Five Reasons Why Writing for HubPages is Better Than Writing for Demand Media Studio.

Hubpages text and photo capsules make writing easy.
Hubpages text and photo capsules make writing easy. | Source

My first experience with freelance internet writing was with Demand Media Studio or DMS in 2010. As an avid internet junkie, I found the EHow.com community cozy and eclectic. Always planning to write, but too busy - I one day read that EHow was going through a major overhaul. Demand Media Studio, as the new manager of EHow required writers to submit a resume and sample article. Around this same time my hours at my day job were drastically cut. I suddenly found myself with less money and more time.

With grand ideas of an internet income, I submitted my resume with my sample article to DMS and I was accepted. I wrote about a dozen articles that are featured on Livestrong.com and Ehow.com. Here are five reasons I will never write for them again.

1. Copyright

When you write for Demand Studio your article becomes theirs. Other sites such as Suite101, will post your article, then give you copyright after a one year period. Hubpages gives you your copyright right away. Several of my DMS articles were pirated and DMS did not seem to care. If your hub is stolen from HubPages, there are steps you can take since you own the copyright.


2. Idiotic Editors/Respect and Common Courtesy

I had some awesome editors on DMS and they taught me much, but the few control freaks who disrespected me were way out of line on a professional level. DMS editors have complete control over whether your article is published and they are a discordant bunch. It's a rolI of the dice which editor you get for every article. In the hierarchy at DMS, the writer is at the bottom. The site moderators are at the top and the editors are second only to them. This creates a lot of bad feeling between the different castes. At HubPages I feel I am on equal terms with all Hubbers and while the site moderators obviously have more power, there is none of the nose in the air nastiness you see on DMS forums.

3. Author Bios

Read a few of the writer bios for Livestrong and Ehow articles and you will notice a bland uniformity. There is an exact formula DMS uses and DMS editors scrutinize each and every bio. Ehow.com is no longer a fun place to surf. What was once an awesome creative community has become just another information site. Some EHow articles don't even have author info, but say "by an EHow contributor."

The creative freedom HubPages gives its writers freaked me out at first. I still find myself breaking self inflicted DMS molds. How refreshing to write whatever you want about yourself.

4. Requirements and Restrictions

Not only does DMS require new writers to submit a resume and sample article, but writers can write only in their area of expertise. I, as a yoga instructor for example would not be able to submit an article on travel or cooking. HubPages will accept any writer - resume or not. While this causes some hubs to have poor grammar, it also allows incredible creative energy and worldwide knowledge to flow through the site. I believe the foreign voices are worth the sacrifice of English grammar.

5. Dropped Like a Hot Potato

The main reason I will never write for DMS is because they kicked me off their site. I had previously been writing DMS flat rate articles. DMS posts titles, which you find through their search engine. Articles pay between $5.00 and $15.00. The titles became fewer and less interesting over time. Frustrated, I explored the create your own title section of the site, which works very similar to HubPages with both SEO and Google Adsense.

These writer created titles are posted only to EHow. About 4 months and 5 articles later I received an Email from DMS stating there was suspicious "click" activity regarding my account. The same Email stated that if the activity did not cease my DMS account would be delactivated. It is true that I sometimes visit my articles - what writer doesn't? I immediately ceased reading my articles or even checking what page they were on in search engines. Two months later I received another DMS email terminating me.

My heart was broken. I loved writing and was cut off from the only online publisher I knew. Then my cousin Gloria in Australia Emailed me her short story, which was a link to HubPages. Here I am still, happily typing away. Once again life slams one door shut only to open a bigger, better door.


What online publisher do you prefer?

  • Demand Media Studio DMS
  • Hubpages
  • Suite101
  • I have only used Hubpages
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Comments 25 comments

NatalieSack profile image

NatalieSack 4 years ago from Pittsburgh, PA

Interesting article! Voted up. Never heard of DMS before. Incidentally, I am a yoga instructor too. Om shanti!


