Escape: A True Story

The following is a true account as told to me by my father


Author's Note: To eliminate some confusion, my father is narrating this story not me

In the summer of 1945 during the end of the World War II, my father Dohn was held captive in a Japanese military camp. Japanese forces had conquered the south- central banks of the Mekong River of Laos, namely Muang Khong near the Lao-Cambodian border. It was here that his plight took place, as I recall from memory the incredible story told to me by my mother when I was a mere adolescent in the wake of my father ’ s death.

As lieutenant and battalion leader, my father struggled to survive at the hands of the Japanese troops and so maintained his morale as his men ’ s hope for survival hinged on his unrelenting will. For more than a week, he and his battalion of fourteen soldiers were undernourished and barely were given enough water to survive. Seeing first-hand the poor treatment of his soldiers by the cruel Japanese soldiers, my father vowed that he would find the means of escape and leave safely with the remaining members of his battalion and not without rightly punishing his foreign captors.

One night when at his breaking point, my father saw his opportunity and took full advantage. He reached out from his cell and grabbed the first guard on duty and broke his neck with his bare hands. He then disarmed the second guard with the help of one of his soldiers—how exactly they did so, I ’ m not certain. He was careful to not make any noise so as to not alarm the other Japanese soldiers at the camp, managing to leave his cell along with the rest of his battalion. The cell door was fastened by a heavy chain and so my father was able to take the dead guard ’ s key and escape. At this point, I am not certain whether or not my father and his platoon killed off the rest of the enemy camp, only that their entire battalion that totaled fifteen men managed to successful escape unscathed that night to Kong Island which, was nine kilometers away and then another fifteen kilometers to Taebeur, Cambodia or what is modern-day Kampuchea. He ordered his troops to rendezvous there before their plight should any of them get separated from the rest of the battalion.

Once in rural Taebeur, the sympathetic local villagers were willing and able to provide for the friendly soldiers with food, water and shelter. Unbeknownst to my father and the battalion, the war was by then coming to an end, as the Americans would drop their atomic bombs on Nagasaki and Hiroshima on August 6th and August 9th . One of the villagers had caught wind of the news as it was broadcasted over an old radio. My father ’ s battalion rejoiced in triumph with tears of joy. The Japanese had been defeated. They could all finally go home. When reaching the mainland of Laos, my father ’ s feelings turned back to the Japanese soldiers, as his feelings were bittersweet because as far as his eyes could see along the banks of the mighty Mekong River, which bought both life and death, hundreds of dead Japanese soldiers lay strewn on the ground like fallen trees. Their message was clear: Rather than face dishonorable defeat at the hands of their enemies, they took their own lives. The blood from their bodies flowed into the Mekong River where it washed away out into the ocean.

Before my father left this world, he instructed me more than anything else, to remember: “ Remember me and remember your past, ” he said to me. “ Remember all the things I’ve taught you…Remember my struggles for when I leave this world, the memory of me will all that will be left. Be forever grateful of the Americans that ended this war when they did, because there is no telling how long it would have continued and how many more lives would have been sacrificed—just look at how many of their boys died in Normandy alone...If not for the Americans, our country would still to this day be occupied by the Japanese, who bayoneted helpless babies in the cruel act of war, because for any person in this world that shares with me a common enemy, I will proudly die alongside him and call him my brother. ”

Copyright 2009

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Comments 85 comments

\Brenda Scully 7 years ago

Hey your daddy was one tough cookie...... nice hub


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you for the comment! Funny thing was that upon returning home from the war, my father was surprised to learn that I was named after his father Dohn by pure coincidence.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Oh, by the way, yes, my father is a tough cookie but the main character in the story was my grandfather who served in the Second World War. My father served in the Vietnam War.


Enelle Lamb profile image

Enelle Lamb 7 years ago from Canada's 'California'

You have quite a legacy - great story, and a great tribute to your father and grandfather - thank you for sharing it with us.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you Enelle, for reading. I wish I couldv'e known the man who I share the very same name with, as I am reminded time and again that I resemble and act just like he did when he was alive. If for some reason I cannot have children, I wish to leave this world with the legacy of my writing. I would be content enough just with that!


Mountain Blossoms profile image

Mountain Blossoms 7 years ago from SE Thailand

Hi Dohn, An amazing story, what a brilliant man!

