Grand tale of love, death and revelation

Do we meet our destiny or does destiny meet us?

Looking in the clear waters of my peaceful lake near my house I start to think about the past...
Looking in the clear waters of my peaceful lake near my house I start to think about the past...
Some of my family members were Czech Jews and Holocaust survivors
Some of my family members were Czech Jews and Holocaust survivors
They fled the land of their birth in 1968 at the time of the uprising against Russians.
They fled the land of their birth in 1968 at the time of the uprising against Russians.
They came to Australia long before me and passed away before I had a chance to meet them.
They came to Australia long before me and passed away before I had a chance to meet them.
I knocked on the door of their childhood's house in an attempt to come to grips with their personalities, the enigma of their suffering and the poignancy of their passing.
I knocked on the door of their childhood's house in an attempt to come to grips with their personalities, the enigma of their suffering and the poignancy of their passing.
Their books and mementos left behind hold the sense of absolutely devoted love and the separateness that human identity involves.
Their books and mementos left behind hold the sense of absolutely devoted love and the separateness that human identity involves.
I traveled far to find their last house they occupied in Australia by the urgency of my quest to understand and, through understanding, re-create their lives.
I traveled far to find their last house they occupied in Australia by the urgency of my quest to understand and, through understanding, re-create their lives.
Some of my family members, some deceased and some still alive, living in Austria...
Some of my family members, some deceased and some still alive, living in Austria...
in Hungary or...
in Hungary or...
Slovakia watched Nazi crimes happen or looked away...
Slovakia watched Nazi crimes happen or looked away...
The concept of collective guilt...I looked through the same window they used to see the Jews to be rounded up and...
The concept of collective guilt...I looked through the same window they used to see the Jews to be rounded up and...
I certainly felt the sense of my grandparents' silent suffering of shame but I could not love them less because of that...
I certainly felt the sense of my grandparents' silent suffering of shame but I could not love them less because of that...
I visited the remains of the church where my Grandmother's sister was burnt alive.
I visited the remains of the church where my Grandmother's sister was burnt alive.
I walked through the forest they used to hide and nearly starved.
I walked through the forest they used to hide and nearly starved.
I climbed to the Jewish Memorial and asked myself: "Does that then make it easier to understand why they did not help?"
I climbed to the Jewish Memorial and asked myself: "Does that then make it easier to understand why they did not help?"
I found my Grandmother kneeling in a church lost in prays. I sat next to her knowing that it is not up to me to point the finger and blame...
I found my Grandmother kneeling in a church lost in prays. I sat next to her knowing that it is not up to me to point the finger and blame...
I left the city of my childhood aching with sadness and love. I have done my own excavations of historical and personal holocausts.
I left the city of my childhood aching with sadness and love. I have done my own excavations of historical and personal holocausts.
I have been away when my Grandmother died. I just got her message: " I didn't choose that life. I just wanted to survive."
I have been away when my Grandmother died. I just got her message: " I didn't choose that life. I just wanted to survive."
It meant a laying to rest of ghosts of the holocaust and an attempt to normalize my grandparents' guilt and shame of the past.
It meant a laying to rest of ghosts of the holocaust and an attempt to normalize my grandparents' guilt and shame of the past.
When I think about my deceased family, I feel the strong tug of love and death.
When I think about my deceased family, I feel the strong tug of love and death.
Meanwhile, I am on my own, left to live my comfortable life and to ponder: "What would I do in their place?"
Meanwhile, I am on my own, left to live my comfortable life and to ponder: "What would I do in their place?"
The truth is, indeed, so fragile and yet so devastatingly lethal just like life itself. But far more frightening is the notion of dying with a heart full of regret and shame.
The truth is, indeed, so fragile and yet so devastatingly lethal just like life itself. But far more frightening is the notion of dying with a heart full of regret and shame.
My family members had no choice but I have
My family members had no choice but I have
I can not change where do I come from but I can change who I become.
I can not change where do I come from but I can change who I become.
Looking in the clear waters of my peaceful lake near my house I start to think about the future...
Looking in the clear waters of my peaceful lake near my house I start to think about the future...