YogaKat profile image

YogaKat 4 years ago from Oahu Hawaii Author

Om Shanti! DMS made internet headlines back in October 2011 when they Emailed their writers that they were cutting back on article writing opportunities. Another reason it's better to write on Hubpages, but I wanted to stick with top 5.


The Finance Hub profile image

The Finance Hub 4 years ago from Portland, Oregon

Writing for Hubpages is the best! Great hub, I really enjoyed it and hope you that you will enjoy my hubs as well, voted up and useful!


YogaKat profile image

YogaKat 4 years ago from Oahu Hawaii Author

Thanks Finance Hub - I am headed to your hubs right now :)


alexsaez1983 4 years ago

Be glad you got booted when you did. I've written plenty of hubs about DMS and its trainwreck. I'm still in their system, but there are no titles anyway. I now have a PT job and private clients. Way more rewarding.


YogaKat profile image

YogaKat 4 years ago from Oahu Hawaii Author

Alexsez . . . glad u saw that trainwreck coming. Glad u got your day job . . . I believe that ALL kinds of internet opportunities are here. We just have to find them or create them.


Mr Love Doctor profile image

Mr Love Doctor 4 years ago from Puerto Rico

You are right, the worst thing that happened to eHow was when Demand Studios took them over. I had published over 400 articles on eHow and was making a healthy $40 to $50 monthly from them. But it wasn't about the money, it was about the fun and community. I wrote on everything under the sun, had a lot of fun, and basically enjoyed myself there. As a professional author, I was accepted right into the Demand Studio system without having to submit a resume, and they immediately put me into the Class 10, which meant I was eligible to write the really expensive items. But I quickly became disgusted with the new system, the rote uniformity, and the snarky editors. I didn't do eHow as a job, and the new system made eHow feel like work, not fun. I e-mailed the company and told them, "You have to understand that some of us are professional authors who come here because we enjoy the community, the anonymity, and the autonomy. You have taken all the fun out of it." I got a form e-mail back. Haven't returned since. I have written for BusinessWeek, the Wall Street Journal, and lots of smaller publications. eHow was where I went to relax and have fun. Now I've switched to HubPages. Thanks for the Hub, and thanks for saying what lots of us were thinking!


YogaKat profile image

YogaKat 4 years ago from Oahu Hawaii Author

Thanks for your confirmation Mr Love Doctor. Welcome to HubPages. I think you will find our online community more like EHowʻs early days. How fortuitous to have a professional writer, such as yourself comment on my article:)


CR Rookwood profile image

CR Rookwood 4 years ago from Moonlight Maine

Great article! Your assessment of the editors at DMS is spot on and it is the main reason I stopped writing for them. Some of the editors, as you say, were awesome, but every now and then I'd get an editor who seemed to be having some sort of psychiatric episode. It was SO unpleasant. While they never kicked me off, I never write there anymore because it is such an awful experience. I worked in call centers for years, and now I can't get a good job because of where I live and my age, so the last thing I want is to recreate the oppressive micro-managing cubicle hell I endured in the workforce for so many years in my own home now. Bleeechk. Thanks for this.


That Grrl profile image

That Grrl 4 years ago from Barrie, Ontario, Canada

eHow needed an overhaul, it still does. There are a lot of very light posts there. A lot of posts where the writers know nothing about the topic they are writing about. Meanwhile Demand Studios is too far into making the posts commercial and SEO. You have to dig through ads to find the content. Neither of them impressed me enough to write there.

I've worked on sites with control freaks and moderators who love their power - I was a Dmoz editor for ten years. I've learned to be careful about the places I choose to write.

The only thing I have against HubPages really is the heavy-handed Christian (no sex, Pagans are the devil) attitude. I'm not fond of the Zzz thing, but I can understand the idea behind it.


YogaKat profile image

YogaKat 4 years ago from Oahu Hawaii Author

Thanks CR - "micro-managing cubicle hell" - love it and so true.


