had failed to find her own true potential, I felt, - though she was obviously a great mother and example of courage in the most trying circumstances, which is no small thing. I've hoped that her influence has helped the boy and girl in realizing theirs. I'll never know.

It's an example of casting one's bread upon the waters, never knowing its fate.

I'm optimistic that 'talent will out', though, if it's not too squelched, which is more likely to happen for boys than for girls. I read of a 30-year study in which a group of youngsters were studied over that period & observed when normal family & other circumstances put significant roadblocks in their paths. Boys with high potential were discouraged & derailed by these, & didn't regain there directions, once they'd been seriously disturbed. Girls, on the other hand, even if they were giddy teenagers showing little potential, IF they 'had it' in their makeup, would invariably emerge from circumstances to seek & find their true levels.

I wish I'd kept details about the study. It was in one of my husband's scientific journals in the 1960s when he taught science. I read everything I got my hands on! It stuck in my mind but not in my backup records. It was a magazine, so didn't become a permanent part of my library. sigh.

I'm pleased that you investigated Michael's and Hal's hub sites. I'd love it if they'd resume their writing on HP, but they've their own reasons & priorities.

I'll check Martie's hub! Glad you ferreted it out. As you probably learned, she's in South Africa and quite a gal. You're so right - so much talent on here! I hesitate to recommend people to people - because there is such a rich source to find on one's own. I do seem to spend too many days just reading and writing! Other priorities are important to me but I confess that "MY" priorities don't always parallel others' for me. hehe. Luckily I'm fairly tireless and manage to get around to it all - unless it 'goes away' in the meantime! Taxes don't, however and I'm going to be turning my attention to them. I've both estate taxes and my own, including my ranch business to do. I may not have them fully done in time but I must be far enough along to be sure I'm not short of payment which would be charged interest and fees. (If I've already explained that, forgive me & ignore it. ;) I also have some legal business relating to my ranch operations. Just heard from my friend,Val, who wants us to go to several Dallas Museum of Art exhibits going on and coming up.

Of course, I tend to do more than necessary with what I'm doing and it tends to be the only thing going on in the universe for me then. One reason I do it is that it's who I am.


MrsBrownsParlour profile image

MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

Nellieanna, Thank you for sharing the story of that family; I also hope those children are able to develop their potentials. I so often wonder how many brilliant musicians the world has lost because their families were unable to afford lessons (that's the piano teacher in me coming out---I used to teach and would have begrudging students who never practiced, knowing meanwhile so many others never have the chance...the story of the world). I found the study you mentioned about roadblocks very interesting.

A ranch business, how interesting! Good luck with the taxes, they are no fun at all.

I'm somewhat of a perfectionist and I tend to overthink and overdo almost everything!


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Lurana - yes. It is tragic when any child cannot develop his/her fullest potential, whatever it is; but even more so if that potential is at a level which could benefit the world, as well.

I'm no great musician but studied piano and have loved it all my life. I practiced diligently, though I suspect with a little too much of my own preferences and not enough of the lessons'. I went through John Thompson's Third Grade book, though with lapses between the years due to the family moving and getting resettled and a fire which prevented me from playing at all. I moved on into a more advanced one, eventually, but a bad experience happened when I had prepared "Moonlight Sonata" for a recital, and it was rather good, I believe. However, when I walked out to the piano on the stage, my fingers turned to goo and my mind went blank, I was so terrified. I was about 12 and ever since can only play with the music in front of me, reading the notes. I sometimes awaken to the realization that I'm playing from memory but at that moment when I discover I'm not looking at 'my place' in the music, I'm unstrung again. It seems so silly after all these years I've gone on playing, even "Moonligt Sonata" - so long as no one is attentively listening to me play! My George gradually could sit and listen but he was very stealthy about it. He played harmonica by ear, very beautifully and sometimes would be in the next room accompanying me, which was ok, so long as I didn't really know it.

If I had musical potential - and I do have a strong sense of it - it was diluted by that silly stage fright thing. But the hours of personal enjoyment playing hours on end make up for it. I don't have to be a concert pianist to enjoy my level! Next to writing poetry, I attribute the piano with being one of my salvations. Truly.