'The Reader' by Bernhard Schlink

THE POWER OF FORGIVENESS

I am a daughter of Germany,
blonde, blue-eyed, tall,
a perfect example of the master race.
What do I say to the survivors of the holocaust
and their children?
Can I say: “I am sorry?”
A member of the Jewish community once said:
“We can forgive the pain that has been inflicted on us,
but we have no rights to forgive the wrong done to others.”
Can I forgive my country?
Can I forgive myself?
Can the survivors of the holocaust forgive me?
The pain of the holocaust is deeper and more profound,
than any personal pain I carry.
The anguish is silent, muted, muffled.
Such is the pain of the second generation.
The heritage of being German.
The shame of being German.’

I have read in the ‘SEASONS OF LOVE
IN AUSTRALIA
AND GERMANY’
written by Adrianne Wildencamp,
A middle aged woman
living in Tasmania
she struggled all her life
with silence of her parents
about her German heritage.
Only love is stronger that pain,
and when the pain is immeasurable,
the healing love needs
to be infinitive,
and the rest is tears.’

She finished her book
and let to rest her doubts
and fears
that there is no repentance,
there is no scope for forgiveness
when circumstances arise
to show an inhuman side
of human beings
but it can happen in any race,
place or time.




The rage faded
and the questions ceased to matter.
Whatever I had done
or not done,
whatever Hanna Schmitz had done
or not to me –
it was the path my life had taken.
I’ve made peace with it.’

Bernhard Schlink has thought so long
and hard
about German guilt.
‘The Reader’ distils its questions,
its answers
and its pure pain,
connections
between German past
and its present,
between the narrator
and an older woman.
The narrator’s generation
grew up in the shadow
of their parents’ past.
The older woman,
Hanna Schmitz
had her own motivation
to become the perpetrator,
convicted and punished
while Michael was silenced
by revulsion, shame and guilt.


The first part of the book
deals with rituals
of growing up,
while reading aloud,
taking baths and making love.
Michael is fifteen
with awakening body and mind,
full of the eagerness and yearning
that life can never fulfill,
but you are not aware it,
until you grow up.
He can not take eyes off her.
her body,
the way she hold herself and moves.
Hanna Schmitz has withdrawn
into herself,
unbothered by any input from her mind,
oblivious to the outside world.
She is slow-flowing,
graceful
and seductive.
There is an invitation,
that weakens your perception
as it sharpens your imagination,
the invitation to forget
the world
in the recesses of the body.
We all have been there,
once.


In the second part of the book
Hanna Schmitz disappears
following misunderstanding.
‘We didn’t have a world
that we shared,
she gave me the space in her life,
that she wanted me to have.
I had to be content with that.’

Michael examines the nature of his first love,
his physical desire,
his denial of her
and betrayal,
her punishment
that leaving was,
his sense of guilt and loss.

So because you wanted to make room,
you said you and you
and you
have to be sent back to be killed?

Hanna didn’t understand
what the presiding judge
was getting at.
So what would you have done?”
Hanna Schmitz
did not know
what she should
or could have done
differently,
and therefore wanted to hear from the judge,
who was here to decide her guilt or innocence.
It is not the custom
at German trials for defendants
to question the judges.
But now the question had been asked
and there was no easy answer,
not even for judge.
Talking about what ‘one’
must and must not do,
what it costs,
does not do justice
to the seriousness of the question
about tragic results of fear,
about life and death.


Hanna in a cell for life
was out of Michael’s world,
but not out of his mind:
So I was still guilty.
And if I was not guilty
because one cannot be guilty
of betraying a criminal,
then I was guilty of having loved
a criminal.”

People murder out of passion,
love and hate,
for honour or revenge,
for money or power,
in wars and revolutions,
but the people,
who were murdered in the camps,
hadn’t done anything
to individuals,
who murdered them.
There was no reason for hatred
and no war.
But executioners
don’t hate the people
they execute
and they execute them
all the same.
They are a matter
of such indifference
to an executioner
that he can kill them
as easily as not,
in his day to day work.”

