Is it ITS or IT'S? And is it YOUR or YOU'RE?

How to spell "It's" and "Its," "Your and "You're."

These two sets of pronoun problems come up a lot, and, frankly, they can be confusing. The simple fact is that the English language is confusing. English is like a beautiful woman: alluring and sensual, filled with promise and possibilities... and totally prone to randomly changing the rules.

The worst part about this "its - it's" thing and the "your - you're" thing is that we've already learned that crap like at least two or three times before. So, whatever it is about them, learning it just never seems to stick.

Until now.

With the right degree of immature examples and some explication, hopefully when you reach the bottom of this hub, you will finally have this garbage sorted out, the confusion forever put away. The point is not only to explain it, but to make it permanent. So, here goes:

Pronouns: A quick refresher

If you totally remember all your pronoun stuff from school, you can jump right over this section. But for those with a bit of rust on this stuff, I'm going to rekindle some old memories so that what follows will make perfect sense.

Pronouns are words used in place of other nouns, regular old boring ones and "proper" ones like names. (Nouns, I'm sure you recall, are words for a "person, place or thing.") In school you learned something that looks like this:

Personal Pronouns

These are the PERSONAL pronouns.  It's these basic ones to which this hub refers.
These are the PERSONAL pronouns. It's these basic ones to which this hub refers.

You remember that stuff? You probably got beat to death with that stuff in school like all the rest of us, but it was so boring, and you really wanted to go out to recess, or pass notes to your friends, so you didn't pay any attention. That's ok, nobody else did either, which is why so many of us screw this stuff up today.

Hey, at least you're here now.

So, those are "pronouns" and you stick them in sentences rather than the name of stuff, in place of nouns (words that name something, like: table, rock, Mars, Susan and Metropolitan Museum of Arts).

So, with that refreshed, lets see an example of a pronoun replacing a noun:

The pronoun "he" replaces the proper noun "Dave."
The pronoun "he" replaces the proper noun "Dave."
The cat ate the hamster. -- The cat ate it.  (Cartoon courtesy of Lauren.)
The cat ate the hamster. -- The cat ate it. (Cartoon courtesy of Lauren.)

Another example: The cat ate the hamster.

Rewritten with 3rd person pronoun:

  • It ate the hamster.

OR:

  • The cat ate it.

"It" can fill in for any inhuman noun, or even a human one if you want to be insulting.

So, pronouns are cool, and they are obviously useful. But, they make stuff confusing, particularly when it comes to using "apostrophes" (which are those little marks that separate the ‘s from the rest of words in case you forgot.)

So, with that little refresher out of the way, let's get to the point.

What the heck is Fred feeding this thing?  (Cartoons courtesy of Lauren)
What the heck is Fred feeding this thing? (Cartoons courtesy of Lauren)
No, seriously, I shouldn't have.  Don't eat glass.
No, seriously, I shouldn't have. Don't eat glass.

Possession Is Where People Get Confused

Ok, so we mentioned the punctuation mark "the apostrophe" a second ago. The apostrophe is really the confusing issue here, more so than the pronoun use. Everyone remembers being in taught in school that you use an apostrophe for two things:

  • 1. To show ownership or possession - "Fred's dog has gas" (Fred owns the dog with gas)
  • 2. To indicate missing portions/parts of a word or contraction - "I shouldn't eat glass." (I should not do that)

So, if you remember that part, you're in decent shape so far. The problem is when we come to pronouns AND possession, the whole thing gets muddled up in our heads.

In the case of "its" or "it's" the rules seem totally overlapped. The confusion comes from the fact that "it is" contracts to "it's" with an apostrophe, BUT, if I want to show ownership of something, then I'm supposed to use an apostrophe too, right? So, if I want to write a sentence about how my dog licks his own butt, I should use an apostrophe just like the stinking rule says, right? So, I should write: "My dog licks it's butt?"

Right?

Maybe?

"IT'S" is a contraction of "it" and "is."
"IT'S" is a contraction of "it" and "is."

NOPE, that's the hawt woman changing her mind thing about English, and where we get confused.

The correct form is just "its" with NO apostrophe. So, I want to write, "My dog licks its butt."

