Inspirational and Insightful Quotations #22 --- Common Sense

Quotations on Common Sense

Common sense leads people to do the right thing, at the right time, and in the right way. Common sense is the manifestation of wisdom, understanding, judgment, kindness, and those fundamental virtues that make a strong individual. It is the quality that gives effectiveness to all the other virtues. One may be ever so well trained, ever so brilliant, but if he lacks common sense, he may be not only useless, but dangerous.

—Bryant S. Hinckley, Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah, Sept. 27, 1941.

Common sense is usually the gift for seeing facts as they really are. Common sense is nothing more than the habit of doing things as they ought to be done. Common sense is the gift of knowing how to use the other gifts.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., July 17, 1935.

Common sense is the ability to see things as they are, a decent respect for a fact, a willingness to admit a mistake, a readiness to act in an emergency, a profound respect for anything that is true, a withholding of judgment until all the facts are in, and an open mind and an inquiring spirit.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Dec. 17, 1941.

When we say a man has common sense we mean he is a well‑rounded individual. His judgments are sound, his ambition is within reason, his vision is not distorted, his courage is normal, his determination is sufficient and his courtesy is sure. Common sense really denotes the possession of all the other qualities and in addition means the man possesses that intangible and indefinable ability to conduct his affairs in such a way that he seldom makes mistakes. The man with common sense is always an honest man. He will be a thinker, he will be reasonable, he will be active, he will be dependable, and he will be a most likeable man. Of all the forces contributing to the development of an admirable personality probably common sense is the most efficient one.

‑‑‑David Allen, Specialty Salesman Magazine, Atlanta, Ga., December 1931.

Common sense is a hard thing to have too much of.

---Elijah Powell Brown, New York Herald, New York, N.Y., Nov. 2, 1890.

Common sense is no match for common nonsense.

---Louis C. Hinman, The Citizen, Berea, Ky., Jan. 19, 1905.

Common sense is the crystallization of common experience.

---James L. Gordon, Washington Herald, Washington, D.C., April 7, 1917.

Some people are so aristocratic that they don’t even have common sense.

---T.G. Pasco, The Citizen, Berea, Ky., April 25, 1900.

To be oneself is only common sense; to be one’s better self is uncommon sense.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 1, 1964.

Idealism hogs the spotlight, but common sense brings home the bacon.

---Robert Quillen, The Daily Star, Long Island City, N.Y., Feb. 28, 1922.

Common sense is good sense about common things.

---James Milton Racer, The Citizen, Berea, Ky., April 16, 1903.

If you have common sense you have sufficient capital. Go on!

---John Wesley Holland, Livingston Republican, Geneseo, N.Y., June 20, 1929.

All the trouble in this world is due to a lack of common sense. And this common sense is not hard to acquire. The difficulty is, people accept their own opinions instead of experience.

---E.W. “Ed” Howe, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., March 19, 1909.

“Common sense” is so rare it ought always to be printed in italics.

---Carl J.G. Brown, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Feb. 24, 1926.

Common sense must be uncommon or it would not cause so much comment.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 28, 1929.

Common sense is what we use after all the experts have failed.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 28, 1929.

Common sense does not wait for a perfect opportunity.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., April 16, 1937.

Common sense does not hesitate because of difficulties.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., April 16, 1937.

Intuition is a pretty good proposition–after it has received the endorsement of common sense.

—Clarence L. Cullen, Salt Lake Herald-Republican, Salt Lake City, Utah,

Common sense has mighty little emotion mixed with it.

‑‑‑Bert Moses, Pocatello Tribune, Pocatello, Idaho, Aug. 16, 1922.

Common sense and plain work have more to do with success than all other things put together.

‑‑‑Bert Moses, Pocatello Tribune, Pocatello, Idaho, March 23, 1923.

Some men are born with common sense, but most of us have to marry it.

---Bert Moses, Lake Charles American-Press, Lake Charles, La., June 19, 1926.

No man is down and out so long as he has a little common sense left for working capital.

---Bert Moses, Lake Charles American-Press, Lake Charles, La., Dec. 23, 1926.

No man can climb up high until he brings himself down to the level of common sense.

---Bert Moses, Lake Charles American-Press, Lake Charles, La., April 30, 1927.

Common sense contains very little noise.

—Bert Moses, Lake Charles American-Press, Lake Charles, La., Nov. 25, 1928.

Common sense is just finding out your limitations and staying inside of them.

---Bert Moses, Lake Charles American Press, Lake Charles, La., March 19, 1943.

No man can climb high until he brings himself down to the level of common sense.

---Bert Moses, Lake Charles American Press, Lake Charles, La., Aug. 30, 1943.

Many folks use their common sense like a spare tire--they never use it except in an emergency.

---Bert Moses, Lake Charles American Press, Lake Charles, La., March 14, 1946.

More of us talk of common sense than talk it.

—Jack Warwick, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh, Pa., Oct. 24, 1944.

Tell a man that he has common sense and he will begin to wonder if he isn’t a little brighter than that.

—Jack Warwick, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh, Pa., April 2, 1945.

Few men feel greatly flattered when told they have common sense. They would prefer something more fashionable.

—Jack Warwick, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh, Pa., April 11, 1945.

More of us talk of common sense than talk it.

—Jack Warwick, Toledo Blade, Toledo, Ohio, Oct. 5, 1944.

If there was a luxury tax on it, more people would want to use common sense.

‑‑‑Chinook Opinion, Chinook, Mont., July 10, 1952.

Wisdom is common sense and information mixed.

---Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Texas, March 31, 1892.

Common sense will not always tell. It frequently means silence.