Michael walked around
the concentration camp grounds
until they closed
and it was time to go home.

He wanted to understand
Hanna’s crime,
but when he condemned it,
as it must be condemned,
there was no room for understanding.
UNDERSTANDING AND CONDEMNATION.
It is impossible to do both.


In the final part of the book,
Michael had an appointment with the past,
he couldn’t miss.
How could the Greeks,
who knew that one never enters
the same river twice,
believe in homecoming?”

Michael was sending tapes to prison,
reading aloud was his speaking to her.
Hanna’s plea for clemency was granted.
He sat next to her and smelled an old woman:
“I always had the feeling
that no one understand me
anyway,
when no one understands you,
then no one can call you to account.
Not even the court,
but the dead can.”
And they said goodbye
even before
they had to separate
inside.
He woke up
next morning
and knew
that
Hanna was dead.

Hanna was asking a great deal.
Her years of imprisonment
were not merely to be
the required atonement.
She wanted to give them
her own meaning,
the meaning to be recognized.
He found the relevant Jewish Organization
in Germany
and paid the money to the account,
in the name of Hanna Schmitz.



‘I am a daughter of Czechoslovakia,
blonde, blue-eyed, tall,
a perfect example of the master race.
What do I say to the members of my family,
some dead and some still alive,
all survivors from World War II,
some of German blood on the perpetrators’ side
and others of Russian and Jewish blood
victimized on other side.
All I heard was silence
from both sides.
Looking in their deeply wrinkled faces
all huddled closely together,
I haven’t seen the redemptive power
of understanding,
guilt or forgiveness
in their eyes,
just fatigue and a deep desire
to leave everything behind.
Can I say: “I am sorry?”
on their behalf.
I always had many doubts about their past,
but for me,
they have always been just my Grandfather,
my great uncle and his son,
I am not certain if my love for them
made me invariably complicit in their crimes.
I am certain that truth of what one says
lies in what one does.
In the end I am answerable what I do
and by reflecting on the horror of my own family past
I can learn to test my own limits of forgiveness
I can share my experiences in my own creative way
and make commitment to seek and recognize
the beautiful aspects of human being
to appreciate and contribute to the beautiful world we live in
as one of my everyday earthly tasks.


More by this Author


Comments 46 comments

tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa

This is a wonderful, awesome Hub! "I am certain that truth of what one says / lies in what one does." This is beautiful. The difficulty of separating the sin from the sinner - one to be condemned the other to be understood - is so deep and so much a part of our struggle to be human. I have read and admired "The Reader" but don't know the other book you quote. I think it must be great also.

Thanks for sharing this very thought-provoking Hub.

Love and peace

Tony


ralwus 6 years ago

Hmmm, this has intrigued me immensely. I must get that book and read it now. thanks for an awesome review. CC


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 6 years ago from Western Australia Author

Happy you liked it, my dear hubbers, will plan to add my 'images reflection' as well, had problem with downloading but I think it will work now:)


lmmartin profile image

lmmartin 6 years ago from Alberta and Florida

I enjoyed this book immensely and like you, thought on it a great deal. Deeds must be viewed separate from the doer at times, probably because doers grow and change and become other than they once were, but deeds do not.

I miss your photographs and lovely thoughts. Where are they? Lynda


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 6 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you my dear Lynda for a beautiful comment, I tried to include the images many times, but had a trouble with downloading...hopefully it will work this time and I am adding them in just for you:)


Jason R. Manning profile image

Jason R. Manning 6 years ago from Sacramento, California

This is a beautiful piece you have shared. In our American schools, whites are still confronted with the sins of slavery, even though the majority of living Anglo’s have no connection, family or business with those times. Life is a hard place for the living; those born of crucible are left with deeds than cannot be undone. I have no relevant answers, I am just thankful for the grace God affords those who believe in a better place for us all. Sometimes that is the only answer. Great hub. God bless.


