How to Write a Haiku about Nature

Modern Haiga (Haiku with Photographic Image): Visions of Autumn
Modern Haiga (Haiku with Photographic Image): Visions of Autumn | Source

Japanese Haiku

Traditional Japanese haiku* are short non-rhyming poems which generally have the same three characteristics:

  • Seventeen phrases—known as on or morae
  • A cut between two ideas, represented by a punctuation mark or a cutting word
  • A word associated with one of the seasons

Based on 17 Sound Meters, not 17 Syllables

Japanese haiku are not based upon 17 syllables, as many people believe. They are based upon 17 sound meters, known as on or morae. The on (sound meters), when counted the way syllables would be counted in English, can number anywhere from 14 to 18 or more.

__________

* Haiku is both the singular and plural form of the word. Haiku should not be spelled with an uppercase H, except when it begins a sentence.

Kiru (Cut) and Kireji (Cutting Word)

Kiru is the Japanese word for cut. It represents the idea that when composing a haiku, one's thoughts are cut into two sections. In the modern haiga (haiku with photographic image) at the top of this article, my thoughts are cut between the second and third lines of my poem.

Kireji is the punctuation mark or word that figuratively cuts the haiku into two parts. In my modern haiga above, I used the ellipsis (...) to cut my haiku into two parts. The ellipsis is my kireji.

Kigo (Seasonal Reference)

A kigo is a word used in Japanese poetry to represent one of the four seasons. The word does not have to be the name of a season. It can be any word related to a season or nature. Translated into English, the kigo may appear as a phrase.

Seasonal Words (Kigo) to Use in Autumn Haiku

a little cold, apple, autumn air, autumn color, autumn day, autumn deepens, autumn dusk, autumn is clearing, autumn is deep, autumn rain, autumn sky, autumn wind, autumnal clear day, autumn's voice, bright moon, chestnuts, chilly, chrysanthemums, coming of autumn, cricket, deer, desolate, dew, dragonfly, fleeting autumn, flower garden, fog, grapes, grasses, harvest moon, lightning, long night, mackerel clouds, migrating birds, Milky Way, moon, morning cold, mushrooms. new coolness, night chill, orchids, peach, pear, refreshing, remaining heat, soak to the bone, waiting evening, windstorm

Seasonal Words (Kigo) to Use in Winter Haiku

bed bugs , bonfire, charcoal, clear and cold, clear winter day, close of the year, cold, daikon, early plum, fallen leaves, fireplace, first snow, flowers out of season, freeze, frost, hawk, ice, icicles, Indian summer, narcissus, nearly spring, New Year's Eve, north wind, onion, oysters, porridge, quilt, sea cucumber, short day, sleet, small brazier, snow, snow pellets, snowflakes, tea flowers, the cold time, the passing year, turnip, water dried up, waterfowl, wild ducks, winter camellia, winter fly, winter grasses, winter greens, winter moon, winter mountains, winter night, winter rain, winter seclusion, winter shower, winter withering, withered field, withered mums, withering wind

Seasonal Words (Kigo) to Use in Spring Haiku

avalanche, azalea, balloon, barely spring, beach combingb, birds enter clouds, blossom cool, blossom hazebl, blossoms, bugs come out, burning the hills, bush warbler, butterfly, camellia, cats in love, cherry blossoms, cherrystone clam, cloudy spring, colt, coming of spring, dandelion, deep spring, departing ducks, departing geese, east wind, end of snow, fiddlehead, first cherry blossoms, first spring gust, frog, haze, hazy moon, heat shimmer, herb gathering, horsetail, ice floes, kite, last frost, late cherry blossoms, light snow, lingering day, long day, many baby birds, melt off, melting snow, mulberry, mustard flower, passing spring, peach blossoms, pheasant, pinwheel, planting seed, plow, plum blossoms, pony, primrose, red plum blossoms, remaining cherry blossoms, remaining snow, returning cold, serene, shallow spring, shimmering heat, shining wind, silkworms, skylark, soap bubbles, sowing seed, spring clouds, spring dawn, spring day, spring equinox, spring evening, spring field, spring grasses, spring gust, spring lantern, spring light, spring melancholy, spring mountains, spring mud, spring night, spring noontime, spring orchid, spring rain, spring sea, spring sky, spring soil, spring thunder, spring tide, spring wind, spring-like, sprouting grasses, sprouts, still cold, swallow, swing, tadpoles, tea picking, thin ice, tilling a field, tranquil, tree buds, twittering, violet, warm, waters of spring, waters warming, wild rose, willow, wisteria, young grasses, young green plants

