Inspirational and Insightful Quotations #28 --- Good Intentions

Quotations on Good Intentions

Don’t get to be known for unfulfilled good intentions. Good intentions carried out become the good deeds that make men useful, loved, and famous. Doing things, rather than just planning them, makes all the difference between success and failure.

---Orison Swett Marden, Success Magazine, New York, N.Y., January 1903.

A man never catches up with his good intentions for tomorrow.

---Orison Swett Marden, Success Magazine, New York, N.Y., February 1906.

We may get some credit for our good intentions, but good intentions count for little unless followed by prompt and earnest endeavors for fulfillment.

---Milo Atkinson, El Paso Herald, El Paso, Texas, June 12, 1920.

A great tragedy: A good intention using the wrong method.

---Carl J.G. Brown, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., March 6, 1930.

The highway that leads downhill is paved with great pretensions.

---Henry Edward Warner, Richmond Times-Dispatch, Richmond, Va., Feb. 15, 1916.

In this everyday life a promising future is neck and neck with a good intention.

---Henry Edward Warner, Richmond Times-Dispatch, Richmond, Va., Jan. 27, 1916.

Even a pavement made of good intentions is slippery.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma State Capital, Guthrie, Okla., March 19, 1908.

The trouble with a lot of men who have good intentions is the lack of executive ability.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma State Capital, Guthrie, Okla., March 19, 1909.

Lots of good intentions are only carried out after they are dead.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma State Capital, Guthrie, Okla., Sept. 19, 1908.

Many people seem to enjoy life immensely by living on expectations.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma State Capital, Guthrie, Okla., Oct. 8, 1910.

Many a man wears himself out trying to keep up with good intentions.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma State Capital, Guthrie, Okla., Jan. 31, 1911.

Most men’s intentions are all right, but the way they stick to them is not worth mentioning.

---William J. Burtscher, The Taylor-Trottwood Magazine, Nashville, Tenn., November 1910.

Good intentions are all right if they have sufficient backbone.

---Bennett Wilson “B.W.” Peck, Fulton County News, McConnelsburg, Pa., May 7, 1903.

Few of us manage to keep pace with our good intentions.

---Bennett Wilson “B.W.” Peck, Fulton County News, McConnelsburg, Pa., July 22, 1903.

Intention is a poor thing without attention.

---William Jennings Bryan, Canaseraga Times, Canaseraga, N.Y., Jan. 5, 1912.

The trouble with good intentions is that death gets in ahead of them.

---Elijah Powell Brown, Buffalo Morning News, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 27, 1905.

Good intentions do not improve with age.

---Elijah Powell Brown, Duluth Evening Herald, Duluth, Minn., Oct. 11, 1902.

Some men make their intentions of being better an excuse for not being so.

---Elijah Powell Brown, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, Calif., March 14, 1898.

A place we’ve all heard of us said to be paved with “good intentions.” And it’s roofed over with “good excuses.”

---Hazen Conklin, The Evening World, New York, N.Y., Dec. 12, 1914.

The road to success is paved with results, the road to failure with good intentions never carried out.

---Hazen Conklin, The Evening World, New York, N.Y., Jan. 22, 1915.

Good intentions are a bad substitute for performance.

---John L. Brown, Aurora Daily Star, Aurora, Ill., May 16, 1922.

It is cheaper to pave your streets with good intentions. Then you can repair them every day.

---John L. Brown, Aurora Daily Star, Aurora, Ill., Oct. 7, 1922.

Good intentions are usually too good to be true.

---James S. Hastings, Milwaukee Sentinel, Milwaukee, Wis., April 21, 1921.

Good intentions too often keep company with bad habits; that’s why they never get anywhere.

---Howard N. Hildreth Milwaukee Sentinel, Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 16, 1921.

Mental reservation often spoils good intentions.

—Jack Warwick, Toledo Blade, Toledo, Ohio, Feb. 4, 1944.

A good intention unused stays good only a short while and then ceases even to be an intention.

---Jack Williams, Sr., Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., March 6, 1940.

Good intentions are a poor substitute for dependable action.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 27, 1931.

Good intentions are futile unless backs by a resolute will.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 27, 1931.

The failures of life too often result from unsupported good intentions.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Dec. 2, 1936.