Me, too. I tend to overthink and overdo, from both hemispheres of my brain. On the right side, it's pure pleasure to do so. So many details can be thought out even before beginning a project. On the left side, it gets the jobs done well but I purposely sometimes 'paint myself into a corner' and wait till the last minute to start, to avoid giving those less-fun projects more fine-tuning and overdoing than necessary or deserved! So - doing taxes at the 11th hour works out pretty well; - or will - if I'll go start! Actually, I collect and keep good track of everything as it occurs all year and know just where it all is. It's mostly just a matter of putting the figures on the tax returns - although there are sometimes new glitches to be addressed in new tax rules. TurboTax won't let a return be finished till all those are resolved. If they should require more time, as long as I'll have accounted for all income so as to go on & pay the required amount - or more - to avoid interest & penalties, then an extension will provide additional time to fix it. The rest of the work may result in getting refunds, if I've not accounted for all the expenses, as well.

So ho-hum! B-o-r-i-n-g! But necessary. (shrug). The ranch business is more interesting and vital.

Then back to the fun stuff! :-)

Thanks for a delightful comment!


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MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

I am so glad you enjoy playing---that is the most important thing. I was nodding my head in empathy with your description of project planning. :-) And I love the Moonlight Sonata too!


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Thank you. I ought to get back to my habit of playing every day. There was a time when I could resume playing after being away from it with very little effects of having not, but it seems that now I am almost like a newbie if I've been out of the habit for any time at all.

I'd found if I played at least a piece or two before starting anything else in the morning, I always got in at least that much. My stuffed Bearthoven sits on the chair in front of my Yamaha Grand Piano keyboard waiting for me to come play and reminding me. But I've been remiss and he's so patient!

The first thing in the morning schedule began to keep me from eating breakfast, but when I start my first-thing morning fruit, I usually chug up my laptop to check on while eating it, and there go my intentions. I should set aside another time of day. I used to simply sit down and play for hours & forget about everything else, the way I now do at the computer. Sometimes I'd play almost all day. My hand muscles are getting out of shape! :-/

The thing about this, though, is that I'm rescuing my poetry from the obscurity of its lengthy - lifelong, actually, - handwritten silence, by transcribing & sharing it, which I suspect has more value and contains 'me' in it. I don't want to go on into whatever lies ahead without at least trying to preserve it. But no reason I can't do both!! :-) And I do love to play, especially when I feel I'm making music, not just plunking away at it. I can make music if I get and stay in practice! But I may have to tolerate some plunking to get back into that! hehe


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MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

I feel the same about replacing the piano with my laptop lately :-). I've lost a lot of skill because I no longer practice as much as I used to. Whenever I rededicate myself to practicing something, it starts to come back though.

Publishing your poetry is so important! It is a truly valuable life's work, and "you" transcribed indeed.


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Aw - thank you, Lurana! I must admit, the piano doesn't come back as readily as it did in earlier times when I'd been away from it a good while. Perhaps it's because the things that take my attention now really crowd it out more in my mind. Whatever, it is true that my poetry has a more lasting value than my music. I love that thought that it's 'me' transcribed. Indeed, it is!


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MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

Nellieanna--I just saw again last night one of my favorite music videos from the Muppet Show...it is truly beautiful and I wanted to share it with you (whenever you have a chance). It is a haunting rendition of Bread's "If" with Cleo Laine and a master puppeteer (with exquisitely-crafted doll puppets, no actual Muppets). I hope this link works: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7U4aIgRUn4


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Hello, Lurana, - Yes! The link works fine! What a delightful, restful close to my day, which was not unpleasant, but quite full.

I've loved "If" since I first heard it in the 1970s, but had no idea it was by Bread's composer, David Gates; if, indeed, I really had any idea who Bread was. I may have thought it was some heavy metal group! Now I'm finding out how many songs of those years which I liked were theirs, such as "Make It With You" and "Baby, I'm a-Want You"! I also just realized that Jack Jones, a singer I've always liked, did an album of Bread's songs titled "Bread Winners". I'd love to have a copy of that! Perhaps I'll look into iTunes for it or some of the songs on it.

About Cleo Laine, you've now introduced me to her and I'm delighted. What a voice and delivery! I did a bit of research, since I wasn't familiar with her, and learned that she has command of 4 octaves.

The Muppets production of her singing "If" is just lovely. So thank you!


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MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

I'm glad you liked it. I have always liked "If" and some of Bread's other songs too!