Seasonal Words (Kigo) to Use in Summer Haiku

afterglow, ant, autumn near, bamboo shoots, barley, blighted leaves, burning, burning hot, cicada, clear spring-water, cloud peaks, cool, cooling off, cooling on the porch, cutting grasses, dripping spring-water, drought, eel, eggplant, evening downpour, evening lull, fallen evergreen leaves, fawn, firefly, fireworks, fly, fountainhead, fragrant breeze, green leaf shade, green leaves, green plum, heat at zenith, hot, leafing cherry tree, lily, lotus, mandarin orange blossoms, melon, midsummer darkness, midsummer rain, morning cloudiness, mosquito, moth, multiflora rose blossom, myriad green leaves, night autumnal, peony, phoenix tree blossoms, pinks, rainbow, rainy season, river frog, shade of a tree, shady side, short night, smoldering, smoldering hot, south wind, summer cherry blossoms, summer grasses, summer grove, summer meadow, summer moon, summer-like, sunflower, swimming, thin clothes, thunder, trees newly green, waterfall, wellspring, wild iris, young leaves, young maple leaves

English Language Haiku

Haiku written in English developed from the traditional Japanese form of haiku, but there are differences between the two forms of poetry. Poetry written in English is concerned with meter, so syllables are counted when writing a haiku. Seventeen syllables is the norm when writing haiku in English, but fewer syllables is acceptable, and is not considered to be incorrect.

There aren’t strict rules for writing English language haiku, but there are some common characteristics for this type of poetry:

  • No more than seventeen syllables—written on three lines or less
  • A cut or cutting word between two ideas
  • A word associated with a season or nature should be used, but it doesn't necessarily have to be a traditional Japanese kigo. Baseball, for example, can be used as a kigo in a summer haiku. Football can can be used as a kigo in an autumnal haiku.

    In her haiku collection The Seasons in Socks, Dana Strang, who writes as DanaTeresa, used Easter egg, grass blades, rustle, and snow as her kigo.

English Language Modern Haiga

Haiku written in English with a related background image are called haiga. Examples of my modern haiga appear below.

The first haiga consists of a photograph I took in my front garden in Southern California, a haiku I wrote after seeing the rose in the gentle rain, and the haiku layered on top of the photo using Photoshop.

The haiku is 17 syllables in three groups. Five syllables are in the first group, seven in the second, and five in the third. The third group consists of a cut (kiru) between the second and third sections, a kireji—the ellipsis, and a seasonal phrase (kigo)—summer in autumn.

The second haiga consists of a photograph I took in my back garden after a very rare Southern California hailstorm, a haiku written as my reaction to the hail, and the haiku layered on top of the photo. The seasonal phrase (kigo)—frozen rain falling—is at the beginning of the haiku. There isn't any cut (kiru).

Modern Haiga (Haiku with Photographic Image): Summer in Autumn
Modern Haiga (Haiku with Photographic Image): Summer in Autumn | Source
Modern Haiga (Haiku with Photographic Image): Southern California Hail Storm
Modern Haiga (Haiku with Photographic Image): Southern California Hail Storm | Source

If you would like to know more about haiga, Mohan Kumar, who writes as Docmo, presents a beautiful video and accompanying text, Haiga: Haiku with Imagery, which explains the haiga art form.

