Inspirational and Insightful Quotations #78 - Friendship

Quotations on Friendship

Why are we not more perfect in the practice of the principles of friendship, love and truth? The reasons are not difficult to explain. Our own individual selfishness is retarding our spiritual growth. A oneness of purpose as is contemplated by the practice of these principles is not developed within us as it should be. We have here the principles to develop a oneness of purpose. We are so busy with the selfish pursuits of life that we scarcely take notice of those principles that we have sworn to develop in our souls. We even go farther and bring these selfish interests into our lives and instead of learning the principles of friendship, love and truth, we want to play the game of marbles and when the test comes we cannot pass the examination which has been placed before us.

Some of us seem to think that we can indulge in selfish pursuits and acquire the temporal things of life and also life a life of friendship, love and truth; in my opinion you cannot do so; the selfish pursuits crush out these principles and are opposed to them. This selfishness develops the habit of getting for ourselves, and the development of these principles results in giving instead of the acquiring and receiving. We act as if we can take our acquired selfish products and wares with us after death, but the indulgence of this illusion is folly. The laws of nature are firmly and well established, and she always requires a leveling and distributing of these wares, if not to us, then to those who come after us. The good you do while here below illuminates the path love has paved for the feet of the philanthropist, while on his journey towards perfection. Why tarry here wasting time gathering those things of a temporal nature, in excess of what we need for legitimate use, when we know the truth written in Holy Writ, “What doth it profit a man if he gain the whole world and lose his own soul?” …

I would not have you become dissatisfied with your mental condition as we each may find ourselves in today. We all realize our frailties and imperfections, but these remarks should act as a stimulant to lay aside our marbles and take up our books. Mankind is only in the making, and the only difference amongst men is that some are more nearly finished than others. The world brotherhood is a word much more used today and greatly abused. A brotherhood based on economic principles will not last, nor a brotherhood based on mere sentiment. Men are here and now interdependent brothers in fact, and it is not so much a question of creating brotherhood as it is of recognizing its existence. Personal desires often conflict but as to their higher nature men are united.

Friendship, love and truth are the highest attributes in the human family, and a development of these principles in any organization of men or women will result in unity and concerted action of worthy deeds. The more we recognize these principles of our higher nature, the greater unity will prevail, and discord and strife will be reduced to minimum. Our fault in the past has been in recognizing only in vague and indistinct manner these principles. We have placed too much emphasis upon the development of our lower natures. Your best ideals of these virtues can only be created by harmony and unity. In seeking for the best in humanity many thinkers and writers have found their answer in the word love. That word is also much used and abused. If we understand that it means self-sacrifice, not self-gratification, then we shall avoid all misunderstanding on that point. We often based our idea of the word love in acquiring something for oneself. Where this notion prevails love is absent. That old and often repeated fallacy that to help others we must first help ourselves, does not appeal to those who are already tired and weary of themselves and seek to escape from the narrow path of selfishness.

---John Adams Sneddon, Logan Republican, Logan, Utah, May 1, 1913.

Friendship cannot exist alone; it supposes the existence of goodness in two or more persons; it is defined as mutual affection, cherished by two individuals of congenial minds. Intimacy resting on mutual esteem—it is only this kind of friendship that means anything. It is therefore of the highest importance that our regard for each other be based upon motives higher than self; but that this friendship may continue there is a necessity for another element, namely, truth. Truth is represented in garments as white as snow; her looks are serene, pleasant, courteous, cheerful and modest; she is the pledge of all honor, the chief joy of human society. Truth when reduced to practice in our lives produces the harmony of right doing.

---D.B. Lake, Nebraska Advertiser, Brownville, Neb., May 4, 1876.

Never lose a friend for a small price.

---Christian F. Reisner, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., June 17, 1909.

Man is under obligation to every friend he has, but it isn’t a real friend who takes advantage of the obligation.

---Liston Dickson Elkins, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., July 17, 1940.

You cannot enjoy a friendship until it becomes cumulative. To be enjoyable a friendship must become even a little more enjoyable every day. You must as the days come and go be able to find new strength of character in the friend; you must be able to find new variations of personality in the friend; you must be able to find almost unsuspected force of conviction in the friend; you must constantly be finding new ground in common with the friend. Each day in a friendship should be a day that adds just a little, but a significant bit, to the depth, the sincerity, the mutuality, the enjoyment. Then it has become a cumulative friendship, not an accumulation that spring up all at once, but something that grows bit by bit, meeting by meeting, association by association, appreciation by appreciation, measurement by measurement—a steady, cumulative process. Unless you are big enough for something to grow upon you are not big enough to grow. If you can hold a friendship for a thousand days without the friendship having grown upon you, you will never grow into a great friend.

---Henry Arnold “H.A.” Stallings, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., Jan. 23, 1934.

The real friend is one who does not keep a book account of the costs of his friendship.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 3, 1930.

You cannot have friendship without loyalty, and loyalty is not produced by laziness or loafing.

---W.T. Dorward, Milwaukee Sentinel, Milwaukee, Wis., Aug. 8, 1921.

Friends seldom go back on you unless you’ve gone back on yourself.

---B.C. Forbes, Milwaukee Sentinel, Milwaukee, Wis., Aug. 9, 1929.

The way to keep friends is to keep faith.

---Henry F. Cope, Lincoln County Leader, Toledo, Ore., March 22, 1907.

Friendship blooms only in the soul of a noble and self-sacrificing heart, casting a thousand rays of love, hope and peace to all around. It enters the abode of sorrow and wretchedness and causes happiness and peace.

---W.S.B. Ford, Newberry Herald and News, Newberry, S.C., April 27, 1900.

Friendship is the greatest force to cement all the good factors of social life.

---Marion E. Hudson, El Paso Herald, El Paso, Texas, July 31, 1920.

A great man is one who never neglects his old friends on account of his greatness.

---Carl J.G. Brown, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Jan. 24, 1921.

On the character of those whom we choose for our friends, our own character is likely to be formed.

---Theophile Meerschaert, The Indian Advocate, Sacred Heart, Okla., May 1905.

Sweet as the gushing fountain to the weary pilgrim on the parched and sandy desert is the smile of a friend to a wanderer in life’s thorny wilderness.

---W.C. Wilson, New Orleans Crescent, New Orleans, La., Nov. 11, 1868.

Friendship has its roots in a fine integrity of character. Friendship is brotherhood at its best. Despite our much talk of brotherhood the world is far from the attainment of that high ideal. Even in the most progressive nations we have a long way to go before all men recognize one another as brothers. But such an attainment would be little more than democracy at its best, and it is something toward which we must strive. Meanwhile, whether we are attached to others in friendship or not, whether we like them or not, we can treat them justly. And we can strive to establish for all the reality of those rights that in our democratic conceptions belong inherently to all.

---William E. Gilroy, Williamson Daily News, Williamson, W. Va., July 24, 1948.

Compliments are the jewels set in the circle of friendship.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 7, 1932.

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