Inspirational & Insightful Quotations #71 --- Foolishness

Quotations on Foolishness

A man seldom makes a fool of himself. As a rule he is only guilty of contributory negligence.

---Robert Quillen, The Daily Star, Long Island City, N.Y., April 8, 1922.

If you must be a fool, be a cheerful one—not a grouchy old fool.

---Carl J.G. Brown, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Jan. 19, 1920.

Only fools and mules are consistent.

---Carl J.G. Brown, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Feb. 24, 1922.

When a man makes a fool of himself he generally does the job well.

---John Dodwell, The Citizen, Berea, Ky., Nov. 7, 1901.

Wise men change their minds now and then, but fools have none to change.

---James L. Dow, Lubbock Avalanche, Lubbock, Texas, Dec. 13, 1921.

One difference between a wise man and a fool is that one thinks before he speaks, and the other after.

---John Wesley Holland, The Recorder, Catskill, N.Y., July 4, 1930.

The bigger the fool the smarter he thinks he is.

---Eugene Alexander “Gene” Howe, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Feb. 2, 1918.

You can tell a fool because he is always telling what little he knows.

---Eugene Alexander “Gene” Howe, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Jan. 23, 1919.

A fool is a man who thinks he is unobserved.

---Eugene Alexander “Gene” Howe, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Feb. 22, 1919.

There is so much foolishness in it that the Drama of Life can hardly be called Profound.

---Eugene Alexander “Gene” Howe, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Jan. 8, 1920.

It is one thing to recognize folly and another thing to recognize it in one’s self.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 4, 1928.

Nothing equals the folly of a fool old enough to have accumulated some wisdom.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 29, 1929.

The fool seeks no improvement, for the past is more than satisfactory to him.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Jan. 22, 1931.

The fool seeks no escape from sin; he wants an escape from punishment.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Jan. 22, 1931.

The fool seeks no counsel that is apt to interfere with his folly.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Jan. 22, 1931.

A fool always finds some excuse for his folly.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 14, 1936.

The minute you begin to fool yourself you make it easier for others to fool you.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Aug. 4, 1928.

There is no fool worse fooled than the man who fools himself.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 27, 1929.

There is no fool greater than the great man who grows angry over a little thing.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 27, 1929.

There is no fool more to be pitied than the fool who is possessed with power.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 27, 1929.

There is no fool so foolish that vanity does not make him more so.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 27, 1929.

There is no fool hopeless as the fool who believes he is wise.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 27, 1929.

There is no fool in greater danger than he who thinks he cannot be fooled.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 27, 1929.

There is no fool so blind as the one who will not see a fact.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 27, 1929.

To be conscious of folly is the beginning of better sense.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Jan. 17, 1930.

If you want to know what wisdom is do not seek for it among fools.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 18, 1930.

Anything worthwhile can afford to wait; folly alone is afraid of time.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 9, 1930.

It is strange how reasonable our foolishness looks to us.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 10, 1930.

To get angry when someone calls you a fool is to prove their assertion.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., June 26, 1930.

In times of crises we discover how badly we have been fooling ourselves.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Aug. 14, 1930.

You cannot prove yourself wise by calling someone else a fool.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 26, 1930.

The fool seeks no more knowledge, for the thinks he knows it all anyhow.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Jan. 22, 1931.

The fool seeks no advice, for he has advice to give away.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Jan. 22, 1931.

The fool seeks no reasons; he is satisfied with excuses.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Jan. 22, 1931.

What is more foolish than to buy things because we think other people think we ought to have them?

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 30, 1931.

What is more foolish than to spend out life for that which ruins life for other people?

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 30, 1931.

What is more foolish than to live in God’s world and never make an effort to get acquainted with Him?

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 30, 1931.

You will always find someone ready to encourage you in almost any folly.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 16, 1931.

None but a fool believes himself always right.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Aug. 26, 1931.

None but a fool refuses ever to change his mind.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Aug. 26, 1931.

None but a fool is content with ignorance.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Aug. 26, 1931.

None but a fool refuses to admit his own folly.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Aug. 26, 1931.

None but a fool is guilty of the same folly twice.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Aug. 26, 1931.

None but a fool believes himself entirely without folly.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Aug. 26, 1931.

Most men finding themselves the victims of their own folly will accept anything as an alibi.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 12, 1931.

Those who try to show the world how clever they are usually look foolish.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 19, 1932.

One is never so badly fooled as when he fools himself.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 25, 1932.

A fool always finds at least one other fool who will tell him he is a wise man.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 31, 1932.

A fool always finds a hundred excuses for failure easier than one reason for success.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 31, 1932.

A fool always finds some way to make his folly appear reasonable to himself.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 31, 1932.

A fool always finds some occasion for exhibiting his folly.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 31, 1932.

