I too, am British

I too, am British.


I too I'm British


Let not my skin deceive you,

for its a plate of sunny beaches in Africa,

a whiff of dark chocolate

I too, I am British.



I am a salad bowl of mannerism

coated with British features that do not

contradict my "Britishness"

you see I am British enough

to form a new English word

"Britishness" - the act of being British.

I too, am British


For my plate is filled with raw leaves

even though I am no ruminant.

I swear I even chew the cud

for its heard to digest

the blank leaves

when you are me.

but now,

I too, am British.


I swallow Alphabets and syllables.

I call Greenwich (grinwitch) - grinnich

Southwark (southwark) - sordock and

Leicester (lake-esther) - lesta

Even my name was not spared,

I who was Oluwadamilare,

has now become Dare (der)

as swallowing letters from my name.

so if you dare accuse me of being...

I'll tell you that -

I too, am British.


"Cheers" has replaced my "thank you"

"hayya" has sent my "hello" packing

and "brilliant" has booted out my "perfect"

My friends are now

my mate, my bruvs and my blood,

Isn't that lovely?


I'm afraid

I now greet you with

"You alri bruv?"

and ask

"Where about are you?"

for I too, am British.


So even if my colour remains the same,

I too, am British.

from my twisted tongue,

to my use of words

and the content of my plate.


So when I invite you

to drink tea out of a ceramic tea cup

and eat biscuit out of a crystal plate

at my tea party,

don't you dare tell me;

"go back to where about you came from!"

For I have come a long way

to be British

I too, Am British.


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