Have you ever written a haiku?

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Comments 98 comments

marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Dear Daisy,

Haiku is one of my favorite poetry forms. This was a fascinating and informative piece that clealy distinguishes the Japanese from the English styles. I appreciated learning the elements, with the Japanese words.

Your examples and samples are beautiful...like you, I have appreciated Dana and Docmo's work as well.

Thank you very much. Voted UP and UABI. Hugs, Maria


KrisL profile image

KrisL 4 years ago from S. Florida

Nice hub . . . I'm going to reference it in my hub "Kigo: Season Words in Haiku" that I published last month.

Voted up & useful.


Sueswan 4 years ago

Hi Daisy,

I like writing haikus. I stick to three lines and the 5, 7, 5 syllable count.

Voted up and awesome

Take care :)


Vellur profile image

Vellur 4 years ago from Dubai

I have never tried Haiku, I am going to try out. You have clearly explained what is haiku all about. I thought haiku was always written with a capital H. Thanks for sharing. Voted up. Informative and useful and shared.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

It's an honor for me that Maria Jordan (marcoujor), a talented poet, is the first person to comment in my Hub.

Thanks, Maria, for reading my article and adding your very kind words.

Dana (DanaTeresa) and Mohan (Docmo) are both good friends of mine. They both write wonderful haiku, poems which are very different from each other's, but both following the 17-syllable format.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

KrisL,

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article, comenting, and adding a link to my Hub from your kigo Hub.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Sue (Sueswan),

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it.

Seventeen syllables are easy for me, but the 5/7/5 format sometimes gives me a problem. When that happens, I write my haiku on one line.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Nithya (Vellur),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I appreciate your continued support of my work.

I'm glad that you're going to try writing a haiku. (One of the references I used specifically stated that the word should never begin with an uppercase H, and the singular and plural forms of the word are spelled the same.)


Jools99 profile image

Jools99 4 years ago from North-East UK

Daisy, very interesting, detailed hub about haiku, one of the most difficult poetic forms to master. I've written a few but they probably don't actually abide by the rules. I like to write them because they are so tricky to get right :o)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Julie (Jools99),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. The rules for modern haiku written in English are less strict. I'll bet your haiku are perfectly OK.


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa

Superb hub on screen

Fascinating haiku tips -

Time flies in summer.

(Excellent, Daisy! Very informative and useful.)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Martie,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. I appreciate your support of my work.


rcrumple profile image

rcrumple 4 years ago from Kentucky

Daisy, sorry I missed this one. Haiku is very different poetry to me. I never remember viewing it before HP's. It doesn't seem like it would be too difficult, but I'm not really tempted to try it. In fact, I've pretty much decided that poetry may not be my forte, even though I enjoyed the poetry I wrote, for the most part. Very informative hub, as always! Great Job!


rajan jolly profile image

rajan jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

Daisy, this is an awesome hub. You make a very clear distinction between the Japanese and English form of haiku as also what haigu is. Very educative and interesting. I'm glad to have read it.

Voting up, useful and awesome. Sharing this too.

BTW, your haigus are beautiful.


DDE profile image

DDE 4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

Brilliantly written, a unique way of writing sometimes confused with poetry. Voted up!!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Rich (rcrumple),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I appreciate your continued support of my work.

Poetry writing isn't for everyone. I certainly can't write the humor articles which you publish.

I learned about haiku years ago. I don't remember whether it was in high school or college. I thought of haiku as a type of puzzle then, trying to fit my words into the 5/7/5 format.

Now, I frequently think in terms of 17-syllable groups. Haiku writing is much easier for me today.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Rajan,

Thanks for reading my Hub and commenting in it. Thanks, too, for sharing my article.

I appreciate your kind words about my haiga. In the autumn haiga, I wrote the haiku first and then selected the photograph from among the ones I took in New England (Vermont and New Hampshire). With the orange rose, I took the photograph first, and then wrote the haiku.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

DDE,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article about this form of poetry and adding your comment.