you suggest one profile image

you suggest one 6 years ago from NOTTINGHAM ENGLAND

I too must read the book you review so well,my own theory,for what it is worth is that,within each one of us there are two people,but learning to live with them both is not so easy,as for forgiving the sins of our fathers,I am not sure any of us has the right to do that,we all have the need to do it for our own peace of mind,but the right to forgive the sins of others lies with a much higher authority.For me to forgive the sins of my father(we all commit sin)would have meant him accepting his sins.Take careBeata,


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 6 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you Jason and 'You suggest one' for your insightful comments, I am happy that this review caught your eye, your heart and your mind:) There is no wrong and no right answer and many, many interpretations....it is timeless story showing dark and ligt sides of our human nature...I had a lot of troubles to publish this review...it took me 20 minutes to write it and two weeks to publish and still did not manage to publish the picture representation due to the downloading problems...so happy that the written part is at least here:)cross fingers the images will be here too as well...but I don't know when:)


you suggest one profile image

you suggest one 6 years ago from NOTTINGHAM ENGLAND

Hi Beata,this is the second time I have visited this hub,and it becomes more poigant each time and also seems much better when accomanied with the pictures,the only thing I can add to my previous comment is that the atrocities of that period will not and should not ever be forgotten (it was not the first time this sort of thing happened and no doubt it will not be the last)mans inhumanity to his fellow man never ceases to amaze me and most of it unfortunately commited in the name of religeon of one denomination or another and this has been going on since time began,even God asked Abraham to murder his own son. But again whether we have the right to forgive these abominations,well I don't think so,that right belongs to whosoever started it in the first place,

and until he or she does something to stop it it will carry on until the Sun burns it's last candle,keep up the good work,and take care,TONY MARTIN.


Wayne Brown profile image

Wayne Brown 6 years ago from Texas

Nice review...I don't think I have seen anything that came out of the WWII era between Germany and the Jewish community that is as interesting. There are many things of which we can load ourselves with guilt even though the action does not belong to us directly...slavery will always be one of those here in the USA. In studying that situation, I must say that there must be some rational separtation between those who actually committed the crimes and the people from which the criminals descend. A good example today would be the Muslims and their involuntary ties to the 9/11 tragedy. Yes, many in America blame all of them and their faith as the supporting factor of it. The further tragedy is that Islam elects not to speak out in defense of rational thinking and espouse the peace and love so claimed by the religion. For many, this silence is confirmation of the guilt that should be shared. WB


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 6 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you Wayne for visiting me and an interesting inside and comparision with the Muslim situation today...people are always suspicious of things they don't understand and instead of learning more they tend to destroy and blame...do you think we ever learn?


Jaggedfrost profile image

Jaggedfrost 6 years ago

Your manner is yet again beautiful beyond description my dear. Well done even if my comments come a bet belated.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 6 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you Jaggedfrost for your beautiful comment, there is never late for a worthwhile comment:)


Beege215e profile image

Beege215e 5 years ago

Beata, you have certainly done a marvelous review of this book, and as I think you intended, I among others will find it and read it. Thank you for teaching me what you know so that I may learn.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 5 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you my dear fellow hubber, I love books so if my writing encourages you to read there is the best gift you could possibly give me...thank you again and keep reading:)


ladyjojo profile image

ladyjojo 5 years ago

Thanks for sharing. God bless you. Peace

I recently wrote a hub about holocaust , hitler etc. Hubpages rejected it because they did not like me being frank and factual about that wicked event that took place during WW2. I spend much time preparing it but i'll post it on my other website soon.

YES we ought to forgive but people don't forget i think is only GOD alone can forgive and forget totally. It bleeds my heart whenever i see, read or hear about holocaust it was one of the most cruel evil thing that was ever done to human beings in this generation. I cry i grieve for days. I am not a jew and don't have any jewsih family that i know of.

But Hitler and his NAZI troops and SS where very evil, CRUEL, VINDICTIVE, WICKED, MEN. I was not there never met hitler but i am so very sorry to say he's dead am glad i never met that WRETCH. I HONESTLY feel like i hate a dead man. I am not supposed too, but somethings wells up in my heart JEWS are God's chosen people.