YogaKat profile image

YogaKat 4 years ago from Oahu Hawaii Author

That Grrl . . . I donʻt like the Zzz thing either. My short story is my first hub to get zapped. I think our poetry and fiction hubs will be short lived. I have seen a few hubs able to skirt around the no sex, no pagan thing, but maybe they have just gone undetected. Thanks for your comments.


YogaKat profile image

YogaKat 4 years ago from Oahu Hawaii Author

Thanks for visiting Bigjessy


joanwz profile image

joanwz 3 years ago from Katy, Texas

I couldn' agree with you more about Demand Studio. I wrote for eHow for awhile, but their editors got to be really weird. I wrote one article on vertical files - you know those files at the library that contain odds and ends of local information - and the editor flat out rejected it saying that those were NOT vertical files because the cabinets were horizontal. I tried appealing, but it got rejected again, and the comments sounded like the same editor. Not long after that, they made me "Reapply" by going through their mandatory testing of authors. THousands of authors had to write three stories to see if they were really good enough to write on eHow and virtually all of them were fired. I'm enjoying Hubpages way better.


nybride710 profile image

nybride710 3 years ago from Minnesota

I'm glad now that I got rejected by them when I started my freelance career in the spring of 2011.


YogaKat profile image

YogaKat 3 years ago from Oahu Hawaii Author

Thanks for reading and commenting Joanwz and nybride. Yep . . . DM sure makes a miserable time for writers.


Willsummerdreamer profile image

Willsummerdreamer 3 years ago from Marietta, Georgia.

I looked into DMS when I started into this business, but I never applied to them because they looked like crap. Good stuff man.


YogaKat profile image

YogaKat 3 years ago from Oahu Hawaii Author

Thanks for stopping by to comment Willsummer dreamer.


rumanasaiyed profile image

rumanasaiyed 3 years ago from Sharjah, UAE

Very good topic. Came to know the benefits of writing for Hub Pages.

Voted up Useful and Shared!


Carola Finch profile image

Carola Finch 3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

I enjoyed writing for eHow until they had said they had enough articles and would be offering less titles last year. They also decided that only writers with a certain score would be offered titles first. That virtually eliminated relatively new writers like me with lower scores from earlier work from getting assignments. I am thankful to them, though, because I really learned how to write properly and learned Associated Press style. Ran into a weird editor or too myself, but most were encouraging and helpful.

You should know that Suite101 is no longer an article-based site. They recently stopped publishing articles and say they are building a site based on "Personal Experience" whatever that means - and rumor has it - no pay. Many Suite101 writers were very upset by the change, even though they were assured that the articles would be kept on the site and they would be paid royalties. There are some articles there, but some writers have found their work had been unpublished. Was OK with them at first, but had a bad experience with them and would never recommend them anyway.

My experience with Hubpages since I joined in March, however, has soothed my bruised writers ego and has been positive overall. Am so happy to be here. I also write for a number of other clients and websites.


wondering 3 years ago

This is all fine and dandy, but what does HubPages pay? Probably not more than Examiner.com, and that isn't much.


Carola Finch profile image

Carola Finch 3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

Earnings depend on traffic. I find HubPages and Examiner about the same, except that HubPages has additional earnings from Amazon and Ebay. Amazon's payment threshold is so high though, it will probably take years for my first payout.


YogaKat profile image

YogaKat 3 years ago from Oahu Hawaii Author

Examiner.com? I will check them out. Earnings do depend on traffic. I make most of my HubPages earnings from a hub I wrote on pomelos. Thanks for visiting wondering and Carola Finch.


Carola Finch profile image

Carola Finch 3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

Examiner is quite different from HubPages. It is a news website that focusses on the latest news and wants short items about 150-500 words.


Kristina Pitts profile image

Kristina Pitts 2 years ago from Greenville, SC, USA

Great article.

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