It's so funny, because today I was at a resale store and there was a Cleo Laine album right on top of the records. I did not know her outside of this song either, but this is why I am indebted to the Muppet Show. :-) I love YouTube because it a whole world of music that would take years to compile...I just found her version of "On A Clear Day You Can See Forever" which is in a low range but then she hits a G above high C. Her voice is just amazing!


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Hi, Lurana. Yes - when I opened her rendition of "If" I saw so many of my old favorites in the list on the side of tubes featuring her! I intend to treat myself to a long pignut of hearing them soon!

I read about her life & her family and was sad to read that she and her (talented) daughter had a distant relationship, due to Cleo's being away so much and a rather imperious and domineering person when home. Do you know her daughter's singing work?

Her name is Jacqui Dankworth and she's 49 or so & evidently well known. Her father was Sir John Dankworth, a very highly regarded jazz songwriter and musician.


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MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

I had not heard of Jacqui Dankworth so I just looked her up too----interesting and sad childhood. She also has a lovely voice. I also had not heard Sir John Dankworth's name either; what a talented family!


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Wow, Lurana - - We're just learning all sorts of things! Aren't they an amazing musical family! Their son, Alec Dankworth, also a jazz musician and composer, plays bass. John Dankwork, of course, is a saxophonist and a clarinetist. You might enjoy this u-tube of the two of them playing a Gershwin oldie, "It Ain't Necessarily So"- together (with others, of course) in the John & Alec Dankworth Generation Big Band. http://youtu.be/F_Pn4v7wyb4


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MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

Thank you, that is a great find! I love Gershwin. And weren't we recently talking about musical/artistic inclinations running in families? :-D


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Indeed we were! :-)


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phdast7 3 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Good early morning Nellieanna - My apologies for being so long absent. The first picture of flowers is simply breathtakingly beautiful. I have scrolled back up to admire it several times now.

A lovely, and so like you, Hub. I think the section that speaks to me most strongly is "Season Into Season." Every line whispers to me hauntingly. And I think the two lines that will stay with me the longest are --

Contentment is for rest,

Not residence.

I like this so very much. I hope all is well and that you are having a good week. Theresa


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Theresa! You've been missed, too, I must say! Happy to see you here! We've all other priorities and pressure, though, so we have to take off when necessary. I see some coming up for me.

The flowers on here are my pet japonica, which has just concluded its blooming for 2013. Will be Feb., 2014 before they return. It's always so cheering.

Today has me feeling 'on point' somehow, aware of things with special clarity & intensity. But how good it is that we're not required to do more than we can with any of them. It's a privilege to be aware.

As that little couplet says, we can't remain transfixed where we are, but must get up and keep on.

A favorite writer said, "What saves a man is to take a step. Then another step. It is always the same step, but you have to take it." ____Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Thank you for coming by and leaving a welcome comment!


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phdast7 3 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Oh, Antoine de Saint-Exupery! I love the quote. Ceratinly one to live by. I hadn't thought of "The Little Prince" in years and years. I loved that book dearly. Almost as much as I loved "The Velveteen Rabbit." :)

How interesting that japonica blooms in February. And what a wonderful splash of color to brighten up our often dreary Februaries.

Hope you have a lovely weekend. :) Theresa


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MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

I follow this thread and couldn't help responding here...because I just today on another hub quoted a different line from The Little Prince: "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye." I also love the Velveteen Rabbit---it is truly one of my favorite stories. I often quote the passage about "Real", that once one becomes real, all the shine wears off, etc.....and I love seeing the things I love loved by others! :-) ~Lurana


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Theresa - Yes!- I love both those books, which I came upon generally in the same time-frame, - as a grown person, though both are as apt for grownups as for children, aren't they? Have you, by chance, read any of Saint-Exupery's other books? He was, you know, a pioneer airplane pilot and actually flew missions over the Sahara. He was involved in various ways during WWII and perished in his plane in 1944. I adored his book, "Wind, Sand and Stars" though it's been ages since I read it. I just remember that it was quite beautifully written and inspiring.

I always MUST have a copy of "The Little Prince" though I've given copies away over the years and needed to replace my own! :-) In fact, I just went upstairs to get my copy and realize it is one I sent a friend in 1999, and he returned it to me with dozens of his hand-written notes of appreciation of it, & underlined passages throughout the book and even on post-it notes attached in it, about how much he loved the book! In one of the notes he asks for forgiveness for the notes and markings he placed in it but that when he read it, it was 'his' and that's how he reads! He even mentioned that on one page he shed tears. It's near the end when the snake bit the Little Prince - to send him back to his own planet. My friend's words on that page are truly heartfelt. His comments and notes truly make my copy all the more beautiful! One of them said that I couldn't possibly have known he'd like the book unless I really KNEW him. wow. Thinking back, I guess I did, though he was strictly an online friend I never met in person!