Which is great, but how the heck are you supposed to remember that, right? You may be thinking, "I understand that here, right now, but I still get confused as hell when I'm trying to write something on my own, and unless I can somehow find a way to remember this garbage, I will be confused again in a week."

Well, here's how you keep it straight, and it gets back to pronouns.

Pronouns Don’t Get Apostrophes for Ownership

That's pretty much the secret right there. The rules you know about apostrophes really do hold up in all cases EXCEPT for when you are using a pronoun. So, remember that. And here is something that will help.

Pronouns have their own special possessive forms. Their own little private indicators of ownership. And because they get their own unique words, they don't need fancy extra punctuation like an apostrophe. Here they are:

Take a good look at the plural forms. Notice "yours," "his," "hers," "its," "ours," "yours" and "theirs" all don't have any apostrophes? Look again; they don't. They have "s" endings, but no apostrophe. They don't need them. I think this is where the potential for confusion comes into play.

 

Look at all the pronouns up there that end is "s." And think about it, the ones that get confusing are the ones that end with "s": the "its" and "yours" as the title of this hub suggests. The reason for that is because there are contractions for "it" and "your" ("it is" and "you are" that become "it's" and "you're") that people see all the time, and use all the time - so much that the whole thing starts to scramble in our brains.

So, to help you keep yourself straight, I want you to focus for a moment just on the clearest ones: His, Hers.

 

You wouldn't even consider putting an apostrophe in those would you? I mean, they do show ownership don't they? So, technically, by the same logic that confuses you with "its" and "it's" shouldn't you get confused with "hers" and "hers?" Shouldn't an apostrophe go in there? You already know the answer; you just haven't actually looked at why you know before. So, let's do that.

(Courtesy of Lauren)
(Courtesy of Lauren)

  • His dog has horrible gas.
  • The cat puking behind the couch is hers.

There are zero apostrophes in there. His and Hers don't get them, and you are totally fine with that, because you know these words are possessive forms. What you never really did was think about the fact they are pronouns. Hopefully, from now on, you will, at least subconsciously.

Now look at the rest of the possessive pronouns ending with an "s."

  • The cat is ours.
  • The hamster the cat is eating is theirs.
  • Oh, is that hamster yours?
  • The hamster has lost its head.

See? Just "s" no apostrophes.

ITS and YOURS are in there... right alongside HIS and HERS. Get them grouped up in your head as possessive pronouns and you won't mess up.

So, now you know. If it is a pronoun that owns something, there is no possessive punctuation. Just the word. Now, if it's a contraction that's a different deal.

Notice whole face jammed together.  That's what happens with contractions.
Notice whole face jammed together. That's what happens with contractions.

A Quick Note on Contractions

If you forgot what a contraction is, it's basically when two words get jammed together and a letter (or more) gets dropped out. Think of the look on a woman's face when she's having a contraction... notice how her eyes are jammed closed and her eyebrows are jammed together? See how the skin on her forehead crinkles up, all jammed together in rows? I'm not even going to mention the other stuff going on. Anyway, that's a contraction. Lots of jamming together. And, obviously, something is going to drop out after all that.  Words work the same way.  Well, sort of.

Examples:

  • "could not" becomes "couldn't"
  • "have not" becomes "haven't" etc.

When we get to pronouns, that rule doesn't change. When two words get jammed together and some letters get dumped (or one word with dumped letters too, technically), you get to use the contraction apostrophe rule.

This is where "it is" becomes "it's" and where "you are" becomes "you're." If you get confused, say the sentence with the contraction unfolded, so if you write, "The hamster lost it's head" and it doesn't look right, say it out loud with no contraction: "The hamster lost it is head." Then you'll know it's not what you wanted. However, if you write, "It's time to get a new hamster" and then you say it outloud and in full, you'll see you have: "It is time to get a new hamster," which makes sense and lets you know you have used your apostrophe correctly.

Some sample contractions

Contractions are not just about babies; they're about TWO words and missing letters (vowels usually).
Contractions are not just about babies; they're about TWO words and missing letters (vowels usually).

Etc., etc.

