International Poetry

Euterpe, Muse of Lyric Poetry and Music

Euterpe, Muse of Lyric Poetry and Music, was painted by Egide Godfried Guffens (1823-1901). This painting is in the public domain in the US and those countries with a copyright term of life of the artist plus 100 years or less.
Euterpe, Muse of Lyric Poetry and Music, was painted by Egide Godfried Guffens (1823-1901). This painting is in the public domain in the US and those countries with a copyright term of life of the artist plus 100 years or less. | Source

Poetry Forms

When I wrote Poetry Forms, it hadn't crossed my mind that I would be writing another article about types of poetry and that I was about to publish the first Hub in a new series. My article was so well-received, I did the research for a second article.

Forms of Poetry

My research produced Forms of Poetry, a showcase of poetic forms not derived from the English or Japanese languages.

While doing my research, I discovered dozens of poetic forms. I now know that I will be writing two—perhaps three—more articles which discuss the numerous forms in which poetry can appear.

As with Forms of Poetry, this article also discusses poetic forms not based upon the Japanese or English languages. Some, such as the rondeau and the terza rima, evolved into English language poetry forms.

I hope you will write poetry using the poetic forms described in my articles.

I hope you will write poetry.

Poetry Terms

A foot, a combination of stressed and unstressed syllables, is the smallest repeating pattern in a line of poetry.

Meter is the pattern of syllables in poetry—the arrangement of stressed and unstressed syllables in each line and the sequences that are used in multiple lines.

A syllable, usually counted by vowel sounds, is the most basic unit in a word. In a poem, syllables are either stressed or unstressed.

Non-Japanese and Non-English Poetry Forms

The poetry forms discussed in the section which follows began their lives not related to the English or Japanese languages. Some, such as the rondeau, evolved into English language forms of poetry.

Canzone (Italy)

A canzone is a Medieval Italian lyrical poem. It consists of one to seven 11-syllable stanzas set to music. Each stanza has the same number of lines, usually between eight and 20. Common themes in a canzone were dramatic events, longing, love, and nature.

Among the poets writing canzone were Boccaccio, Dante, Petrarch, and Spenser.

The following video by Eros Ramazotti is that of a modern-day canzone.

Eros Ramazotti: Se Bastasse Una Canzone (If I Had a Love Song)

Ghazal (Arabic-speaking Areas in the 6th Century)

The ghazal, a poetic form consisting of five to 15 rhyming couplets, originated in Arabic-speaking areas in the 6th century.

The poems have been written in a number of languages—Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Malay, Nepali, Pashto, Persian, Punjabi, Turkish and Urdu—with the primary language being Urdu.

The themes of love and loss and separation are frequently seen in ghazal poems. The poet's name is traditionally featured in the last verse of the poem.

German poet, novelist, artist, and politician Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) became interested in the ghazal, which caused the poetic form to be very popular in Germany in the 19th century.

Poet Agha Shahid Ali (1949 New Delhi, India-2001 Amherst, Massachusetts) wrote ghazal in English and a number of languages originating in the Indian Sub-Continent.

Urdu Hindi Ghazal Poetry

Victor Hugo (1802-1885)

This photograph of Victor Hugo was taken circa 1884 by Gaspard-Félix Tournachon (Felix Nadar). It is in the public domain in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less.
This photograph of Victor Hugo was taken circa 1884 by Gaspard-Félix Tournachon (Felix Nadar). It is in the public domain in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. | Source

Pantun (Malaysia), then Pantoum (France)

Pantuns were written in ancient Malaysia. In the 19th century, Victor Hugo, a novelist and poet whose major works include The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Les Misérables, became interested in the pantun. He brought this form of interlocking poetry to the attention of other French poets, who took the poetic form and developed the pantoum, a set of quatrains—four-line stanzas—which utilize refrains in a complex pattern.

A pantoum must have a minimum of three stanzas. There isn't any upper limit to the number of stanzas it may have.

In a pantoum, the second and fourth lines of each stanza are repeated as the first and third lines of the next stanza. The second line becomes the next first line, and the fourth line becomes the next third line. The final line of the poem—the fourth line of the last stanza—is used as the first line of the first stanza.

The refrains should ideally have a different meaning each time they are used. This can be accomplished by changing the context of the refrain with the text around it.