Yes - the japonica is a marvel. We don't get a lot of snow here, but it would bloom right on, snow or no! If the temperature got so frigid as to interfere with the blossoming, it would just start over and blossom again. There are no leaves on the bushes till the flowers are almost through. The leaves are out on it now and a few hard blossoms cling here and there. It prefers that early colder weather. It's just amazing, truly!

Thank you, dear friend for your comments!


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Luranal, To my knowledge, that quote isn't one from "The Little Prince". I've never seen it attributed to any of his books. When I ran across it way back in the 1960's, it was in a scientific magazine, inscribed on a wonderful casually drawn illustration of a footprint or two in the sand. It stuck in my mind - so impressive. I may even have that actual quote somewhere in my archives! I should look for it!

So many of his memorable quotes are from The Little Prince, though. So many words and illustrations are etched on my memory from it, they sort of all run together, as the entity it is. That drawing of the elephant at the beginning, the Little Prince's 'masterpiece', is one of my favorite images on Earth. It looks like a hat, because it's of the elephant inside a boa constrictor's body, being digested, so not visible from the outside!! Such imagery and meaning! I love the baobab trees . . . ah, so many thoughts and images!- His elegant flower back on his own planet. . .I could end up quoting the whole book! haha.

I know how you feel about "The Velveteen Rabbit", too. It is a dear story full of wonderful memories and imagery, though I haven't devoured it over the years to the same extent as The Little Prince. It came to me in the throes of my life literally being shaken to the core, which both gave it a place in my heart and prevented it from lodging there as quietly, becoming part of my heart itself, I suppose. But I love it.

Yes - I also love discovering things I treasure in others' treasure chests!! :) What a delight! Thank you for sharing yours!


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MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

Do you mean your quote about taking a step? I was unfamiliar with it but searched online and finally found an attribution to his 1939 "Wind, Sand, and Stars", but with no further details so I could not confirm further.

I have not read The Little Prince in many years and do not have a copy...but the quote about the heart seeing rightly is from the close of Chapter 21. I would love to read it again soon; thank you for bringing him to mind---he is a fascinating individual! :-)


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Yes, that was the one I meant. Glad to know where it was written - and "Wind, Sand and Stars" fits.

I've been wondering all day where my friend who inscribed in the book is. He asked me to send him another copy and promised to inscribe in it the same way, when I insisted I'd given that one to him to have.


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phdast7 3 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Hello ladies - Just came in from weeding and clipping and raking to find this lovely conversation on going. Both books and both authors are simply wonderful. Nellieanna, I do remember reading Wind, Sand and Stars and way back in my memory I knew he was a pilot, but I had forgotten the details. :) Funny you have given away multiple copies of The Little Prince and I have given away untold copies of The Velveteen Rabbit. This past November quite by accident I stumbled across a hard back, 9 by 12 inch, Christmas edition of the Velveteen Rabbit. It was beautiful and to die for. I scrounged around and found "six good quality used copies and bought all of them. So at Christmas I gave one to each of my three sons and their families, two to old and dear friends and one to myself. :)

"I love seeing the things I love loved by others!" Lurana, you have expressed how I feel perfectly. On occasion I have been reluctant to share a special book or poem, in fear that it will not resonate with or bless the other person as it did me.... The goal is not to be selfish, I don't think, but to cherish what is precious and rare.

I could talk literature all evening long, but I must go take a hot shower before my old joints and muscles punish me too severely. I have more weeds to address tomorrow and I cannot afford to be half-crippled. Have a wonderful evening ladies. :) Theresa


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Theresa - It's been too long since we shared a lovely conversation in a comment thread! Thank you for visiting this one!

Another favorite little book whose copies I've given away multiple times is 'The Prophet', by Kahlil Gibran. That one goes back in my history even further than these others. I was given a copy in my early teens. Speaking of resonating, it did and does!