It is not the lack of good intentions, but of strong wills, that causes most men’s failures.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 19, 1927.

Good intentions are the seed of good conduct, but they need cultivation.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 27, 1931.

Good intentions are of little value until they get into action.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 27, 1931.

Good intentions are easily asserted but proved with difficulty.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 27, 1931.

Good intentions are a poor defense in the presence of a lost opportunity.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 27, 1931.

Good intentions are the beginning of wisdom but character is its end.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 27, 1931.

It is a tragic mistake to believe that good intentions are entirely sufficient.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 27, 1933.

Good intentions carry one only until courage and fortitude become necessities.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Dec. 1, 1936.

Most persons would succeed if good intentions were all that was necessary.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., April 23, 1937.

"Easy Street" is paved with the same material used in the thoroughfares of the City of Destruction, to which it leads--good intentions.

---Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, June 10, 1928.

Few things are shorter lived than good intentions.

---Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah, Nov. 7, 1913.

Good intentions will not help a man on his way if he takes the wrong road.

---Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, N.Y., Nov. 17, 1930.

Good intentions without good judgment do not accomplish much.

---Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah, May 2, 1914.

Some people carry their good intentions out and then come back without them.

---Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Texas, Nov. 16, 1894.

Easy street's sunny side isn't pave with good intentions.

---Great Falls Tribune, Great Falls, Mont., Oct. 7, 1938.

Few of us are interested in those pavements of good intentions, as we do not expect to go there, anyway.

---Idaho Statesman, Boise, Idaho, Dec. 30, 1918.

Poor reputations are due to the fact that good intentions are seldom credited.

---Idaho Statesman, Boise, Idaho, Jan. 20, 1920.

The great trouble with good intentions is that, unfortunately, they are never impervious to rust.

---Idaho Statesman, Boise, Idaho, Oct. 11, 1924.

The goodness of our intentions never excuses the badness of our actions.

---Idaho Statesman, Boise, Idaho, Oct. 31, 1924.

Many a man is content to pave his way with his good intentions.

---Madisonville Democrat, Madisonville, Tenn., Nov. 22, 1956.

Good intentions are all right if not diluted too much.

---Nashville Bannner, Nashville, Tenn., Aug. 25, 1923.

The road to the poor house also is paved with good intentions.

---Nashville Bannner, Nashville, Tenn., Sept. 18, 1924.

Easy Street, too, is paved with intentions, but there is reason to doubt how good they are.

---Nashville Bannner, Nashville, Tenn., July 7, 1924.

A man is apt to slip up, even on a pavement of good intentions.

---New York Times, New York, N.Y., July 22, 1906.

Good intentions are the paving stones on which many a man slips up.

---New York Times, New York, N.Y., Dec. 24, 1911.

Lots of our good intentions die from lack of nourishment.

---New York Times, New York, N.Y., Oct. 17, 1909.

The road to success is paved with something more substantial than good intentions.

---New York Times, New York, N.Y., July 5, 1908.

The great problem of life is how to catch up with good intentions.

---New York Times, New York, N.Y., Nov. 13, 1910.

The peculiarity of the pavement which is made of good intentions is that the traveling becomes faster as the material wears out.

---Puck, New York, N.Y., Feb. 24, 1897.

It turning over new leaves a good many people do not get much beyond the prefaces of their good intentions.

---Saturday Evening Post, Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 4, 1902.

Good intentions are creditable, but they are not credit; they must be indorsed by action before they can be cashed.

---Saturday Evening Post, Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 23, 1909.

Bad habit is an unrelenting enemy of good intentions.

---Toledo Blade, Toledo, Ohio, June 27, 1912.

Sparta was a city in ancient Greece. The citizens were a stoical military people who believed in decisive action and few words. At one time when a feud was brewing between Athenians and the Spartans, the Athenians sent a messenger to Sparta with this message: "If we come to your city, we will raze it to the ground." The Spartans returned an answer composed of a single word, "IF." Good intentions are of little value if there is continual delay in putting them in practice. Some people muddle through a whole lifetime toying with the idea of doing something worthwhile--something that will justify their existence and make the world a bit the better for their being in it. To be a true success in this life as well as in the life to come you must make up your own mind very positively that there is good to be done and evil to be avoided. Do not allow any "if," "but," or "whereas" to sidetrack or delay you.