So now you know. The simple rule is this: PERSONAL PROUNOUNS that OWN something, DON'T get to own an apostrophe too. Pronouns are stand-ins. They aren't real nouns. FRED is a noun. FRED can own a dog and an apostrophe because Fred is a real person, an actual noun, and can handle having that much stuff in his life. The word "his" is a little weak ass word; it's a pronoun. In fact, it's so weak, they had to give it the "pro" part to make it feel special since it had such low self esteem. In reality, it's just a puny little fake noun. Look at it; it can only afford three letters. It damn sure can't afford to own a dog AND an apostrophe. So, if you use it, it's just going to be "His dog licks its butt." Same goes for "ours," "yours" and "its." They're little baby words and they just can't afford to own anything beyond the object to which they refer, which means, no apostrophe.

Now, there are some bigboy pronouns out there that do get an apostrophe, like "anyone's" or "somebody's", but those are what they call "Indefinite pronouns" and, frankly, I bet you don't screw them up as it is. In fact, I only put this disclaimer in here in case some grammar nazi shows up trying to show off or for the one person who might be going, "Hey, wait...?" So, just remember these little wiener personal pronouns can't hold up an apostrophe, and let the rest work like they always have for you.

So that's it. I hope it helps. I hope the next time you're writing something about how your dog licks its butt and how it's the most disgusting thing you've ever seen, I hope you can get the apostrophes right. :)

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Comments 57 comments

Jewels profile image

Jewels 7 years ago from Australia

Oh! I think you're gorgeous. It's time however, that an English Professor helped me out with bare and bear. Could you, would you? I've always been good with their, there and they're, and your above lessons, but having trouble with the b words.


Lissie profile image

Lissie 7 years ago from New Zealand

A million years ago I attended Wellington Girls' College. I will never ever forget that the college which belongs to each every one of the girls (that was an eye-opener) so Girls needs the possesive form but because the noun is already plural so the ' goes at the end phew! Its a tough this English grammar stuff!


Lissie profile image

Lissie 7 years ago from New Zealand

Jewels in general bears are bare because they don't wear clothes: and that's the bare truth!


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

Jewels, I'm not a professor, just a pedantic English major, but I will put that on my list of hubs to write.  In fact, this hub is in response to a request a few folks made on another of my didactic, blow-hard hubs, so I finally got around to doing it.  Lissie has a good start on a mnemonic, but even that leaves out how the bear bears baring his soul and, barring confusion, has no bearing on how a bare bear might bear the cold of the Bering straight, much less gets his bearings in all that snow along the coast.

And yeah, Lissie, it was hard not to turn this into an apostrophe hub, but I didn't want to make it any longer than it already is.


Rochelle Frank profile image

Rochelle Frank 7 years ago from California Gold Country

Bears would be bare except for their hair, and that's not a barefaced lie.

Please bear wih me, if you care, I'm barely starting to cry.


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

LOL, Rochelle, Lizzie, we should team up and make a hub filled with all the silly grammar rhymes we were loaded up with as kids. Either be funny or depressing lol.


Rochelle Frank profile image

Rochelle Frank 7 years ago from California Gold Country

ok(but I made it up on the spot-- another annoying habit of mine)


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

Not annoying, mine was off the cuff too, just not as funny. I still think my favorite English teacher story is about how Winston Churchill messing with his speech writer who had just called Sir Winston out for ending a sentence with a preposition. Churchill said (roughly): Well, that is the type of writing up with which I will not put.

That dude was awesome.


Jewels profile image

Jewels 7 years ago from Australia

So if I was to say I can't bare not knowing the difference between a grizzley bear and the bare truth that Shadesbreath is my English Professor with a major, would that be right?  So bear only ever relates to the hairy monster?

See, Rochelle and Lizzie, you said please bear with me.  I get confused, thinking this should be bare with me. See how I get confused!  This one doesn't make sense to me.  The moon must have been in the wrong place when I had that english lesson.  It has never stuck, yet I can get all the others.

And what if I was to bear (bare) my bum in the main street of your town.  Is it bear or bare?  And don't say it depends on whether a person has a hairy arse or not.