Thank you for your comments on my first hub - this is a wonderful part of the world.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

I appreciate it. About a year ago, I completed my first novel. It's about my family's plight from Vientiane to Nong Khai Refugee Camp and onto the States. I'm currently editing it and am shopping for a literary agent. Keep your fingers crossed! Thank you for your comment.


EnrapturedFlame profile image

EnrapturedFlame 7 years ago

Hello Dohn! I'm also from Laos and my father served in the Vietnam war too.That's a great story and I can't wait to read the final version in print. I love hearing stories that preserve memories such as this. Loyal soldiers that fight for a good cause. Of course I'm referring to our American soldiers as well. They are ALL brave heros.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Wow. I'm so happy to finally meet a fellow Lao! I maybe the first and you're the second? One what date did you join Hubpages? Anyhow, great to meet you. I look forward to chatting with you. Thanks!


EnrapturedFlame profile image

EnrapturedFlame 7 years ago

Sabaidee Aiy Dohn! It's great to meet you too! I think you're right.. we may be the only two for now. I think I joined July 3rd? I'm just trying to get a hang of this whole literary hub thing, but I enjoy reading all the wonderful stories and meeting so many great people! I remember my mom and dad talking about Nong Khai too.. wouldn't it be crazy if we were there the same time?


atlovesbm profile image

atlovesbm 7 years ago from Orange County, California

Great story! I had no idea you were laotion! I am too! =)

I love your hubs!


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Sabaidee! Okay, so now that's THREE LAO HUBBERS TOTAL that I'm aware of. If there are any more out there, they sure haven't contacted me! Laos Pride, baby! Good to hear that we got a heartbeat going here! Thanks for joining up with me! I appreciate it.


Laura12 profile image

Laura12 7 years ago

Wow I am a big fan of war stories and movies. This was very captivating and well written.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thanks Laura12. My father only recently told me the story about my paternal grandfather. I'm not exactly sure why he waited so long to do so. Oh, I sent you an email about an hour ago, in case you are not aware. Thanks for joining by the way.


trish1048 profile image

trish1048 7 years ago

A wonderful story. I've long since lost my grandparents. Many times I wish I had taken time to hear their stories and to ask them what their lives were like when they were young. But alas, I was young too. It's only now that I've reached their age that I regret not doing so. Sadly, there aren't many relatives left who could even tell me anything, and the ones that are, I don't even know where they are.

Thanks for sharing and welcome to HubPages :)


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Your welcome, trish and thank you for the comment. When I was in high school, I did an internship over at a retirement home in which I got to meet the acquaintance of a 92 year old man named Ray. Ray told me about a fire in Brooklyn he survived, about how he lied about his age to join the Navy, fought German U-Boats, got medals, married and had children. I completely fascinated by his stories as I am a sucker for a good, well-told story. It's never too late to lend an ear, trish. Many people in the retirement community sadly, seldom get visitors. They'd welcome you with open arms.


trish1048 profile image

trish1048 7 years ago

Hi dohn,

I once volunteered for an animal shelter's Pet Therapy program. I would take a puppy and kitten once a month to a nursing home. I did this for about a year. How I loved engaging with the folks. They'd tell me wonderful stories of their departed pets and share their pictures with me. Many times it was sad because one time, a woman asked me could I please leave the puppy, that she'd take good care of it and nobody would know she had it. I had to explain to her that that was not possible :(

After a year, I stopped as it was emotionally draining at times, plus, I had to return to the work force. I don't regret one single moment, and if I could, I'd do it again.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Yes, there are many things that I too want to do, but can't seem to find the time or find the motivation to find the time. All of us are guilty of it, it seems, but once you start, you wonder why you waited so long to do it in the first place. If I worked in an animal shelter, I'd probably adopt every single sad face I can find, as I'm a sucker for dogs and sometimes cats. Well, if anything, at least you did something to help out in your community. Charity and good will can be delivered many ways.


kallystehouwer profile image

kallystehouwer 7 years ago

That was a sad story. Your grandfather was something. You can be proud of his spirit and the sacrifice he gave for his country.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you. I bare his name: Dohn. As it was, upon returning home from the wake of the Vietnam War, my father saw me for the very first time.

"Did you give him a name?" My father asked my mom. At this point they had four other kids, two brothers and two sisters. (Both my parents would pick names and then negotiate!)

"I named him Dohn," my mom said.

"Really? That was my father's name."