If a pantoum were comprised of three stanzas, the rhyming pattern would be as follows:

a
- b - a - b ... b - c - b - c ... c - a - c - c

Rondeau (France)

The rondeau was a poetic form which was set to music in France in the 14th and 15th centuries. It has become an English language poetic form which is now written without a musical accompaniment.

A rondeau is comprised of three stanzas containing a total of 15 lines, 13 of which are eight-syllable lines. The poem also has three rhymes.

There is a refrain which appears three times—as the beginning of the first line, the entire last line in the second stanza, and the entire last line of the third stanza.

Rhyming Patterns and Stanzas in a Rondeau

Stanza 1
a (includes the refrain) - a - b - b - a

Stanza 2
a - a - b - refrain c

Stanza 3
a - a - b - b - a - refrain c

John McCrae: In Flanders Fields (1915)

The best-known rondeau is the war memorial poem In Flanders Fields, written by a Canadian doctor, John McCrae (1872-1918). In 1915, while in charge of a field hospital during World War I, McCrae saw his friend killed. He wrote the poem the following day.

"In Flanders Fields" by John McCrae (read by Tom O'Bedlam)

Lord Byron (1798 London, England–1824 Missolonghi, Ottoman Empire [now Greece])

This painting of George Gordon Noel, 6th Baron Byron (popularly known as Lord Byron) is in the public domain due to its age.
This painting of George Gordon Noel, 6th Baron Byron (popularly known as Lord Byron) is in the public domain due to its age. | Source

Terza Rima (Italy)

The terza rima was developed by a major Italian poet in the Middle Ages, Durante "Dante" Alighieri (1265-1321). English language poets who wrote terza rima were Lord Byron, John Milton, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and—much later—Robert Frost and T.S. Elliott.

A terza rima is a series of triplets (3-line stanzas) with an interlocking rhyming pattern which often ends in a single line or a couplet. There isn't any restriction regarding the number of stanzas which may be used.

The rhyming pattern for a terza rima is as follows:

a - b - a ... b - c - b ... c - d - c ...

d - e - d ... e - f - e ... f - f

One of the best known terza rima, She Walks in Beauty, was written by Lord Byron. It is said that he wrote the poem about his cousin Mrs. Wilmot Horton, whom he had just met. Mrs. Horton was in mourning, wearing a black dress with spangles on it.

"She Walks in Beauty" by Lord Byron (read by Tom O'Bedlam)

Villanelle (Spain / Italy)

The villanelle originated in Spain and Italy as a ballad-like folk song without a strict format or length. Its current structure wasn't widely used until the 19th century, when it was popularized by French poet and author Théodore de Banville (1823-1891).

The villanelle, a 19-line poem consisting of five tercets (three-line stanzas) and a final quatrain (four-line stanza), has two refrains. The first and third lines of the first stanza are rhyming refrains. They alternate as the third line in the stanzas which follow, and they appear as a couplet—the final two lines—in the quatrain at the end of the poem.

Since the two refrains (repeating lines) play have such an important role in a villanelle, many poets write the refrains first, and fill in the other lines after that. As with many other modern-day poetic forms, most villanelles are now written in English.

"Do Not Go Gentle into that Great Night" by Dylan Thomas

Do Not Go Gentle into that Great Night by Welsh poet and writer Dylan Thomas (1914, Swansea, United Kingdom-1953, Greenwich Village, New York City) is considered by many to be the most famous villanelle. Following are three readings of the poem—by Dylan Thomas, Anthony Hopkins; and Rodney Dangerfield, in his role as Thornton Mellon in the movie Back to School.

Dylan Thomas

Anthony Hopkins

Rodney Dangerfield as Thornton Mellon in "Back to School"

Whose reading of "Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night" do you prefer?

See results without voting

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Comments 55 comments

Vellur profile image

Vellur 3 years ago from Dubai

Another great article on poetry forms. Now I know even more of poetry forms. Thanks to your extensive research work. Great work, voted up and shared across. Looking forward to more in this series.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Nithya (Vellur),

Thanks, once again, for being the first person to comment in another of my articles in my new poetry forms series. Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub.

I have been enjoying reading the haiku you have showcased recently. I'm looking forward to seeing you write some poetry in poetic forms which are "new" to you.


Mhatter99 profile image

Mhatter99 3 years ago from San Francisco

Masterfully done. The only way I can express how well you did is to share. thank you


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Martin (Mhatter99).

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I appreciate your very kind words and your sharing my Hub.