Rochelle Frank profile image

Rochelle Frank 7 years ago from California Gold Country

No, you can bear a burden-- or you you can't bear to hear something.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 7 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

Great Hub Shades, even as an English person who loved the subject, I still get some of the apostrophe's wrong for sure :)


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

Jewel's, actually it's probably easier to just drop the "B" and see what you got left. "Bare" become "are" as in, you ARE naked, has to do with baring yourself or something else. "Bear" becomes "ear" which animals do have (so that's the animal), and an "ear" is what you hear with, like, when the bear is roaring at you and you can't bear the noise.

That's the best I can come up with off the cuff, hope it helps. lol

Misty, English is like that. I'm sure y'all catch stuff I don't even know I do wrong all the time and are just too nice to say anything. lol. I write these English hubs, but I don't claim to know all the tricks. English is a fickle mistress.


Misha profile image

Misha 7 years ago from DC Area

Come on Shades, even my knows how it should been, I were not believe native speaker's possible can will mess it up :D


Rochelle Frank profile image

Rochelle Frank 7 years ago from California Gold Country

I think the apostophes are the easiest part: they mean a letter (a vowel) IS MISSING.

"You're " always means "You are" if you're not able to substitute  "you are" in a sentence  where containing "You're", it is wrong.

 ie.

You're going to regret this. 

You are going to regret this.

 

If you use the "your" it is a possevive form of you:

Your fly is open-- means the fly belonging to you

Your grammar stinks--means the grammar you use, (which belongs to you) is substandard and emits an offensive odor.

No personal affronts here, it's (it is) all a matter of making things standard so that none of us thinks that anyone should be judged an idiot on the basis of simple gramatical errors.

 As matter of fact-- I only learned the the difference between "Its" and "It's" a few years ago, thanks to a very helpful editor. I can hardly believe I could earn a degree without knowing that simple fact. Now that it was explained so kindly to me-- I will remember.

I ALWAYS thought that a possessive needed an apostrophe. In this case it does not.

Another editor I knew always insisted that we never use words like "don't, isn't, wouldn't"-- but use "do not, is not, and would not" instead.

Terms like its and it's- engender the confusion between possessive and contraction.

 

Sorry if this made things more confusing "It's (it is) not always easy."


Rochelle Frank profile image

Rochelle Frank 7 years ago from California Gold Country

Bear Vs. Bare===

 

 The "ear" thing works for animals, but the verb form of bear, means to carry.

Beware of bears bearing gifts. My hub on homophones references an example of hunting bears while bare with beer--  They all sound similar depending upon regional pronunciations. see:

http://hubpages.com/literature/It-Sounds-Right--So...


Mighty Mom profile image

Mighty Mom 7 years ago from Where Left is Right, CA

Thank you, Mr. Shadesbreath! You should bottle and sell this stuff to English teachers everywhere! And that includes the delightfully graphic graphics:-)!


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 7 years ago from St. Louis

Superb job, as always!


ajcor profile image

ajcor 7 years ago from NSW. Australia

Thanks Shadesbreath - you've achieved great clarity as always!


Writer Rider 7 years ago

When you're typing, especially when you're typing fast, it's easy to make that typo even though you know the rules.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 7 years ago from St. Louis

Sorry, I got called away. Where was I...oh yeah. You would make a great teacher. Especially if you used examples like the ones above: the cat ate the hamster, Fred's dog has gas, et. al. Kids would actually love going to grammer class! That would be amazing right there. Of course you could tailor these depending on the age and group of students, like, "They're not accepting Muffy to Vasser", or "Willie popped a cap in their ass." Your students would be riveted and actually learn something. Good job!


Mighty Mom profile image

Mighty Mom 7 years ago from Where Left is Right, CA

Willie popped a cap in their ass?!! The ass of whom, pray tell?


Rochelle Frank profile image

Rochelle Frank 7 years ago from California Gold Country

Might it be asses? Their seems to indicate a plural possesive, unless it was a jointly owned jackass.


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

LOL Rochelle rompeth merrily upon the grammatical playground. I'm glad you are getting as much fun out of this thing as I did, and you bring as much more too.