This was a pure coincidence, because my father seldom spoke of his father. He'd always point out that it pained him too much to talk about it. My mom's selection of my name was pure coincidence and of course, it stuck.


trish1048 profile image

trish1048 7 years ago

Hi Dohn,

At one point in my marriage, my late hubby and I thought about getting a farm. After much consideration, he said to me, no, I don't think it's a good idea. I asked why not. He said, because, we'd starve. You'd have a name for every animal on the farm. He was right of course :)


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

I think I would undergo the very same problem. Unless I'm a mosquito farmers or something, I couldn't bare to kill any animals I've raised(sure wouldn't help that I'm a Buddhist too). Thanks for the comment Trish.


fierycj profile image

fierycj 7 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa

Wow, this could be make a good film, dohn. One of those Oscar types. We might look into this together in the future, my man. Very intense story. Kick-ass to the max! Yeah!


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

You and me, we're going places! I haven't even posted my best work yet, to be honest with you. I'm on the fence on whether or not I should showcase what I am currently working on...I'm not sure if you know, but I have ONE COMPLETED NOVEL based on my family's plight from Laos to a Thai Refugee Camp and then onwards to the U.S. in the wake of the Vietnam War. It took me 8 years to finish it and am now currently editing the heck out of it. I think it would also make for a fascinating story because it's never been done before. Thanks as always.


fierycj profile image

fierycj 7 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa

I knew you had something up your sleeve, man. I knew it! Ha ha ha. Sounds all interesting. 8 years? You're a nut! And people called me mad for working on my novel for 2 years! Ha ha ha. Big deal! Lol.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Some of the best advice I was ever given was, "Don't listen to anyone's advice unless they're doing better than you." Well, it sounds a little harsh but it's true. Listen, the way I look at it, 8 years is gonna come regardless...Everyone wants the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow but no one wants to brave the storm! Brave that storm Fiery and don't let that fire go out!


ugina profile image

ugina 7 years ago from Bhutan

hi dohn,

what an amazing story. your father was so brave and what an adventure. you must be so proud of him.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

I definitely am. It's hard to believe that my grandfather was that brave (most my siblings are cowards, hahaha!) Just kidding. Maybe someday I'll make this into a movie.


Dheeraji profile image

Dheeraji 7 years ago from Leicestershire

Wow dohn121, your story is so amazing and wonderful description.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thanks Dheeraji. I unfortunately don't have any stories nearly as interesting as my grandfather but I am honored to be a part of his legacy. I'm also honored to bare his name.


rosariomontenegro profile image

rosariomontenegro 7 years ago from NEW YORK

Good for him. War is a terrible thing but your grandfather had the good fortune and the courage and the intelligence to save the lives of his soldiers. That's a great feat worth celebrating for generations to come in your family. Congratulations!!!


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you very much, rosario! Both he and my dad are/were some of the bravest people I've had the honor to know. Both were paratroopers and fought valiantly during their military careers. I've always despised war but loved the soldier that fights it.


mayhmong profile image

mayhmong 7 years ago from North Carolina

That was an incredible story! You must be proud to have a father as a lieutenant?!


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you May. My father comes from a strong military lineage that goes back at least three generations. However neither I nor my brothers were interested in joining the military and so the tradition ended with us. Although I don't believe in war, I do believe in fighting an enemy who is trying to kill those you love. I believe with my heart that that is the reason why my father and his father before him partook in battle. I guess we share the same sentiments.


Abrushing1968 profile image

Abrushing1968 7 years ago from USA- Florida

Dohn121: You have honored both your father and your grandfather in this writing. Your grandfathers desire to be remembered is as powerful as it is important. For it is to the doom of men that they forget.

As their heir and offspring, it was for you they sacrificed. In return, your desire to pass on the memory of their heroism to people like me honors them and inspires me.

Thank you for the doing

ABR


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you, ABR for your encouraging and endearing response. I was never given the opportunity to know the man who I share the same name with but treasure his memory very dearly. If and when I do have children, my wish for them is to not forget the sacrifices of their ancestors who made possible for them their legacy.

Again, I appreciate your words. I hope to continue on to share my thoughts and insight to the rest of the world. Thank you.

Dohn


Writer Rider 7 years ago

Very interesting story! It's sad how they committed suicide in order to prevent being killed at the hands of the Japanese. And it's sad how the Japanese shot babies. Hopefully, there won't be any war someday. It's always messy, gruesome, destructive, and sadistic things tend to take place.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Yes, I hope that there isn't any more wars either, but I don't believe the decisions is really our's to make. It's silly to think that Congress needs to declare war in order for us to go to war. Every past president since Dwight Eisenhower has been stationing troops in all corners of the globe.