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 4 years ago from United States

This is a very informative hub and helpful for us to understand the differences very clearly. I am not a poet but may try a Haiku after reading your article. Thank you for this information.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Pam (Pamela99),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. I 'm glad you found the information helpful. If you decide to write a haiku, please post it on your Facebook wall so we can read it.


shruti sheshadri profile image

shruti sheshadri 4 years ago from Bangalore, India

I was actually wondering how to go about writing a haiku , when i found your hub. It made my vision clearer. Brilliantly put, thank you!

voted up :)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

shruti,

Thanks for reading my Hub and adding your comment. I would love to read your haiku. I know they will be beautiful.


MsDora profile image

MsDora 4 years ago from The Caribbean

This is my first lesson haiku poetry. Now I can appreciate the attempts made by other hubbers. Thanks for this detailed information. Voted Up, Useful and Beautiful.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

MsDora,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. I appreciate your kind words. Are you going to try your hand at writing haiku?


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 4 years ago

I didn't know what haiku was until joining Hubpages, since then I have read so many beautiful posts. Your detailed instruction defines them for me and I have learned from your sharing. Voted up.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Dianna (teaches12345),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I appreciate your continued support of my work.

I enjoy reading Hubs in which I learn something new. I also enjoy writing articles in which I can *gently impart* knowledge.


alocsin profile image

alocsin 4 years ago from Orange County, CA

All these things about haiku that I did not know about. Your list of words is very helpful. Voting this Up and Useful.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Aurelio (alocsin),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting. I'm glad you found my inclusion of the Japanese kigo to be helpful.


DanaTeresa profile image

DanaTeresa 4 years ago from Ohio

This is fantastic. It takes all the info I found when teaching myselfhow to write Haiku and puts it together nicely. I like how you listed the seasonal words. It brings across the point nicely.... THANK YOU very much for including my sock haiku!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Dana,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. I appreciate your very kind words.

The Japanese haiku information can be confusing. I'm glad I was able to explain it in a way that non-haiku writers could understand. A few readers have expressed interest in writing haiku after reading my article, which is great!

The Seasons in Socks was the perfect haiku collection to use in order to explain the use of kigo (seasonal words). Thanks for allowing me to analyze it a bit.


mary615 profile image

mary615 4 years ago from Florida

Hi, Daisy, after reading this Hub I have renewed respect and admiration for those who write Haiku. I never realized just how much thought goes into writing these.

Thanks for all the good info.

I voted this Hub UP, etc.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mary (mary615),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your very kind words about those of us who write haiku.

I would love to see you join us. Why don't you try writing a haiku?


KrisL profile image

KrisL 4 years ago from S. Florida

Hi Daisy, I know it's a little pushy to recommend one's own hubs in comments, but I just published a hub on haiga that I think you will enjoy. Thanks again for a great hub!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

KrisL,

Thanks for visiting again and letting me know about your new article. You ought to post a link to it on Facebook and Google+. They're both great ways for letting readers know you've published something new, as is Twitter.


KrisL profile image

KrisL 4 years ago from S. Florida

Thanks, Daisy. I'm only on twitter, but I've tweeted it and gotten a few dozen readers . . . two of whom also posted on Facebook.

I'm telling you not so much to get more readers, as because I think you might really enjoy my hub & its links. Be well!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

KrisL,

Thanks for visiting again. Others will enjoy your Hub, too. You really ought to tell them about it.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 4 years ago from California

Well done!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Audrey,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and commenting.


Mike Robbers profile image

Mike Robbers 4 years ago from London

Haiku is definitely a unique way of expression and it seems uniquely Japanese to me. Thanks for the hub - voted up.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mike,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. Haiku has been *Japanese* for centuries, but many more poets have been writing English language haiku.