Thanks MM, both you and Christoph hit on the teaching thing. I probably would enjoy teaching were it not for the absolute abysmal nightmare all the teachers in my family describe schools to be these days. Idiot administrators trying to impose blanket teaching techniques upon them, and quite unconcerned for whether it works or not, just make sure you do the program to ensure funds next year. Bleh. Not for me. But I do agree, particularly with what you said CHristoph, kids will learn if you make it fun. I'm pretty sure the schools would require that I keep my lesson plans boring and uncontroversial, so my kids would not learn or I'd get fired for breaking the rules.

Writer Rider: Yeah, I do that all the time. I bet nine thousand people are gonna call out all my "it's" that pop up wrong in comments now, because "it's" is what my fingers pop out for whatever reason most of the time. I even do "their" for "there" sometimes too.


Jewels profile image

Jewels 7 years ago from Australia

Well Arse is the buttocks. Ass is the mule. So one could get confused in it's application. In Australian vulgarity, using the sentence "up your's", would be referring to arse. You are an idiot - we would say: You're an Ass. But I get a bit confused when someone says Asshole, cause it could be Arsehole. But comparing a human arse to a jackass is possibly splitting hairs and so either would be acceptable!

Shades, I think I've dragged your eloquent apostrophe hub into the gutter.


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

LOL ... when did it become eloquent? With all the farting and butt licking dogs, eviscerated hamsters, cat's barfing and glass eating, I was really hoping it would be anything but! Frankly, I think a discussion on ass vs arse is entirely in keeping with the spirit of the hub. :)


Jewels profile image

Jewels 7 years ago from Australia

Righto then, I take it back.


spryte profile image

spryte 7 years ago from Arizona, USA

Shade - seriously, have you given any thought to compiling your grammar hubs into a book and peddling it to people that are learning English as a second language?  Or even for those that just still have difficulty with it as a primary language! 

I haven't had the problem with it's, its, your and you're...but I did like learning a new trick about how to know if it's used correctly rather than relying on microsoft word to save me.  Thanks :)


Rochelle Frank profile image

Rochelle Frank 7 years ago from California Gold Country

Though British English seems a little cumbersome to me I think "arse" might be an improvement and a needed distinction from the equine term. Also, it sound more polite. (Though I don't know if Shades appreciates this).

Certain  common grammatical and homophonic ( this has nothing to do with gender preference) errors just seem against nature-- though I am naturally a terrible speller. I really have to work at it, so maybe that is why I am so  critical of these errorrrs. (Ooops.)


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

Yeah, Spryte. I'm not so sure a book is in order yet, but I have given some consideration to making these hubs into a Flagship hub. I have some others in the works too.

Rochelle, I agree, there is definitely a place where "arse" is the appropriate choice, but I have to say, my general temperment is as you suggest, and in favor of the most offensive term available that can still be construed as appropriate. Right up to the line, but not more than a frog's hair past.


spryte profile image

spryte 7 years ago from Arizona, USA

BTW - Tell Lauren I LOVE Fred's dog! Awesome job!


Shalini Kagal profile image

Shalini Kagal 7 years ago from India

Entertaining hub while it educates - you really should think of doing a book - it might give Eats, Shoots and Leaves a run for its money! Love the blackboard bits :)


CJStone profile image

CJStone 7 years ago from Whitstable, UK

Very well explained shadesbreath. Trouble is, even though I know all this, those pesky little apostrophes still keep poppin up all over the place where they shouldn't be. It's a law of nature, like the lost socks in a washing machine. No matter how many times you check a text for apostrophes, you will still put them in the wrong places. Damn it man, even Shakespear buggered up his apostrophes every so often.


The Indexer profile image

The Indexer 7 years ago from UK

It's really very simple. At the age of seven I remember being told to think of an apostrophe as a gravestone - a letter has died, and the apostophe marks the place where it used to be. The problem with "its" is that it is a possessive, and possessives are usually marked by an apostrophe - but you wouldn't write "hi's" would you?

As for "your" and "you're" there really is no excuse. Getting this wrong is just being sloppy and deserves a slap on the wrist! Remember the gravestone rule and you won't go far wrong!

Meanwhile, check my longstanding "grammar" hubs which explain all this and a lot more besides!