I hope you have a chance to read "Forms of Poetry." I published it a few days ago. I discussed international poetic forms in that article, too. The article only had one poetry reading in it...by our friend Vincent Moore.


Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

Gypsy Rose Lee 3 years ago from Riga, Latvia

Voted up and interesting. This was a fascinating journey in poetry. Passing this on. The videos were terrific.


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 3 years ago from New York

You lead us down the poetry lane

We now want to come back again

To learn more of this ancient lore

To which you've opened up that door.

What a great education you provide us with! So much I never learned in school. Thank you for this education.

Voted up, useful, awesome, and interesting. Shared so others can learn too!


DDE profile image

DDE 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

You certainly did a super job on international of poetry, an well presented hub and most informative


ImKarn23 profile image

ImKarn23 3 years ago

Daisy - are you a teacher of poetry? If not - you ought to be! Your knowledge is vast and interesting, and - i'm not a poetry kinda girl! lol..

I'd be embarrassed to have you read mine. All i can say about it is that - IT RHYMES!

lol

i'm learning...slowly but surely! Have a great week!

sharing forward


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Rasma (Gypsy Rose Lee),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub. I appreciate your support of my writing.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Devika (DDE),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I found so much material while doing the research for my recent Forms of Poetry article, I had to publish this Hub right away.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 3 years ago from Taos, NM

Very interesting and informative hub, Daisy. I knew of the European poems, especially those of Italy, but I did not know about the middle eastern poems. Thanks for introducing us to these different types of poems. Well done!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Leslie (ImKarn23),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. I appreciate your very kind words. I also appreciate your sharing my article.

I'm not a teacher of poetry. My educational background is in Fine Arts, art education, international business, and travel.

I wrote Poetry Forms, and the article was so well-received, I did the research for a second article. I found enough information for two international poetry articles, Forms of Poetry and this one.

Why don't you try your hand at writing haiku, senryu, or tanka? They're not too difficult to write.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Suzette (suzettenaples),

Thanks for reading the latest of my poetry forms articles and commenting in it. When I did the research for Forms of Poetry, I found so much material about international origins of poetry, I had to follow-up rather quickly with a second international poetry article.


janetwrites profile image

janetwrites 3 years ago from Georgia country

This is a very interesting poetry series. I have already enjoyed "Forms of Poetry" and this hub about "International Poetry" is also very informative and interesting. I also liked the videos you added. I should now read your former hubs about poetry.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Janet,

Thanks for reading my latest article about poetry forms and commenting in it. I was glad I found the poetry reading videos on YouTube.

Do you write poetry? Or do you just enjoy reading (and listening to) it?


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 3 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Dear Daisy,

This installment is richly detailed with videos as examples...I will need to visit several times to fully appreciate and absorb.

It is fairly safe to say the canzone is a form that will be enjoyed from a distance...what a strong and beautiful lyrical piece...incredible.

My vote went to Rodney...because I love seeing a funny man go outside his comfort zone...loved that movie so much.

You are raising our community's awareness of the most magical writing forms...Brava and I will be back often. Voted UP and UBI. Hugs, Maria


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Maria,

Thanks for reading my article and viewing the videos. I was both surprised and pleased to find so many examples of poetry readings on YouTube.

When I was doing the research for my second article in the series, Forms of Poetry, I found too many examples of international poetic forms to be included in the Hub. I immediately began work on this article.

Digressing slightly... Have you seen the movie "Back to School"? Please try to rent it if you haven't already seen it. It's an excellent vehicle for Rodney Dangerfield.


janetwrites profile image

janetwrites 3 years ago from Georgia country

Daisy,

thank you for asking.

I had been writing poetry when I was in my teens, in German of course. Then I stopped writing poems. I don't know why. Now I just like reading and listening to them. Maybe, I find the muse someday to write poems again.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Janet,

Thanks for stopping by again. I hope your muse returns.


livingsta profile image

livingsta 3 years ago from United Kingdom

Another useful and interesting information about poetry Daisy! Thank you for sharing!

P.S: I am not sure if it is the videos or pictures, that have not loaded, with white spaces beneath headings. Maybe an error.

Voted up and sharing!


janshares profile image

janshares 3 years ago from Washington, DC

This is a very informative hub and a gem for poets. Although I've about these forms, I've only attempted the pantoum. I will accept your challenge and work on another. Thank you, voted up, useful, and interesting.


