Great Graphic Novels for Beginners

Want to get into graphic novels?

 "Comic books are for kids. And nerds," some people think. Not so. Graphic novels are a medium, not a genre. You can find stories of adventure, suspense, mystery, drama, and romance. There are stories as intricately plotted as any novel, with well-developed characters and rich settings. Graphic novels just happen to use illustrations and visuals to help tell the story.

On many forums I see people asking what graphic novels they can start with having little or no background reading them. Of course people list the most well-known titles like Alan Moore's Watchmen and Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns. There is no denying that these are the classics of the medium, dark, gritty tales of antiheroes and corruption.

But maybe you want to start out with something different. Maybe superhero comics aren't your thing. You may not have read comics since you were a kid, or you grew tired of inconsistent continuities, confusing crossovers, or clumsy dialogue. Maybe you've never picked up a comic book in your life, and you're wondering what the fuss is all about.

 So here are some titles to check out if you are interested in graphic novels. They require no background knowledge. You can simply pick them up and jump right in.

BONE by Jeff Smith

Want to sink your teeth into an epic fantasy with heroic characters, fearsome creatures, prophesies, and battle scenes? Jeff Smith's BONE saga is a sprawling tale of the three Bone cousins (yes, they are Bone creatures) who enter a Valley brimming with menacing creatures and get swept up in a hero's journey with a mysterious girl named Thorn and her Gran'ma Ben. Think Lord of the Rings, but more kid-friendly and a lot funnier. The lovable characters and slapstick humor is balanced by the dark threat of the Lord of Locusts, who threatens to overrun the Valley and destroy it forever.

Don't be overwhelmed by the 1300-page tome. It's a heavy book (literally), but easily accessible to both children and adults. Smaller volumes (a series of ten) are available in color, but there is something remarkable about Smith's crisp, black and white ink drawings, capitalizing on the contrast of light and shadow. By the end, you'll be in love with Fone Bone, the red dragon, and the bumbling, quiche-loving rat creatures ("Stupid, stupid rat creatures!").

You be tripping!
You be tripping!

Tintin by Hergé

If you live in Europe or anywhere else in the world besides the U.S., you are probably already familiar with the globe-trotting boy reporter and his faithful dog Snowy. Tintin is not as well-known in the U.S., although you may remember the surprisingly well-done cartoon series that aired on Nickelodeon in the '90s. Now that Steven Spielberg is working on a Tintin trilogy, the series is sure to experience a boost in popularity, and rightfully so. Fans appreciate Hergé's attention to detail and ligne claire style, not to mention the hero's unfailing derring-do and trademark quiff.

Tintin has twenty-four adventures collected in single volumes and a series of anthologies. Journey with him to every continent of the world, to a mysterious meteor in the sea, and to the moon and back. He's joined by the whiskey-guzzling Captain Haddock ("Blistering Barnacles!"), the brilliant but hearing-impaired Professor Calculus, and the bumbling detectives Thompson and Thomson (identical, but no relation). They're appropriate for kids, and grown-up kids will love them too.

Runaways by Brian K. Vaughan/Adrian Alphona

Okay, so Runaways is a Marvel series, and it features cameo appearances from familiar sorts like Wolverine, Spider-Man, and Captain America. But the real stars are the title characters, a group of teens who discover that their parents are evil (literally), run away together, and must take down their parents' supervillain occult organization, The Pride. The six original members of this ragtag group also discover special gifts and powers they've inherited from their families. Their team includes an 11-year-old mutant girl with super strength, a witch, an alien who can fly and glow like the rainbow, and the daughter of time-travelers with a psychic bond with a velociraptor.

Yes, it sounds wacky, but Vaughan and Alphona quickly establish the series' unique world and mythologies. Most Marvel superheroes live on the East Coast (notably NYC), but these kids hail from Los Angeles. They take refuge at the La Brea Tar Pits, the Hollywood sign, and other notable locations. The kids eventually shed their superhero monikers (e.g. Arsenic and Old Lace, Bruiser, Sister Grimm) and act like typical teenagers who happen to fight bizarre baddies when they're not watching reruns of Friends or discovering first crushes. Vaughan captures the teen speak quite well and avoids overusing pop culture references that will date the series. If my teenage sister, who has zero interest in comics, can get hooked on this series, then anybody can. The first two volumes by the original creators are a breath of fresh air in the Marvel universe (although no superhero knowledge is necessary) and are certain to entertain teens and adults alike.