Who or what motivated hitler? i can only say he was incarnated by satan himself. It makes me have an erry feeling of germany. I don't think the jews can ever forget that when almost there whole race was wiped off the earth. By one man greedy for power and ambition, PROUD BOASTFUL and full of hate and contempt for others.

He would get his just recompence also his fools that followed along i hope they are preparing in there waiting place.

For God don't have favorites or likes any race better than any other. He would teach hitler a lesson soon i believe him to have been a Judas came from hell and went back to hell. That's my view


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 5 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you ladyjojo for your honest and emotional response, history is full of evil people and cruelty that keep affecting many, many people...just look around you....Hitler was not the first one nor will the last one...we all are responsible for our action and only us, people living on our planet Earth can stop violence or at least try to do so...it is not up to God to save us...we have to save ourselves...that is my view:)


ladyjojo profile image

ladyjojo 5 years ago

You are welcome. I guess we have to help oursleves and then God does the rest.

Stay strong

Peace and love


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 5 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you my dear 'ladyjojo' for your kind response and accepting of my point of view...doesn't matter from which walk of life we come from if we can accept another person's view and learn from each other...I believe in humanity...stay positive...peace and love from Beata


HattieMattieMae profile image

HattieMattieMae 5 years ago from Limburg, Netherlands

In my international class fall term I understood for the first time how the german people feel about what happen with the Jews. It was a catastorophe for the human race and a great loss, but I have to understand that the genrations now were not there when this happen. I probably have some jewish back ground myself, and I just hope that some day the burden will be lifted off the german people. I have to believe that God is a forgiving God, and perhaps through time we can all learn to heal through the tragedies like this and genocides in Africa and other places all over the globe. All we can do now is try to make the world a better place to live in. Teach our children to do even better.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 5 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you my dear new friend on hub pages for your kind words, I strongly believe that if there will be more people like you, everything is possible:)


gajanis786 profile image

gajanis786 5 years ago

Excellent and meaningful review.....I must say that their is no religion of love as a true love is a true love no matter where and in which society we find it.....further, I do agree with one of the comments above that one should surely learn positive lessons from past and try to be more tolerant and accommodating than our predecessors. Thanks.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 5 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you dear 'gajanis786' for your kind words, there is never too learn a lesson from the past:)...all the best to you wherever you are...Beata


Ranzi profile image

Ranzi 5 years ago from All Over

Great Photos. It's amazing to have such knowledge of your family history.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 5 years ago from Western Australia Author

I am very luck Ranzi that my Grandmother who I grew up with told me many stories from our past that I have passed to my children and hopefully they pass it on...in my culture I believe the stories of your family and country heritage are told long before a child hear a fairy tale...of course it is changing rapidly with Disney movies and computer games...but I believe children are always interested in family stories if there is a good storyteller to tell them...I never forget the story of my Grandmother's aunty who died when the gun making factory where she was forced to work was bombed, she was just 18 years old and only thing they recognised what belonged to her among all burnt bodies scattered around was her finger with a tiny ring she got from her sweetheart, we had regularly visited her grave where her finger was buried and Grandmother kept telling me stories about her...her memory is still alive in my head and my heart:)


Website Examiner 5 years ago

I think that for people with a good understanding of the subject matter, this review makes good sense, as it adds detail and perhaps some new dimensions to what they already know. This said, I also think you could have done a better job of setting things into their proper perspective, of introducing and then explaining the sources that you quote from so extensively. Is there an overall structure, independent of the quotes? I found this a bit challenging to read.


Ranzi profile image

Ranzi 5 years ago from All Over

web Examiner, what are you? An English professor giving feedback on a report to a student on a report card?

I think beata's writting is profound, clear and honest.