—James G. Keller, Houston Post, Houston, Texas, Feb. 11, 1954.

Blessed be the man who does one worthwhile deed today, instead of intending to do a thousand deeds at some time that is always just out of reach. Blessed be the man who keeps his work behind him, the man who does, who acts, creates, produces–the man who can look back at the close of each day and say: “This much have I accomplished.” That which we intend to do has no value unless it is done; and cursed will be the man who everlastingly intends to perform deeds of valor that never are performed. Plans are necessary; dreams have their place; thoughts must precede actions; resolves are commendable; good intentions should be encouraged; but all these, like the blueprints of the architect, are without value, unless it be that they lead to acts, deeds–realities! Beware of good intentions unfulfilled–they are the worthless blueprints of thought.

—Richard L. Evans, Millennial Star, Liverpool, England, March 1, 1928.

If we wait for the perfect moment to exercise our good intentions, we will live our lives in dreamy expectations while dozing through the realities of today!

—Ted L. Hanks, Spanish Fork Press, Spanish Fork, Utah, May 22, 1980.

Many a fellow literally knocks himself out by trying to keep up with his good intentions.

—Lee R. Call, Star Valley Independent, Afton, Wyo., Aug. 15, 1968.

Good intentions are fine, especially if they keep a man out of contentions.

—Edwin E. Naugle, St. Petersburg Times, St. Petersburg, Fla., April 26, 1922.

The smallest good deed is better than the grandest good intention.

—Hamilton G. Park, Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, Aug. 6, 1948.

Good intentions should be marked "perishable."

Good intentions may excuse us, but they do not suffice.

Good intentions are only the beginning; to them must be added judgment and will.

Good intentions make good arguments but poor proofs.

Good intentions are apt to follow the line of least resistance.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Dec. 9, 1936.

Good intentions are like a wheelbarrow--because if you get anywhere with them you have to do the pushing yourself.

—Ernest C. Wareing, Western Christian Advocate, Cincinnati, Ohio, Feb. 3, 1927.

Good intentions are best served while warm. Permitted long to remain in a state of inactivity, they lose their flavor.

—Jack Warwick, Toledo Blade, Toledo, Ohio, March 29, 1945.

The path to heaven is paved with good intentions crystallized into worthy acts.

—Henry F. Cope, Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Ill., Sept. 30, 1906.

If it is true, as they tell us, that the road to hell is paved with good intentions, it is the only road that we know of that is paved with anything all the way.

—Chinook Opinion, Chinook, Mont., July 31, 1947.

The road to ruin is paved with intentions to reform.

Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, Dec. 16, 1905.

Good intentions usually decay before they're used.

Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville, Fla., July 20, 1939.

Good intentions go a long way, but they do not always get there.

Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Texas, Jan. 4, 1900.

No man's good intentions ever boosted him into the hero class.

Great Falls Tribune, Great Falls, Mont., Oct. 8, 1934.

More good intentions would be carried out if they didn't live forever.

Great Falls Tribune, Great Falls, Mont., April 21, 1935.

It takes a moral sprinter to keep pace with his good intentions.

Philadelphia Record, Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 23, 1900.

Most good intentions are damned by indefiniteness.

River Press, Fort Benton, Mont., Aug. 18, 1937.

A man never catches up with his good intentions for tomorrow.

Saturday Evening Post, Philadelphia, Pa., April 18, 1903.

Even the road to hell that is paved with good intentions has a lot of chug holes.

Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, Aug. 23, 1934.

Good intentions are fine if they are self-starters but not so fine if they have to be cranked.

Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah, Aug. 1, 1917.

The good intentions man who is always going to turn over a new leaf has been known to lose his place entirely.

Madisonville Democrat, Madisonville, Tenn., Jan. 2, 1956.

It takes constant use to keep good intentions from getting rusty.

New York Times, New York, N.Y., Feb. 12, 1905.

Good intentions are often like an alarm clock that doesn't go off.

New York Times, New York, N.Y., Feb. 19, 1905.

The reason the road to ruin is always in excellent condition is because it is continually being resurfaced with good intentions.

Idaho Statesman, Boise, Idaho, Jan. 4, 1925.

More by this Author


1 comment

Motown2Chitown 5 years ago

Thought provoking and inspiring! Drop by and follow me if you're interested! Thanks for the read!

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working