A fool always finds a way to make wise men share the blame for his folly.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 31, 1932.

Never argue with a fool, for it makes both disputants look foolish.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 9, 1932.

No man knows how foolish he is until he sees his son imitating his faults.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Jan. 28, 1933.

A man might fool himself long after his friends have ceased to be fooled.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 6, 1933.

The desire for publicity has opened the way to many a folly.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 17, 1933.

A man guilty of folly usually finds it easy to blame others for his punishment.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 4, 1934.

In other men our own cleverness so often looks like foolishness.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 8, 1934.

Next to a fool is the man who enjoyed being fooled.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., June 8, 1934.

All fools have great confidence in their own follies.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 6, 1934.

All fools have plenty of opportunity to display their foolishness.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 6, 1934.

All fools have contempt for those who know they are fools.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 6, 1934.

All fools have a constant desire for something or someone to blame.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 6, 1934.

All fools have the idea that noise will redeem folly.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 6, 1934.

It is foolish to try to forget evil so long as we love it.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 10, 1936.

It is foolish to try to correct symptoms and ignore causes.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 10, 1936.

If you have built folly into your life, do not complain if the walls crumble.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 31, 1935.

A fool may have a great audience without having a great message.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 13, 1936.

A fool may have much publicity and little else.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 13, 1936.

A fool may have good clothes, but they are still the clothes of a fool.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 13, 1936.

A fool may have plenty of money and a scarcity of judgment.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 13, 1936.

A fool always finds some other fool to applaud him.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 14, 1936.

A fool always finds the opinions of a wise man tiresome.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 14, 1936.

A fool always finds some greater fool to call him a wise man.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 14, 1936.

A fool always finds some way to pretend wisdom.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 14, 1936.

The worst sort of fool is the one who thinks all the rest of us are his equals.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 16, 1936.

He that is not aware of his folly often tries to imitate the walk of a wise man.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 9, 1936.

You will generally find one fool encouraged in his folly by several others.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Dec. 26, 1936.

No way has been found to make wise men out of fools who are infatuated with their own folly.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 12, 1937.

Beware of the man who never knows when he is fooling himself.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 16, 1937.

Most fools think they are the only wise ones on earth.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 31, 1937.

Most fools hold the wise in a certain contempt.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 31, 1937.

Most fools try to learn from listening only to their own conversation.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 31, 1937.

Most fools close their eyes and open their mouths.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 31, 1937.

Most fools refuse to believe the unpleasant because it is unpleasant.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 31, 1937.

Most fools assume that their talk is as interesting to everyone else as it is to them.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 31, 1937.

There is no benefit so useless as the applause that follows folly.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 21, 1937.

If you are merely fooling yourself, you are not fooling anyone else.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 20, 1937.

Only a fool makes the same mistake over and over again.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 15, 1937.

Only a fool tries to lay all the blame on other people.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 15, 1937.

Only a fool is blind to the results of his own folly.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 15, 1937.

Only a fool tries to run away from his own troubles.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 15, 1937.

Only a fool tries to live a life over which no one is boss.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 15, 1937.

Only a fool attempts to live a life of revolt against life.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 15, 1937.

Only a fool ever hopes to find the pleasure of folly enduring.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 15, 1937.

Nothing fools a man more easily than his own passions.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 4, 1938.

Nothing fools a man more fatally than the excuses he makes for himself.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 4, 1938.

Nothing fools a man more often than the belief that he cannot be fooled.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 4, 1938.

Nothing fools a man more shamefully than the promises that evil makes.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 4, 1938.

Nothing fools a man more persistently than some follies that are most evident.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 4, 1938.

No one is so badly fooled as the man who fools himself.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 16, 1941.

There is no vice so ugly that some fool will not embrace it.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 24, 1942.

There are no greater fools than those who do not recognize their own folly.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 26, 1942.

No man can make a fool of you except by your own consent.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Aug. 25, 1942.

A distinguished poet in one of his well-known poems used the refrain, “God be merciful to me, a fool,” implying that there is no possible reformation for a fool and that all that God can do in regard to a fool is to be merciful to him.

This is poetic license and exaggeration but at that it was evident that the poet himself thought being a fool was a hopeless proposition and that a fool never was able to rid himself of his foolishness.

It is quite difficult to say what the popular idea of a fool is. The nearest you can come to it is that a fool is regarded as one who is never right in his thinking and never reasonable in his conclusions.

The mind of a fool works off the beaten road of the average mind. The judgment of a fool is always a little less than reasonable.

The result is that a fool lives in an entirely different world from other people. It is a world made up of queer thoughts and unreasonable judgments.