Beata, that's wonderful how you grandmother has kept the history alive in your family.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 5 years ago from Western Australia Author

I have to chuckle how strongly you defend me Ranzi, but I think you are little bit too harsh on web Examiner as I would love to improve in my writings and I take his friendly advice into account....dear web Examiner I haven't really used any extra sources except the two books I mentioned above...those extra words are just 'scattered images' in my mind and I have to learn to put them together more smoothly so you can follow the thread of my thoughts with me:)...thank you so much for stopping by and giving me advice, I will be more careful with description of my thoughts...love and peace to you both my dear hubbers and thank you so much for giving me your time:)


Website Examiner 5 years ago

Ranzi, you may want to know that I came here only because Beata Stasak had asked for my feedback, critique, and suggestions. Beata, you are very welcome; let's keep it nice and private from now on. W.E.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 5 years ago from Western Australia Author

I am sorry dear Website Examiner I should mention that as well, I am very happy and looking forward to any valuable critique and feedback as only this way I can improve, thank you again and please do not get offended, you are a great help to me:)


Ranzi profile image

Ranzi 5 years ago from All Over

My bad webmaster, I thought that you were some random person trying to belittle Beata.

Beata good for you that you are taking initiative to perfect your writing skills, but I still think your writing is great.

:)


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 5 years ago from Western Australia Author

My dear Ranzi, it is so good to know that we have so 'strong defenders for what is right and just' on the hubpages, just like you, therefore I love hubpages so much. And also thank you for your support, I have decided to continue with my long life passion of writing in another language than my own only because of the great encouragement I have found here, on hubpages...THANK YOU:)


LaurenLL profile image

LaurenLL 5 years ago

Great hub. I love it.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 5 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thanks LaurenLL, nice to meeting you here and happy you liked it:)


LuxmiH profile image

LuxmiH 5 years ago from Fort Pierce, Florida

Deata, anytime a writer is able to open the reader's eyes to compassion and understanding, while dissolving walls of prejudice, that writer has contributed to the enlightenment of the world. Today with this Hub, you are that writer. Well done!


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 5 years ago from Western Australia Author

My fellow hubber and soul mate, thank you for your beautiful message here and also on your email, we are many but together we are one:)


shanaya profile image

shanaya 5 years ago from Living in my Own Dreams:)

Hey Beata! Beautifuly written HUB with perfect Pic's. This is an emotional Hub I must add. Loved everything about it. Keep up the good work:)

VOTED UP SO HIGH, BEAUTIFUL, INTERESTING.

With lots of Love & Respect

from SHANAYA:)


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 5 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you dear Shanaya for stopping by and taking your time to vote for me...all the best with your hubbing my friend and looking forward to hear from you again:)


Cyndi10 profile image

Cyndi10 4 years ago from Georgia

Hell Beata, Very insightful and thought provoking review of such a very sensitive subject. Unfortunately, man's inhumanity to man continues. We are all are culpable when we know or suspect an atrocity that may be happening to a people and we do nothing to stop it, even if we may not be directly involved in the evil actions. Thank you for your review and your thoughts as well.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

Yes, Cyndi, you are right, we can not change who we are, but maybe if we openly talk about it and admit our faults and mistakes...maybe, just maybe we will be able to change...just little bit would be enough, wouldn't you think?...thanks my dear new follower for leaving such thought provoking comment and greetings to Georgia:)


Capedium profile image

Capedium 4 years ago from Texas.

Books is not really my thing.. But I just thought I take a look.. Could you guess what I find.. An amazing piece of Hub... But could you please explain this for me ...

I am certain that truth of what one says

lies in what one does.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

Only carpenter knows really the worth of carpentry...only politician really know what politics are all about...only mother really knows what does it mean to loose a child...

you can pretend to be someone else and talk about but you can not do what they do...


Capedium profile image

Capedium 4 years ago from Texas.

Thanks.. I think I understand a little now


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

You are welcome, but just remember ...I like writing but I am not a professional writer...:)


Capedium profile image

Capedium 4 years ago from Texas.

Is like the saying goes.. Learning does not end.. Be sure to take constructive criticism.. But between me and you, I think you a great Hubber..


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

It takes a great deal of maturity, self esteem and self awareness to take constructive criticism the way it was meant as an another step in learning and hopefully I am on the right way ...and also between me and you, I think you are a great interpreter of poetry and commentator:)

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    The Reader by Bernhard Schlink

    Click to Rate This Article
    working