Kathryn Stratford profile image

Kathryn Stratford 3 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

It's amazing how many types of poetry there are! Thank you so much for providing us with types.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Dahlia (livingsta),

Thanks for reading and commenting in the third article in my new series. I'm so sorry the videos haven't loaded. I haven't had any problems with them loading in IE 9 or Chrome.

If the problem persists for you, please let me know, and I'll do some investigating.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Janis (janshares),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I hadn't realized there were so many types of poetry until I began doing my research. I've lost count of the number of poetry forms I've found.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Kathryn,

Thanks for reading and comment in another article in my poetry forms series. I'm looking forward to reading some of your poetry.


midget38 profile image

midget38 3 years ago from Singapore

Hi Daisy, thanks for the shout out to my terra rima. So many forms of poetry and so fascinating!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Michelle (midget38)

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I was very happy to include a link to your terza rima, You created a great example of that poetry form.


jabelufiroz profile image

jabelufiroz 3 years ago from India

Informative. Voted up.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Firoz (jabelufiroz),

Thank you for reading my article and commenting in it. I appreciate it.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

Interesting, well informed and useful Daisy.

Voted up and shared.

Eddy.


Vincent Moore 3 years ago

Daisy you've done yourself proud once more with this magnificently brilliant study of poetry forms. The research put into this was staggering, I commend you dear poet and scribe. Keep up the great writing, you are gifted and so passionate. This will open the doors for many who have been struggling with ideas and forms of poetry, it should help many, as well open up many doors. Voted up, tweeted and shared.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Eddy (Eiddwen),

Thanks for reading and commenting in my article. I'm so pleased with the positive response I have received to the poetry forms series.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Vincent,

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I appreciate your very kind words. Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub.

When I wrote Poetry Forms, the first article in what was to become the poetic forms series, I knew I had written something special. I was very pleased with the article, but I had no inkling of the reaction my Hub with receive.

I found a lot of information regarding international forms of poetry while doing the research for my second article, Forms of Poetry, and this article. I hope the information will encourage established poets to try poetic forms which are new to them. I would be very interested in reading what they have scribed. I'd love to link to the poems in my next article in the series, Poetry Examples.


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 3 years ago

I remember when I took world poetry in college and it was not as fascinating as your post. Well done!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Dianna (teaches12345),

Thanks for reading my article and for posting your very kind words. I appreciate your support of my writing.


Docmo profile image

Docmo 3 years ago from UK

Fantastic article Daisy, Loved the various forms and learnt a lot of new detail I didn't know some of my favorite poems like ' She walks in beauty' and 'do not go gently into the night' were international poetic forms.. It has inspired me to consider writing a terza rima... up/awesome.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mohan (Docmo),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I appreciate your continuous support of my writing.

I find it interesting that a number forms of poetry thought by many to have originated in the English language are actually international poetic forms. I'm happy to learn that you are considering writing a terza rima. If Dante, Lord Byron, John Milton, and Percy Bysshe Shelley can write terza rima, so can you! After you publish your terza rima, I will be happy to include a link to it in this article.


alocsin profile image

alocsin 3 years ago from Orange County, CA

I'd heard about some of these forms (rondeau) but the others are quite exotic. I would love to have seen an example of a ghazal since this is the most exotic to me. I'll see if I can Google one. Voting this Up and Interesting.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Aurelio (alocsin),

Thanks for reading the third in my series of poetry forms articles.

You mentioned wanting to see an example of a ghazal. There is a link in my discussion of ghazal poetry to a ghazal poem, and the video immediately after the discussion is that of a ghazal.


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

Wow daisy! absolutely beautiful, and so full of info, this was fascinating reading. I did smile when I saw the results of the poll with Anthony hopkins coming out top with his reading, his voice is so amazing. Wonderful, voted up and shared across! nell


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Nell,

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub.

The poll is interesting, isn't it? I wanted to include a reading of "Do Not Go Gentle into that Great Night" in my article. When I found three so very different interpretations, I decided to include all three. Not surprisingly, Anthony Hopkins' reading has received the most views on YouTube.


ntd24 profile image

ntd24 3 years ago from Norwalk, Connecticut

Daisy,

Wow, this is an excellent hub. I recently taught an Honors Creative Writing class and covered many of these poetic terms and styles thoroughly. Here you highlight many of them, and offer examples and information on some forms that I know of only vaguely, like the Rondeau. I love the videos you have provided. My favorite was the reading of Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night" by Anthony Hopkins. It is a very powerful villanelle when read silently, and even more inspiring when read with the soft vocal grandeur that Hopkins applies.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Nick (ntd24),

Welcome to HubPages. It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it.