Those gift-edition-type Velveteen Rabbit books you found to share sound simply gorgeous. The recipients must be delighted! Also, don't you think there's something really special, like a kind of mutual tie, when you give selected people something you treasure, especially after you've gone to pains to locate the number of copies needed to give those special people? I love gifts given with such keen interest and purpose. George's gifts were always like that. Hard to say which had the most pleasure from that about them, he or I!

I admit to having great partiality to books that are not only good reading but beautiful 'eye candy', as well. I finally had to stop ordering books from Folio Books. I ran out of places for them, but not before collecting quite a few, in addition to a lifetime of hoarding books! My house is a virtual library! :-) I can't remember when I wasn't in love with books and all the wonders they bring to life.

I have out on the coffee table the tattered Volume 1, 1934 "Compton's Pictured Encyclopedia", whose purpose is "To inspire ambition, to stimulate the imagination, to provide the inquiring mind with accurate information told in an interesting style, and thus lead into broader fields of knowledge ~ such is the purpose of this work." The Foreword in it is equally inspiring.

Mother got it for me, probably as an introductory offer for the complete set, but this one volume covers such a wide variety of subjects,from science to literature, math to fairy tales, flags to magic tricks, aviation as it was then, to ancient history, geography to biography - and more; with many illustrations. It was a small education in itself. I adored it and almost wore it out. I also wrote and drew in it, - made it almost a part of myself. I couldn't have been much older than 4 or 5 when I got it, about the time I started first grade.

Your sharing your special books, poems or other special interests is self-giving rather than selfish, in my opinion! Doing so is not saying they must be appreciated exactly as you do. Even if the full jist of them isn't embraced, just hearing of them is a precious opportunity to either expand someone's circle of interests or perhaps to discover a kindred spirit! It wouldn't happen otherwise, so it's worth the risk. I love the things you share and many are new to me. That's what's so great about it!

BTW - I have plenty of weeds, in case . . . no, no, just kidding. hehe. ;-)


dreamseeker2 3 years ago

Hi Nellieanna...I'm back to comment on this one. : ) I can relate to these lines of your beautiful poetry:

'Restlessness, the quest;

Another word for life restirring,

Seeking what it needs, unending,

To grow and thrive,

To be alive.'

Sometimes unsettling circumstances take me to drastic measures, where I want to run and hide, like a child back into that shell where no one or nothing can touch me. But, writing is my passion and a part of that dream I cannot find myself to yet let go. So here I am, returning to my mentor, to be a part of what I've come to know...a safe haven.


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Gwen, I so relate to what you're saying. Writing has been my 'refuge, my mentor, my confidante, my friend, my heart's haven' for many years. I guess it always was, but never so clearly as when I most needed any of those 'people' I found speaking to me out of my own words on the paper.

I didn't even consider sharing it with others, in fact. It wasn't written for publication in the least and it was over 35 years before I shared any but a few scribblings with very close friends. I'd never want to let go of it, but I have found that I can share it with others who find it speaks to them. I'm still not very into promoting it. I am still at a stage where I prefer it to be voluntarily or spontaneously discovered by kindred minds. :-)

Along the way, - I'm not sure when, - I discovered where the only real safe haven is: - within myself.

I'm reminded of a line from the movie "Six Days and Seven Nights" in which a slightly tipsy Harrison Ford tells Anne Heche, who has come with her boyfriend to the South Pacific tropical island to enjoy its romance, that: 'They come here looking for the magic, hoping to find romance, when they can’t find it anywhere else. It’s an island, babe. If you didn’t bring it here, you won’t find it here.' Then he almost falls off his barstool. haha.

It vividly struck me as an almost universal truth he'd uttered. We're all on an 'island', - or a space ship, called Earth. There's much raw material to work with, like the palm trees and sea breeze on a tropical island; but each of us must bring to it, from within ourself, whatever it can become for ourself. 'IT' is basically neutral. We are the spark and the inspiration, as far as our lives are concerned. It's rather comforting to know. We're never away from our safe haven, because it goes with us wherever we are or go. It's a real 'dream', once we identify it and where it originates!

Hugs - and thank you for coming by here, my friend - and kindred spirit. I'm truly honored!!


dreamseeker2 3 years ago

Thanks Nellieanna. I feel honored that you share with me your stories from the heart as well. I appreciate your honesty and inspiration. Of what you give back to others and the writing community. : ) Thank you for the hugs, which are most certainly returned.


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Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Hugs and more hugs, dear Gwen. I know they're returned! :-)

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