Constant Walker profile image

Constant Walker 7 years ago from Springfield, Oregon

Good Eng Lit hub, Shades.  These kind of contractions have never been a problem for me.  I learned early (I must have had a good teacher) that the apostrophe is taking the place of a letter - or showing ownership.

What I don't get is where "reletive" went.  Didn't there used to be two spellings for that word, meaning different things?  Now they're both spelled "relative." Hu!


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

Spryte, I will tell her for sure.  She'll be happy to know she has a fan of her art.

Shalini, thanks.  Maybe I should think about a book.  God knows kids these days need one.  (LoL, I just said "kids these days."  That's a sign I'm getting old.)

CJ, yeah, I have a default finger-setting that makes my "it's" all the same.  I have to go back and cull them on pretty much everything I write.  Just type too fast I guess.  I don't make old Shakespeare messing them up, or anyone else who knows and just butchers typing.  There's a difference between knowing and doing.  Some don't know for sure though, so this is my attempt to throw them a rope.

Gravestone, I hear you for the most part. It is simple if you got the right teacher when you were at the right age (and assuming you were interested enough to listen, as many weren't lol). I hit on that "he's" thing up there too with my "her's" idea. I would say that to assert messing up "your" and "you're" is a sign of sloppiness might only be true for some. The truth is, not everyone learned this stuff. Sure, technically, they should have, but does wrist slapping really work in the big picture past high-school?

The way I figure it, it's "better late than never" and I'd rather see people face their grammar inadequacies (made worse by judgmental 'grammar nazis' giving them grief), and just learn the stuff. People don't like being uncomfortable with their writing, and most are too embarassed in their adulthood to admit they didn't learn that stuff. That's why I try to help without seeming like I'm slapping wrists. I was 24 years old before I knew how percentages/decimals/and fractions worked the same basic mathematical idea. For me to judge someone else's grammar would make me a hypocrit the way I see it. (Unless they do it wrong on purpose, and then, well, that's a different conversation all together).

CW: Thanks man. I'm not sure about the "reletive" thing. Never seen it like that. I'mma go look it up right now.


Ananta65 7 years ago

Its a great hun, Shadesbreath! Your always so good at writing these things. Their will be a time (I hope) that I can be as eloquent as your!


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

Thanks Ananta, you're responses are always appreciated. Someday you will be as eloquent as me. Its just a matter of time.


gwendymom profile image

gwendymom 7 years ago from Oklahoma

Shades, I am sorry it took me so long to getting around to reading this. Anytime there is learning involved my eyes glaze over and music starts playing in my head, and well it just goes downhill from there. I did get through this however without any music or galzed eyes, well maybe one glazed eye but that was due to the margarita binge last night. You have done a great job of teaching people like me how to use our it's and its, you're and yours, and well that's not an easy task. I think you should write a book, or teach a class or something. You have a gift of making learning fun.


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

Gwendy, it's ok. You don't have to apologize for not getting to my hubs quickly or even at all every time. I totally understand. I'm the WORST for keeping up on everyone's hubs. I mostly read books, so when I have reading time, I do that any and all possible moments. I jump on here, dash off some random idea, and I'm out. That said, I'm glad you found this. You're the third person who mentioned the book idea. Maybe I ought to stop thinking about it and just do it. Apparently there's a market out there for grammar books with farting dogs and dead hamsters. :)


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 7 years ago from St. Louis

Yea! And maybe you can make the book "scratch 'n sniff", and little batteries that make farting sounds! That's money right there.

I also meant to ask who Lauren was regarding the cartoons. Tell her she has another fan.


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

LOL @ Scratch-n-Sniff.  How hilarious would that be?  All examples about farts and vomit and dead stuff.  Hah, that would be great.

And Lauren is my little girl (well, 15 now, but still my baby).  She's an amazing artist.  She cranks out cartoons like that for me in like, 10 minutes each, in MS Paint of all the clunky, un-refined programs. They say you can't make a silk purse from a sow's ear, but Lauren can sure make silk purses WITH a sow's ear.  Look for her in the credits of Disney or Pixar movies in about 8 years (seriously). She'll be glad to know her fan base is growing, so I will tell her.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 7 years ago from St. Louis

Wow. No shit? I thought it was your wife (no kidding, using an affected style, of course, very charming.)