Popular fancy has it that a fool does not enjoy associating with other fools. While all of them are a little off in their thinking and a little unbalanced in their judgment, even this offness and unbalance is not the same for any two fools. Each fool has his own individual way of being off in his thinking and unbalanced in his judgment.

We heard a man wonder once if a fool was not the loneliest person on earth. He said that a fool never understood anyone else; that no one ever understood a fool; and that no fool ever understood himself. That does describe an exceedingly lonely person.

Another popular idea is that every person, even the most intelligent person on earth, has his foolish moments; that no person is sensible all the time and about everything; that no person is always reasonable in his judgment.

Whether that be true or not, it is certain that every person at one time or another felt foolish and has been convinced that he did or said something foolish. …

The one sure statement you hear is that it is foolish to undertake to reason with a fool. That is given up to be the limit in impossibilities.

Our wonder has always been as to whether a fool knows he is a fool. Assuredly any person recognizes his own foolish moments; even if the recognition is belated. But does a fool, who is a fool every moment he lives, realize that he is a fool? We do not think so. We do not think any fool is sensible enough to comprehend that he is a fool.

That, perhaps, is what is meant by a fool’s paradise. A fool lives in a world that is foolish but to him it is a paradise peopled by sensible thoughts and reasonable judgments.

One other wonder we have had is whether a fool looks on a sensible person as being more foolish than he himself is. It is our opinion that a fool feels sincerely sorry for sensible people.

Maybe all ideas about fools are foolish.

Anyway, there has always been a fool or two on earth.

---Henry Arnold “H.A.” Stallings, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., Oct. 11, 1946.

The difference between the fool and the wise person is that the fool does not realize he is a fool, whereas the wise person is aware that he is a fool. The fool does not comprehend it when he has done fool things; the wise person does.

The fool sees no room for improvement in himself. The wise person sees plenty of room for improvement in himself.

To the fool, each new day is merely another day. To the wise person, each new day is another opportunity to begin life over again.

Call the fool’s attention to a fault in himself and he will want to kill you. Call the wise person’s attention to a fault himself and he will want to thank you.

The wise person works unceasingly to rid himself of fool thoughts and actions; but the fool is satisfied with himself. He and his foolishness are inseparable. As King Solomon put it, “Though thou shouldst bray a fool in a mortar among wheat with a pestle, yet will not his foolishness depart from him.”

But there is hope for the fool when he can look in his mirror and see a fool.

---Wickes Wamboldt, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., Feb. 22, 1945.

“Where ignorance is bliss,

‘Tis folly to be wise.”

Thomas Gray wrote the above lines in 1747, thus perpetuating a much-quoted phrase on a much-misunderstood assumption: That what we don’t know doesn’t hurt us.

It is not difficult to see how these two words—“ignorance” and “bliss”—came to be tied together, but it is exceedingly difficult to concede that real “bliss” is the product or the companion of “ignorance.” Dictionary definitions associate “bliss” with such phrases as “exalted happiness;” and “ignorance” with such phrases as “destitute of sense or foresight.” Actually they have little in common. Ignorance is a negative—complacency, with eyes closed; but sound happiness is a positive—an intelligent enjoyment of facts and realities with eyes open.

There comes to mind an old, old story (and we are recalling it from timeworn memory, rather than from the book)—the story of the giant who was complacently confident of his own “invincibility.” But he was challenged by a courageous contender—a contender who had the courage of youth and a sword of exceeding sharpness, which sword with one mighty stroke cut through the giant’s body, so quickly and so cleanly (so goes our memory of the story) that the giant did not feel it.

He was enjoying the bliss of ignorance, not knowing that he was cut in two, until his challenge said: “Shake yourself.” And when the giant shook himself, he fell apart. (We hope we have not outraged the legend or literature.)

When some of us shake ourselves and face facts we may not be nearly as “happy,” in a sense, as when we ignored facts—but the facts were there all the time—we were already cut in two and didn’t know it. What we didn’t know did “hurt” us—but we didn’t know that it “hurt” us. And that is not intelligent happiness. It is a dangerous and unhappy kind of happiness, so-called. If we would shake ourselves sooner and face facts earlier we might be better prepared for some of the tempered swords we have to meet in life.

A popular song of years ago carried this title or phrase (again recalled from memory and not from the book): “Don’t Wake Me Up, I Am Dreaming.” But we can’t always dream. Sooner or later we have to wake up and face realities. And we would do better to face them as they come, rather than take them ultimately in one big jolt.

And yet people do like to be fooled. “The world wants to be deceived,” says an old German proverb. And Plato wrote: “Whatever deceives seems to exercise a kind of magical enchantment.” And many men make a good living out of other men’s desires to be deceived.

The professional magician is an honest sort of deceiver. We know beforehand that his business is to fool us, and we are not pleased with his performance unless he does. But the dishonest deceiver is quite another thing—he who would deceive us without our knowing it. And self-deception is still another thing. Perhaps the worst deceivers of all are those who deliberately deceive themselves.