This is the third article I've written which discusses forms of poetry. When I began doing my research for the first article, I hadn't thought about writing a series, but I found so much interesting material, I couldn't stop at one Hub.

I'm currently writing the fourth article in the series. What's difficult about writing a series such as this one is that I can't repeat any material from one Hub to the next. Everything has to be original text.

The Hopkins reading of "Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night" has received the most views of the three on YouTube. My readers seem to appreciate that reading the most, too.


DeborahNeyens profile image

DeborahNeyens 3 years ago from Iowa

Poetry forms is a great idea for a series. I will need to check out the other hubs in the series. I'm not much of a poet myself, but every once in a while I am inspired to try out a new form of poetry as a personal challenge.

By the way, I love that you included the Rodney Dangerfield clip! : )


Vinaya Ghimire profile image

Vinaya Ghimire 3 years ago from Nepal

Daisy,

I have some idea about English and Japanese poetry forms, but other western poetry forms were completely new to me. I did not know Ghazals were composed in English. Though Nepalese singers have produced many Ghazal albums, Hindu Ghazals are very popular in Nepal.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Deb (DeborahNeyens),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. What's really exciting about this series of articles is that established poets have been writing poems in forms they've never tried before, and people new to poetry are now writing micropoems. I'm glad you liked Rodney Dangerfield's poetry recitation. It was a great moment in the movie.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Vinaya,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. Until I began doing the research for my second article in this series, I wasn't aware there were so many poetic forms not based upon English or Japanese. Ghazal poetry, for example, was completely new to me.


Vinaya Ghimire profile image

Vinaya Ghimire 3 years ago from Nepal

Daisy,

I'm working on two hubs on poetry. I'll be linking your hubs when my hub gets ready.

PS: Your score is still 100. Congrats. I have never reached there.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Vinaya,

Thanks for visiting again. This is the third of my three "poetry forms" articles. I'm glad that readers have been finding them useful.

Thanks, too, for your congratulations for my having attained a Hubber score of 100 for the first time in the nearly two years I have been writing for HubPages. I think that my having 86 Editor's Choice articles (71% of all of my Hubs) has helped with my reaching the 100 Hubber score.


jhamann profile image

jhamann 3 years ago from Reno NV

This is a well written reference for those who write and read poetry. Congratulations on a job well done. Sharing. Jamie


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Jamie (jhamann),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I appreciate your kind words. This is the third article I have published which deals with poetry forms. I hope you have an opportunity to read the other two.


vocalcoach profile image

vocalcoach 3 years ago from Nashville Tn.

Thank you Daisy for introducing these wonderful forms of poetry. You sure know your stuff. The video of Hopkins reading "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night" was so very stirring. I feel that I've learned so much more now about poetry forms. And with learning, comes an appreciation and respect. You never cease to amaze me. Voted across, except for funny, pinned and sharing.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Audrey (vocalcoach),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. Thanks, too, for pinning and sharing my Hub. I appreciate your very kind words and your continued support of my writing.

Hopkins' reading of "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night" is my favorite of the three. I agree with you that it is very stirring.

This is the third in what has become a series of poetry forms Hubs. After I published this article, I organized an International Poetry community on Google+. We have more than 280 members residing in 59 countries. Members post their poetry directly in the community or post links to works appearing online. What's great about this group is that the poems may be posted in any language, not just in English. I would be honored if you were join the community.


ChitrangadaSharan profile image

ChitrangadaSharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

Wonderful hub and very informative!

Thanks for educating us about other forms of Poetry in the world. My favourite is of course the Ghazals.

Since I joined International Poetry, my knowledge about different forms of Poetry has only increased. I feel happy and honoured to be a part of International Poetry Community.

Thanks for sharing your knowledge!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Chitrangada,

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I'm glad you found my Hub to be informative.

The International Poetry community I formed on Google Plus is a great group. I decided to organize it after I wrote this article.

We have more than 325 members residing in 63 countries, with posts being permitted in any language, not just English. I'm amazed that poets and poetry lovers from so many communities have expressed interest in being part of the group.

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