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 7 years ago from South Africa

I am not pedantic about too many things but the subjects of your Hub do get me going sometimes! The issue of the possesive apostrophe is one that gets to me. But the one that most gets my angry up is the your - you're issue. People who use these two words incorrectly seem to me to be not really knowing, or thinking about, what they are talking about. Anyway thanks again for the Hub.


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

You're welcome and thanks for the kind comment. :)


Robin Marie profile image

Robin Marie 7 years ago from USA

I never knew grammar and punctuation could be so much fun.

Excellent!


RGraf profile image

RGraf 7 years ago from Wisconsin

Thank you for the interesting grammar lesson. I wish all my English teachers taught like this.


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

Thanks Robin and RGraf


pop tina profile image

pop tina 7 years ago from Greece

I really enjoyed the examples you used! I teach English to Greek students and we also insist on the discrimination between whose and who's as well. Their and there seem to be quite confusing at times. Wish my students could read your hub! Excellent work!


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

Thanks, pop tina. The right examples totally change the tone of an explanation, hopefully from what could be dry and awful to at least a bit of fun.


Sexy Health profile image

Sexy Health 7 years ago from Portland, OR

Oh my goodness - You are great! I am in love with language, and a critic of the English language. I am always correcting people, but I guess you do it a little more elegantly, in print. Thanks again for sharing.


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 7 years ago from California Author

Thanks for saying so. Nice to know I'm not the only geek out there. lol. (Cute kid, btw.)


mysterylady 89 profile image

mysterylady 89 5 years ago from Florida

Since you have not published your pigeon hub yet (hint, hint), I decided to read an old one. You would make an excellent teacher of grammar, and you had me in stitches. I also loved some of the comments.

Maybe you addressed this in another hub. I can kinda understand people confusing there, they're, and their, but I do not understand their. Oh, well...


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 5 years ago from California Author

Hey, long time no see. YEah, I admit to being lazy on hubs lately. School takes up a lot of time so I spike in activity during summer and winter breaks. Plus, I started a blog to follow the progress of my decision to self publish one of my novels (http://daultonbooks.blogspot.com/) so I confess to cheating on HubPages with Blogger over the last week or so.

As for the their/their, the reason people mess that up is the "i before e" rule. People get that sucker ground into their heads and sometimes it's hard to shake. :)

I'd love to teach grammar. It's not the horrible evil people think it is. Not only can it be fun to learn, it empowers writing once you understand how it works and how little power it really has over us.


mysterylady 89 profile image

mysterylady 89 5 years ago from Florida

Hi, Stranger. After I comment on this, I'll check out your blog. As soon as I signed out, I realized peoople mess up "their" because of that rule. It has so many exceptions.

I enjoyed teaching literature more than teaching grammar because I could have more fun with it, but I did have fun teaching "lie" and "lay."(lol)

If you can find the time, check out my cat hubs. I thought about you as I was writing them.

BTW, I love the illustrations. Your daughter is very talented.

I just tried to check out your blog and got the message that it does not exist!


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 5 years ago from California Author

That's weird. I just went to it, and it says the same thing, but then, if you click on the underlined title of the blog, it takes you to the blog.

At least it did me. I know the link is working through facebook. Try again if you get a chance, or try the link on my profile? (You can even just Google "the lone writer" - in quotes - and find it. Wonder why the link is doing that.

Gonna go read your cat hub. :)


mysterylady 89 profile image

mysterylady 89 5 years ago from Florida

"If at first you don't succeed..." I went to your profile and had no problem finding your blog. What a nightmare! Entertainingly told, but still a nightmare. I admire your perseverence. I cannot even deal with Internet Explorer acting up and FlashPlayer disappearing!

Of course, I wish you the best of luck. I have faith in your writing - I know it must be good - I just don't have faith in the idiots you may continue to encounter.


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 5 years ago from California Author

Heh, yeah, it is what it is. It's still not officially up, but I think it's getting close. Uh, maybe. LOL. And thanks for your confidence. Let's hope you are right about me, and I have some luck with those who share the industry with me.

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