Vinaya Ghimire profile image

Vinaya Ghimire 4 years ago from Nepal

Daisy,

I enjoyed reading this comprehensive hub. You outsmarted me. I had spotted this exclusive title, and was thinking to work on this, but had not claimed because I had already claimed four titles. LOL


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Vinaya,

Thanks for reading my Hub, commenting in it, and posting a link to it on Google+.

I've published 17 Exclusives titles and am currently working on an 18th. We beta tested the Exclusives feature for approximately six weeks when I was in the Apprenticeship Program before it was announced to everyone who writes for HubPages.

As you know, one can only have four unpublished Exclusives titles at a time. If you see a title you like and you haven't claimed four, claim the title immediately. If you go back later to claim, it might have already been claimed by someone else.


Mhatter99 profile image

Mhatter99 4 years ago from San Francisco

Thank you for this fine explanation. One thing about a lot of non-Japanese haiku writers: They write as if their haiku was a translation.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Martin (Mhatter99),

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and commenting.

You brought up an interesting point in your comment. Perhaps many non-Japanese haiku writers are not aware that if their first language is English, they should write English-language haiku that sound like English-language haiku...and that it's perfectly OK to do so.


Alecia Murphy profile image

Alecia Murphy 4 years ago from Wilmington, North Carolina

I had such a hard time writing haikus in school. But our teacher was nowhere near as in-depth as you were about the different types and styles. Had you taught me, I may have stayed a poet a little longer. Great hub Daisy!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Alecia,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your wonderful comment. I appreciate your kind words very much.

Now that you've read my article, why don't try writing a haiku? I'll bet you could write a pop culture haiku without any difficulty at all!


K9keystrokes profile image

K9keystrokes 4 years ago from Northern, California

Daisy, this is another reason I am so happy to be one of your many faithful fans! Beautifully presented with loads of education. Good stuff, my friend!

HubHugs~


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

India (K9keystrokes),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting. I appreciate your very kind words.

I found the Hub title while searching the Exclusives for more titles to claim. HubPages said it was OK for me to use it since my article would be classified as being *educational* rather than a *poetry* Hub.

I took the fall foliage photo in the Woodstock, Vermont area several years ago. The Brandy (orange-colored) rose photo was taken a few weeks ago. The orange roses are still blooming in my front garden in South Orange County.


chef-de-jour profile image

chef-de-jour 4 years ago from Wakefield, West Yorkshire,UK

Many thanks for this hub on haiku, a poetry form that is able to nourish so many, despite the fact that it has 'rules' and ancient cultural roots. I'm always amazed at how potent some haiku can be, like small hardened jewels or concentrations of colour and energy, releasing their magic on an unsuspecting audience!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Andrew (chef-de-jour),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment...sentiment which reads like beautiful prose rather than just "just words."

I appreciate your support of my work.


remaniki profile image

remaniki 3 years ago from Chennai, India

I read this hub at a time when I really wanted to learn how to write a haiku. I loved it after reading many of them by fellow hubbers. I am really fascinated by this cute form of poetry. There is so much to learn in life and you have taught me how to write a haiku. Great Daisy and thanks for this wonderful hub. Sharing this hub everywhere. Cheers, Rema.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Rema,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub. I'm glad you're going to write some haiku. It's a wonderful form of poetry.


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 3 years ago from Orlando, FL

Fantastic haiku hub! That was nice of you to add sample nature words. Well done!!!


midget38 profile image

midget38 3 years ago from Singapore

Coming in to say this is informative and thanks for explaining the structure of haiku. It's the most difficult poetic form to master because of the need for condensation and the element of mystery! Thanks for sharing! Passing this on.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Linda (Sunshine625),

Thanks for reading, commenting in, and sharing my article. I appreciate your support of my writing.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Michelle (midget38),

Thanks for reading my article, commenting in it, and sharing it. I don't use a lot of extraneous words when I write my Hubs. Perhaps that's why I find haiku very easy to write. Sometimes I think in groups of 17 syllables, and my haiku seem to write themselves.


thoughtfulgirl2 profile image

thoughtfulgirl2 3 years ago from East Coast

Very interesting hub! I love to learn and I learned something new. I had never heard of the formal term "haiga". Your photo and haiku were lovely. I do enjoy Japanese traditions. I know a little more about the art end than the writing end. I have always admired the simplicity of form in Japanese art, gardens (especially), tea ceremony ( looks simple, but actually isn't) and their general approach to life. Thanks for posting a great hub:)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Claudia (thoughtfulgirl2),

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.

