David Herbert Lawrence (Life's summary)

David Herbert Lawrence was born in Eastwood, a mining village in Nottinghamshire, in 1885. He grew up in a considerable poverty. He attended school until 1898, when he was forced to give up his education and work as a junior clerk for three months. Subsequently he became a pupil teacher; taken up a scholarship at Nottingham University College, he graduated in 1908 receiving a teaching certificate. In the same year he moved to London starting his job of teacher at Davison Road School. After the death of his mother in 1911, Lawrence became seriously ill and decided to give up teaching in order to become a full time writer. In 1912 he fell in love with Frieda von Richthofen, German wife of his professor at Nottingham, six years older than him and mother of three children, who will stay with him for the rest of his life. They eloped to Germany and got married in 1914. The years of war were spent in England; Frieda was denied a passport because of her nationality. In 1919 they left for Italy. In 1922 he began his serious travels, going to Ceylon, Australia, America, Mexico. Being in an advanced state of tuberculosis, he returned to Italy in 1925, setting finally near Florence. He moved to France in 1929 and died at Vence, near Nice, in 1930. Lawrence continued throughout his life to develop his highly personal philosophy, many aspects of which would prefigure the "counterculture of the 1960s"; in fact, he was referenced in one of the most iconic movies about those years, Easy Rider.

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Comments 2 comments

stessily 4 years ago

Lorenzo27, An interesting summary of an enigmatic writer.

Appreciatively, Stessily


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Amanda Storm 4 years ago

Excellent writer, well worth reading!

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