As terrible as it sounds, I believe that we will wage another war very soon. Thank you for your response, Writer Rider.


Writer Rider 7 years ago

Hopefully not in Iran. You have no idea how dangerous that is.


Rebecca E. profile image

Rebecca E. 7 years ago from Canada

This is a wonderful story, and so vivid, thanks for sharing it.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

You're welcome, Rebecca. I appreciate it. Thank you for commenting.


Scott.Life 7 years ago

great work!! I realyy enjoyed your piece


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you very much for your comment, Scott. I did my best in translating my father's story. I'm happy that you enjoyed it.


AEvans profile image

AEvans 7 years ago from SomeWhere Out There

That made me cry I could hear a man's voice who was brave enough to save his men. My father told me to that the Japanese were very mean men. I am certain that it has calmed down but I would not ever care to visit Japan not anytime soon anyway. I am so glad that you are so proud of your father, he certainly is a good man. :)


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thanks, Julianna. I know exactly what you mean about the Japanese and it really drives me up the wall sometimes, as I really do love all of the things that they manufacture, love Japanese Anime, sushi, and the films of Hayao Miyazaki and Akira Kurosawa...Oh, and I drive a Honda too:(

I am very proud of both my father and my paternal grandfather. Were it not for their courage, I wouldn't be writing this right now. Thanks, J.


Tom Cornett profile image

Tom Cornett 7 years ago from Ohio

A heart wrenching story. 40 years after WW II, my mother was still plucking bomb shrapnel from my father's back and neck. He called them "war souvenirs". Every time I see a Veteran from any war, I think, "Home of the brave." Amazing human beings. Thanks for writing your story.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thanks, Tom. No one should ever have to go to war and no director should ever glorify war either. Nothing ever good comes out of war. As a kid, I once asked my father how many people he killed in the Vietnam War. He fell silent for what seemed like five minutes. When he spoke again, he told me to never ask him again that question. That was 25 years ago.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 7 years ago from Bishop, Ca

Thanks for this, dohn121, I know now why you are proud of your name.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you, lorlie6! Yes, I definitely am. I never was got the opportunity to meet my paternal grandfather. We only have one photo of him that we were able to salvage. I hope I can become half the man he was!


ralwus 7 years ago

Wow Dohn! That is some great story and so well told too. So your family motto should be the same as mine, remember this Ne Obliviscaris, Do Not Forget; Clan Campbell. Write that down my friend and hang it on a wall.


rashi 7 years ago

realy a true and nice story.... great man


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you so much, Charles. I come from a long line of heroes. I'm just happy that I was able to record this story from my father and am now able to share it. Ne Obliviscaris is an awesome motto, thank you! I appreciate it.

Thanks, rashi for your comment. My grandfather was a true hero.


Leop profile image

Leop 7 years ago

Dohn, this is a very emotional story. Also well written. Those men with your grandfather were the real heros. I am glad that you were able to write this story.Thank you again.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you for reading this, Leop. I'm happy that I was able to share this with everyone. It was difficult for me to believe something like this could happen in real life (much like a movie) but Art does imitate Life, doesn't it? Thank you for your comment.


Arthur Gulumian profile image

Arthur Gulumian 7 years ago from Pasadena, CA

I just came across this Dohn— your father seems like a very majestic and noble man. Most of us may think we would do the same as he did, but when we are on the field— watching all those deaths; only then do we realize how difficult it must be to gain courage under fire. Thank you for allowing us too to remember such an honorable and heroic man. May he forever rest in peace and live along our memories.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you, Arthur. It was actually my paternal grandfather whose namesake I proudly share that eventually lost his life during the Second World War. Although I rarely ever agree with the atrocities of war, I do believe in protecting everything that each of us hold dear. Thank you for reading this and thank you for kind words.


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 7 years ago from New York, NY

I started reading Part One of Revenge Inc. and somehow I came upon this wonderful Hub of yours. And it reminded me (especially as I read the comments) of the night my daughter was born. For it is tradition where I come from to name a child after a deceased relative, The idea being that the soul of the departed will have an affect on the baby. And so when I was pregnant I had my fathers father in mind to whom I would honor and remember. It wasnt until after she was born that night, that my mom told me . . 30 years to the date, my Grandfather died in the very same hospital where I gave birth.

And you were blessed with your Grandfathers name for so many good reasons and one I know for sure is that his spirit and memory will never be lost. And as strong as he was . .you carry the same in the here and now.