It isn’t easy to fool a man who doesn’t want to be fooled. And usually when we are fooled it is because we have been more eager to believe fiction than to face facts. We know what we would like to be true—and we permit ourselves to believe that it is true. And we so much like to hear the things we like to hear. Who wouldn’t rather listen to pleasant flattery than to unpleasant truth?

Some of us would rather be “happy” about our financial prospects than well informed. We would rather listen to promises of big returns than to the certainty of safe returns.

But the promise of big returns has a shocking way of slipping into the certainty of no returns—and yet we often favor those who would tell us how to make money (or lose it) quickly and hazardously, rather than those who would tell us how to keep what we have, and increase it safety and reasonably.

We may think it is fun to be fooled. We may think that what we don’t know doesn’t hurt us—but if, for example, unfriendly bacteria have been undermining our health without at first producing symptoms, we have still been “hurt.”

If termites have been boring at the beams without at first making them sag, the house has still been “hurt.” If thieves have looted our safe without immediate discovery, we have still been “hurt.” And our assuming that we have not been injured by either of them has much in common with the comfort of reclining on a delayed action bomb.

Safe and sound happiness sees through open eyes—and is not the “bliss” of ignorance.

---Richard L. Evans, Milwaukee Sentinel, Milwaukee, Wis., March 23, 1947.

No man can be made a fool of unless he possesses suitable material for the job.

---Lee R. Call, Star Valley Independent, Afton, Wyo., June 26, 1959.

Wisdom is the sad smile with which we recognize our own motives in a fool.

---John Ciardi, Houston Post, Houston, Texas, May 27, 1966.

Ridicule is the tool of fools.

—Phil Conley, The Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Miss., March 25, 1948.

You will probably be dead a long time, but that is no reason why you should make a fool of yourself while living.

---Omer L. Downey, Evening Independent, St. Petersburg, Fla., Oct. 12, 1911.

It’s easy enough to prove you aren’t a fool, without arguing about it. Other folks have sense.

---Liston Dickson Elkins, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., Oct. 6, 1936.

When a man realizes he has been a fool, he’s no fool.

---Liston Dickson Elkins, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., Dec. 8, 1937.

Making a fool of others does not necessarily proclaim you a wise man.

---B.C. Forbes, Forbes Magazine, New York, N.Y., Nov. 26, 1921.

Sometimes it takes a mother 18 to 20 years to make a man of her son, and a blunder just 8 to 10 minutes to make a fool of him.

—Purser Hewitt, The Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Miss., Jan. 12, 1971.

An empty head and a full heart make a sentimentalist; a full head and an empty heart make a skeptic; an empty head and an empty heart make a fool; and a full head and a full heart make a sage.

—Nephi Jensen, Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah, Feb. 29, 1928.

He that cheats another is a knave, but he that cheats himself is a fool.

—Karl G. Maeser, Millennial Star, Liverpool, England, July 16, 1908.

How big a fool a man is depends on how much liberty he gives his ignorance.

---Bert Moses, Lake Charles American-Press, Lake Charles, La., May 3, 1926.

Wisdom begins only when you reduce your foolishness to 49 percent of the whole.

-‑‑Bert Moses, Lake Charles American Press, Lake Charles, La., Nov. 13, 1941.

The wise man sigheth in the weight of his knowledge; but the fool singeth in his lack of

understanding.

---Grantland Rice, New York Tribune, New York, N.Y., July 20, 1916.

The best cure for fools is to put their ideas to work.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Dec. 5, 1932.

Never make friends of fools or fools of your friends.

—Vera Wise, The Daily Herald, Biloxi, Miss., Nov. 29, 1945.

Only a fool takes experience for a road instead of a guide.

---Henry F. Cope, Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Ill., Aug. 11, 1907.

The fool is known by offering his forethought after the event.

---Henry F. Cope, Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Ill., Oct. 18, 1908.

One of the best ways to make a fool of yourself is to display jealousy toward the man who has attained success.

---Liston Dickson Elkins, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., Nov. 27, 1945.

The height of foolishness is on the same level with the depths of despair.

---Nashville Tennessean, Nashville, Tenn., May 16, 1925.

The wise man grasps small opportunities and makes them big, while the fool sits in an easy chair and waits for great opportunities to come his way.

---Santa Fe New Mexican, Santa Fe, N.M., April 26, 1915.

Wise people are liable to make mistakes, but foolish people practice them.

The Gospel Observer, Ashland, Ky., Oct. 11, 1998.

Imagination is responsible for half of our troubles--and our fool actions are responsible for the other half.

---Idaho Statesman, Boise, Idaho, Dec. 25, 1918.

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