I had read and admired haiga many times, but I wasn't aware that the term haiga was used for haiku with imagery until I read my friend Mohan Kumar's (Docmo's) article "Haiga: Haiku with Imagery." The combining of words with images is a beautiful form of art.


Poetic Fool 3 years ago

Nicely done, Daisy. I like that you expounded on the fact that what westerners consider Haiku doesn't exactly conform to traditional Japanese Haiku standards. Still, they're an interesting challenge to write and considering their brevity can be incredibly profound and beautiful. Thanks for another great hub!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Rick (Poetic Fool),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I appreciate your very kind words.

I used to write 17-syllable haiku with lines which weren't always 5 / 7/ 5 syllables. After writing this article, the correct syllable count seems to occur all the time.

I like micropoetry. Saying something profound in so few syllables is a beautiful art form.


midget38 profile image

midget38 3 years ago from Singapore

Thanks for the pointers, Daisy....sharing again for all haiku writers!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Michelle (midget38),

Thanks for visiting again and for sharing my Hub on World Poetry Day (March 21). I appreciate your continued support of my writing.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

Thank you so much for this one Daisy; I have learnt so much and will be voting up,across and sharing all around .

Thank you so much and have a wonderful day.

Eddy.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Eddy,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.

Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub. I'm thrilled that my poet friends are finding the information in my article to be useful. That mean a lot to me.


Angelo52 profile image

Angelo52 3 years ago from Central Florida

One of my favorite forms for expressing a thought. You have presented good information worth the reading. Voted up and shared.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Angelo52,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.

I love the simplicity of expressing a thought in just 17 syllables. Sometimes, words just seem to float into my head in 17-syllable groups.


Lisa Luv profile image

Lisa Luv 3 years ago from Conneticut, USA

You did a great job with this! I remember watching an educational program on the subject once, but this out shines the program!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Lisa,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I appreciate your very kind words.


Rusticliving profile image

Rusticliving 3 years ago from California

What an awesome hub Daisy. I have always wanted to dip my hand in Haiku, but have not known where to start or would be a little intimidated.

You offer such a wonderful tutorial that I will attempt to write one. Thank you for sharing this valuable info. You are awesome! Voted up+Shares--Lisa♥


Docmo profile image

Docmo 3 years ago from UK

Truly awesome hub with simple and effective instructions. This is a great intro for the poetic form. Thank you do much or including a link to my hub here. Voted up/ awesome!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Lisa (Rusticliving),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. I'm glad you're going to write your first haiku. Please let me know when you've completed writing it. I would love to read it.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mohan (Docmo),

Thank you for reading my article and posting your comment. I appreciate your continuous support of my writing.

You're a gifted poet who creates beautiful haiga. How could I not include a link to "Haiga: Haiku with Imagery"? You explain the art form so well in that article.


Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

Gypsy Rose Lee 3 years ago from Riga, Latvia

Great explanation on Haikus. I understand that it can be a challenging form. Enjoyed the three Haikus. Passing this on.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Rasma (Gypsy Rose Lee),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub.

I've written a number of tanka recently. The syllable count is 5 / 7 / 5 ... 7 / 7. The poem can be written in one stanza or two. The tanka is basically a haiku with two extra lines.