Coincidence . .call it what ever. . but if you look at that word. . .it is really a co - incident with magic and wonder behind it.

As always your stories, your words. . .always move me to a wonderful place. Thank you my friend for I really enjoyed every second of this.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you so much, Shari! You know exactly what to say! Yes, I am honored to carry his name. I just wish that I got to know him, even if it meant that I only had one day to do so. Something tells me that I'm going to name my first son (if and only if I do have one) after my father. Thanks for sharing the story of your family's customs. I didn't know about that until you pointed it out to me. I also really liked the part about "coincidence." Thanks so much for your warm and caring support. I always look forward to hearing from you, my friend!


Bbudoyono profile image

Bbudoyono 7 years ago

Hi dohn! It was thrilling and touching. Thanks.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thanks, Bbudoyono! I'm glad that you enjoyed it.


wannabwestern profile image

wannabwestern 7 years ago from The Land of Tractors

Your grandfather's story is amazing and you told it beautifully. This kind of story raises one's hope in humanity at large. When individuals can rise above the horror around them and bring others with them, that is true greatness. I can't wait to read your novel when it is published.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

I'm taking dead-aim at 2010 as the year I break out. I really believe that as long as i do my part with preparing my novel and doing everything that is expected of me in terms of editing and meeting deadlines, I will get published--it's just a matter of time.

Thank you so much, wannabwestern. As always, I appreciate your support. I'm glad that you enjoyed this story.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 7 years ago from Houston, Texas

My Dad was also a paratrooper like your Dad and Grandfather. Mine fought in the European theatre and like yours, did not want to talk much about it. Both of my brothers were in Viet Nam.

This story came from your heart as most of yours do. Well done! It would make for a good movie script.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Wow, that's awesome, Peggy. Unfortunately, my brothers and I were too chicken to join the military and become paratroopers like my dad and his dad. I really can see this story as a movie...Tim will tell!


Katharella profile image

Katharella 7 years ago from Lost in America

Hi Dohn, when I came to see your hubs after you posted to mine about my dad, I see we also have war stories of the Japanese in common. My dad was a WWII Vet. and also, witnessed the brutal deaths of women and children. He carried those atrocities with him all his life, because he couldn't save them from harm. He was an electrician and had to play dead on a pole fixing the phone lines, while the Japanese made potshots at him, hanging, believing he was already dead. That saved his life. Some of these stories I wish I just did not know, but at the same time, glad I know, because it keeps it fresh in my mind, why I hate these wars so much. Usually a child doesn't understand the magnitude of war unless they are directly involved. It's too sad to believe, but reality non the less. I really try to just focus on the fact, he made it through, and when he was home, he made our family, worked hard, and took care of us. I too am sorry of your fathers death, maybe they will know each other on the other side, where there is no war. Let's just hope. Thank you for your thoughtful post to me!


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

You're welcome, Katharella. It was my paternal grandfather that passed away during World War II...Don't worry, you're not the first (and probably not the last) to do so. That really is an incredible story! You should copy and paste in into your new hub!

Unfortunately, there in no such thing as a good war. Your father did the right thing by doing what he did. Had he not, you wouldn't be here today! Kudos to him and to my Grandfather whom I share a namesake.

Thank you for reading me!


prettydarkhorse profile image

prettydarkhorse 6 years ago from US

great DOHN, it was a touching piece and I could also feel for your father, in 1941, when the Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Japanese occupied the Philippines and many women were raped, soldiers dead, and we were a colony of America at that time, but they came back to liberate us from the Japs,

Nice piece and memory is flashing back for me, and I remember my grandfather too who have the same message with your dad,

great one, thank you, Maita


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 6 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Please keep in mind that my father narrated this story, Maita. He's telling about his father's experience in the Second World War. My father is still very much hurt by the treatment of his father during such time period and the world does remember the atrocities of such. Thank you so much for adding that part of history. I hope that this never happens again. The U.S.'s incursion into Afghanistan troubles me now. War is never the answer.

Thanks, my friend for reading this.