Yorick Brown
Yorick Brown

Y: The Last Man by Brian K. Vaughan/Pia Guerra

 Imagine that in one second, around the entire globe, every single male organism (anything with a Y chromosome) suddenly dies from some mysterious plague. Every male except for a young man named Yorick Brown and his pet Capuchin monkey Ampersand. You'd think that it'd be a man's ultimate fantasy, being the last man on earth surrounded by only women, but then you'd be wrong. Yorick finds himself sought after by various groups and countries who fear the eventual extinction of the human species. And all he cares about is tracking down his fiancée Beth, who was last seen wandering the Australian Outback.

Y: The Last Man is collected in ten trade volumes and is currently being rereleased in deluxe hardback editions. Yorick and his companions, secret agent badass 355 and geneticist Dr. Allison Mann, must trek across a world thrown into chaos and find a way to save the species from extinction. Yorick faces all the staples of boyhood fantasies--pirates, cowboys, soldiers, spies, and Amazon warriors--except the dangers are real and the stakes are too high for him to remain a boy forever. In that sense, Y is a coming-of-age story as well as a thrilling adventure tale. Despite the grim premise of the story, it's packed with humor and a cast of well-developed, memorable characters.

Note that this series is for mature audiences only. It contains violence, explicit language, and sex/nudity.

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Comments 16 comments

Amanda108 profile image

Amanda108 6 years ago from Michigan, United States

I’ve very recently gotten into graphic novels and I love supernatural and scifi stuff, but superheroes just aren’t my thing. Thanks for giving me some suggestions of other options!


randi02 profile image

randi02 6 years ago from Illinois

My husband is a huge comic book/ graphic novel fan and loves all of these titles. Good suggestions!


rocknrodeogirl profile image

rocknrodeogirl 6 years ago from The Columbia Gorge

Good hub, and congratulations on your hubnugget nomination. I haven't read a comic book since I've been a kid, but I like your descriptions of each title you suggested.


ripplemaker profile image

ripplemaker 6 years ago from Cebu, Philippines

Ripplemaker (disguise as a wombat) sneaks in quietly with a sign :Congratulations for being a Hubnugget Wannabe! Vote and promote your hub." :)

Ssshhh...Just follow this link: http://hubpages.com/hubnuggets10/hub/HubNuggets-Do...

By the way, she whispers, do you have copies of Bone? LOL


Sage Williams profile image

Sage Williams 6 years ago

You've done an awesome job on this hub. I have never really paid much attention to graphic novels. Your hub however, has proven to be very interesting. The ones that you have chosen to right about sound like some really great adventures. Congratulations on your nomination to HubNuggets.

Good Luck,

Sage


Bundu profile image

Bundu 6 years ago from Somewhere just outside Edinburgh that no-one has heard of... Mid Calder

I really liked this hub for the very unusual non-mainstream choices of graphic novels. Great work


shazwellyn profile image

shazwellyn 6 years ago from Great Britain

Well this is different! Well done! x


Rafini profile image

Rafini 6 years ago from Somewhere I can't get away from

Graphic novels are the only books my youngest willingly reads. Now I might join him, the Runaways series sounds interesting.


Browland profile image

Browland 6 years ago from Georgia Author

Thanks for the praise and encouragement! Hope you find something on the list that you enjoy.


obsexed profile image

obsexed 6 years ago from Sensual, USA

I've seen Tintin, but not the others. I will have to look for them, they each sound very good. Thanks for the great reviews!


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 6 years ago from United States

Congratulations to being chosen for Hubnuggets. Your hub is very interesting. I have never paid much attention to graphic novels but these sound interesting.


Jayne Lancer profile image

Jayne Lancer 6 years ago from West London, UK

It's a long time since I read anything like a comic. I think you're right; there could be some stigma attached to graphic novels. Maybe I'll find a good romance ...

Congratulations on your HubNuggets nomination!


Eric Calderwood profile image

Eric Calderwood 6 years ago from USA

Maybe I can get my older daughter to read more with graphic novels. I will have to take a look at Bone. Thanks.


Browland profile image

Browland 6 years ago from Georgia Author

Thanks again for the comments. I had fun talking about my favorite non-superhero titles.


estranged911 profile image

estranged911 6 years ago from India!

Nice hub.. I would like to recommend Jimmy Corrigan - The smartest kid on planet.


Browland profile image

Browland 6 years ago from Georgia Author

Haven't heard of that one, estranged911. I'll have to check it out. Thanks!

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