‑‑‑Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Texas, Dec. 3, 1892.

Common sense is the very basis of success.

---Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Texas, March 26, 1895.

A little common sense saves a lot of hard learned lessons in the school of experience.

‑‑‑Hamilton County Herald, Chattanooga, Tenn., Feb. 13, 1959.

Perseverance is an admirable trait, but without the safety valve of common sense it becomes a menace.

‑‑‑Humboldt Star, Winnemucca, Nev., Feb. 28, 1916.

Nerve will carry through, with common sense to back it up.

‑‑‑Nevada State Herald, Wells, Nev., Jan. 7, 1898.

Genius is often forced to borrow from common sense.

-‑‑New York Times, New York, N.Y., May 7, 1905.

Many a man is considered lucky when the secret of his success is that he was born with common sense.

‑‑‑New York Times, New York, N.Y., Oct. 11, 1908.

Good luck often comes to the man born with a little common sense.

-‑‑Rogersville Review, Rogersville, Tenn., March 10, 1955.

Of the five senses, common sense and a sense of humor are the rarest.

‑‑‑Saturday Evening Post, Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 10, 1906.

Common sense is the ability to see things as they are and the will to do things as they are to be done.

—Purser Hewitt, The Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Miss., May 21, 1966.

Common sense rarely makes a loud noise.

—Jack Warwick, Toledo Blade, Toledo, Ohio, Feb. 10, 1941.

Common sense is useless when suppressed.

—Jack Warwick, Toledo Blade, Toledo, Ohio, March 27, 1943.

Common sense puts nonskid chains upon tongues to keep them from slipping.

—W.A. MacKenzie, The Leesburg Morning Commercial, Leesburg, Fla., Feb. 20, 1927.

Satisfied common sense is worth more than genius any day, and one fine thing about it is that if not inherited it can be acquired.

—Tom L. Roberts, The Gazette, Farmerville, La., April 4, 1934.

Experience is a great teacher but needs a lot of help from common sense.

—Evelyn Jeane McCarty, The Prairie, Canyon, Texas, March 7, 1944.

Common sense is the ability to take the worst and make the best of it.

—Bert Moses, Pocatello Tribune, Pocatello, Idaho, Aug. 23, 1923.

Courage is a poor asset unless a lot of common sense is combined with it.

—Bert Moses, Pocatello Tribune, Pocatello, Idaho, March 13, 1924.

No man can climb up high until he brings himself down to the level of common sense.

—Bert Moses, Lake Charles American-Press, Lake Charles, La., April 30, 1927.

How [do we] produce and improve common sense? First of all, cheer up! That you realize that you lack common sense proves that you have some. The person with none at all usually thinks he has a lot. Common sense is the kind of sense possessed by the common, or ordinary, everyday folk. The term is a tribute to democracy, and implies that the great mass of people, as a rule and in the long run, are wiser than any individual or class. It is the deep, broad intelligence of the human race. Common sense is another name for sanity. The essence of sanity is to adjust the one unusual fact to the other facts which we know. An unbalanced person, when he sees his grandmother ride into the room on a pink elephant, believes what he sees; a sane person would look around, compare his vision to the other things in his life, and decide that he was deluded. Every new bit of knowledge is modified by what we already know when we have common sense. If we have no common sense the new idea upsets us, carries us away; we lose our balance, we become morbid or fanatic. To develop common sense, therefore, we must check any overemphasis upon one idea or feeling. To look too long upon any subject accurately only by looking often away from it, coming back to it each time from a different angle. Better consider a thing ten times in ten different minutes and moods than to gaze at it for one stretch of ten minutes. So every mind needs diversity of interests, as the body diversity of foods. Concentration is a good thing and it has its gains, but there is always a danger in it, and any mind that thinks continuously on one theme may be unbalanced. The whole art of life, indeed, is the art of balance. Living is like walking a tightrope. Every second of our existence we must be adjusting ourselves. The fanatic may know what is absolutely right, the enthusiast may know what is glorious, the theorist may know what to do, if--but the man of common sense knows what to do now. Wherein we see that common sense is most uncommon.

—Frank Crane, The Chicago DaiIy News, Chicago, Ill., Feb. 24, 1917.

Mightiness is common sense endowed with patience, persistence and perseverance. These are more than genius. Genius all too often is erratic and undependable. It has capacity without guidance. It has ability without wisdom. It makes, but at times also mars. Apply with diligence and common sense the knowledge you do have as you get it. Common sense has a way of occasionally placing the laurel wreath even upon the brow of mediocrity. And it places it where it is deserved. Failures should be made stair steps leading to the top. There is no elevation to lift you there, so don't wait for it. You've got to climb. Every man is greater after his trials than before he experiences them. Attainment is always within reach of him who is worthy of it.

Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, Oct. 14, 1923.

Learning without a little common sense is a dangerous thing.

Wheeling Intelligencer, Wheeling, W. Va., Dec. 17, 1909.

Common sense is the clothing of the mind; it guards against indecent exposure of the intellect.

Pocatello Tribune, Pocatello, Idaho, Jan. 13, 1943.

Enthusiasm sets the pace, but common sense wins at the wire in a walk.

Lewiston Teller, Lewiston, Idaho, April 6, 1906.

Common sense is power, for it enables you to distinguish between what is worthwhile and not worthwhile, what is possible and not possible.

New York American, New York, N.Y., Nov. 6, 1927.

Common sense is genius in its working clothes.

Idaho Statesman, Boise, Idaho, Dec. 25, 1931.

Common honesty is the handmaiden of common sense.

GaIveston DaiIy News, Galveston, Texas, Oct. 8, 1897.

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