Heavensgates profile image

Heavensgates 6 years ago

John, your story is extremely compelling! I am glad your father had the courage to fight, instead of staying at that camp and dying. All those 15 men escaped too! What a legacy to share. I read your comment where you are shopping for a publisher for your first book, I hope you find the best! Talk about a journey and an escape, I wrote about my months as a child in Detroit and our escape from a really depressing situation in one of my hubs as well. What a brave man, your dad. Thank you for your stories, I will be reading them all periodically.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 6 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Wow, Heavensgate. Thank you. I think I confused a lot of my readers by writing this story in first-person. It was actually my paternal grandfather who fought in the Second World War. My father is narrating the story (I'm in my 30's). I thank you for reading this as it means a lot to me. I really do hope that I can find a literary agent soon. Much of my writing is already on HubPages. The novel/series that I am working on right now is Revenge, Inc. which has garnered a lot of attention thus far. I hope that you did begin to read it! Thanks so much for the encouragement and readership!


Petra Vlah profile image

Petra Vlah 6 years ago from Los Angeles

Thank you so much for writing this powerful story of survival and giving a voice to people who do not have one anymore.

Stories like that need to be told because the world needs to know.

This is the only thing that motivates me to write my true and painful stories about my own and my family’s struggle back in Romania during the communist era.

Only if we remember the world will not forget. Keep on writing Dohn and tell the story; I know you have a lot more to say. Thank you and God bless


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 6 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

You're welcome, Petra! One day, my father sat me down and told me this story. Being that I've never met either of my grandfathers due to them passing away before I was born, all I have of them is their stories. I hope to one day share as much about them as possible.

I absolutely agree with you. The worst we could do is to forget the our ancestors. Their struggles should not be in vain. Communism isn't and never will be the answer. One day it will crumble and there are signs today that it's already failing tremendously.

Thanks so much for reading me! I really do appreciate it.


Wife Who Saves 6 years ago

This was a moving story of bravery and dedication. I would like to know when your book is published.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 6 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you so much for commenting. I'm honored to just be a part of the same bloodline as my paternal grandfather. As soon as I do, I'll let you know (I promise). I'm currently editing my first novel, which is 452 pages and just might actually become two novels due to its length. As soon as I finish there's at least one literary agent that's already interested in reading it. I hope that 2010 sees me signing a book deal! Wish me luck!


apricot profile image

apricot 6 years ago from Italy

Wow, I'm glad I found this! What an amazing story! I've got a few up my sleeve that my Gramps told me - he was in, where was it? Singapore I think and working in some war office - anyway, he reckons he was one of the first people in the world to know the war was over as the message saying the Japanese had surrendered came through on his telegraph machine. Darn, I wish he'd kept it but he threw it away! Our grandfathers do have some incredible stories to tell though! I may write some down some day!


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 6 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

It sure sounds like you have some very interesting stories to tell yourself! I sure do hope that you get the opportunity to share such. It's so important that we do, otherwise the go to waste (can you tell that I like hearing about stories?). I'm so glad you found this as well and that you enjoyed hearing it!


Duchess OBlunt 6 years ago

dohn, I'm always late! But for sure better late than never! By sharing these memories you are fulfilling your grandfather's wish. I have similar stories from my own grandfather. It's amazing how many lives are affected by War


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 6 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

You are never late in commenting on any of my hubs! Hub Love's has no expiration date :) Thank you, Duchess for reading this. This particular hub is one of my most important hubs I've written so to hear feedback is an absolute blessing. The only bad stories are the one's not shared. You are right about that. Thanks so much!


stars439 profile image

stars439 6 years ago from Louisiana, The Magnolia and Pelican State.

Very honorable family you have. Thank you for the nice hub. GBY


suny51 profile image

suny51 6 years ago

People with good values are always inspirations to their children and children remember them with all the respect they deserve,Your father was a brave man.Thanks for sharing.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 6 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thank you so much for reading this. I'm very proud of the both of them.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 6 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

Thanks suny51. In some ways, I regret not joining the military, but then again, I'm grateful I didn't. My father and paternal grandfather joined for a very good cause: Defending their homes. I'm just proud that I'm a legacy. Thank you.


ltfawkes profile image

ltfawkes 5 years ago from NE Ohio

This is a very moving story and very well-written.

Besides being an important addition to our understanding of history, is reminds us that, as each generation passes, we need to record their memories so they aren't lost to our children.

L.T.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 4 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York Author

I couldn't agree with you more, LT. It is for that exact reason that my father passes on our family's rich history, our native country's language, and practice our religion. All of this is conducive to our identity. Thank you for the comment and thank you for reading this.


Ece 3 years ago

Hudson Moore sings country. His music reeseblms the best of Eli Young & Casey Donahew. He gets it, especially in terms of the current market for this type of music. Pat Green knew what was up, so does Hudson Moore.

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