Kathryn Stratford profile image

Kathryn Stratford 3 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

This is a very interesting explanation of haiku. I remember writing some of this poetry when I was in school, but I haven't since. Thank you for sharing this with us. I just saw it on Google Plus, and I'm glad I checked it out!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Kathryn,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. Now that you've read my Hub, are you going to write some haiku?

I've written an article called Poetry Forms which discusses 16 of the more than 50 types of poetry. You might like to read that if you get a chance.


Kathryn Stratford profile image

Kathryn Stratford 3 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

Daisy, absolutely! I have been meaning to brush up on poetry, and get into it again. Your hubs will no doubt help me out a lot, so I will be sure to check your other one(s) out, and bookmark them for when I try this creative undertaking. Thanks again.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Kathryn,

Thanks for visiting again. I'd love to read some of your poems. Please let me know when you've written a few.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

Reread and as good second time round.

Enjoy your day Daisy.

Eddy.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Eddy (Eiddwen),

Thanks for visiting again and rereading my article. I appreciate your very kind words.


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 3 years ago from New York

Coming so late to this party there isn't much left to say except I agree with everyone! Your explanations, your links, and your exceptionally beautiful rose all add up to make this an educational hub with lots of pizzazz!!!

Voted up, useful, awesome, and interesting.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mary (tillsontitan),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. You are always welcome at my parties, no matter what time you arrive. I appreciate your very kind words and your support of my writing.


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

Great hub Daisy, brilliant explanations, and wonderful photos too, voted up and shared! nell


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Nell,

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. Thank, too, for sharing my Hub.

I'm glad you liked the photos I used with my poetry examples. I try to use my own photos whenever I can.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

Very interesting hub Daisy. I have just become interested in haiku and this taught me a lot. I am also trying to find more about other forms of poetry. Is there one form that all stanzas have four lines and all lines contain seven syllables? I know there is one with eight syllables in every line.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

John (Jodah),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I've published three Hubs describing forms of poetry...Poetry Forms, Forms of Poetry and International Poetry.

Poetry Forms received the 2013 Hubbie Award for Most Interesting Hub.

I would have to reread all my articles to see if one of the poetry forms had four-line stanzas containing seven syllables each,


ajwrites57 profile image

ajwrites57 2 years ago from Pennsylvania

Belated congratulations on your award Daisy! Informative Hub as always!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

A.J. (ajwrites57),

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and thanks for the congratulations regarding my 2013 Hubbie Award for Most Interesting Hub for Poetry Forms.


ajwrites57 profile image

ajwrites57 2 years ago from Pennsylvania

My pleasure Daisy!


ajwrites57 profile image

ajwrites57 2 years ago from Pennsylvania

Shared! :o)


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 2 years ago

Visiting again for the refresher on writing creatively about nature.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 2 years ago from California

Feeling the pull of autumn--so came back to read this one Daisy!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Dianna (teaches12345),

Thank you for visiting again. I greatly appreciate your continued support of my writing.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Audrey,

Thanks for reading my article another time. I know what you mean about feeling the pull of autumn. I live halfway between downtown Los Angeles and downtown San Diego. Today felt more like an autumn day than a summer one.


Paula Atwell profile image

Paula Atwell 2 years ago from Cleveland, OH

This is really a fascinating article! I used to write Haiku as a teenager, but never studied it beyond the syllable requirement. I was intrigued by your information posted here. :)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Paula,

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I've been so busy with ghostwriting assignments and writing travel articles under my byline, I haven't had time for writing poetry recently.


ChitrangadaSharan profile image

ChitrangadaSharan 2 months ago from New Delhi, India

A very valuable hub about how to write a haiku! I enjoy reading haikus from fellow hubbers.

I do write poems sometimes for a change but those are free hand. Good to know the rules before attempting something like haiku.

Thanks for sharing your knowledge through this well written hub!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 months ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Chitrangada,

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I'm glad you found it helpful. I enjoy writing Hubs which I like to refer to as "gently educational."

Haiku are fun for me to write. I especially like combining my words with a photograph to create a haiga.

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