Krishna in the Morning

Two of the Low-down-types at the back. Mummy, Daddy and me

Source

Lunch time was always a bridge in time. The morning was over, but nothing had happened.

I had woken when Krishna came into the room and had brought me out of light sleep as his dry feet moved over the dry floor. Krishna always walked so quietly, so as not to wake the Chota Sahib. He walked so quietly, but when he saw that I was awake, he spoke, almost intoned, as if it were his little mantra, the words: “Sahib! Sahib! Chota Sahib!” and I knew that the day had begun, and that Krishna, my Krishna, was there to start it with me.

I heard the soft, dry sound of Krishna’s bare feet on the dry floor, and the fluttering sound that his feet made on the coir matting. There were bare floor boards just near the door, and around the wall, but the centre of the room was covered in a coir mat… coir matting. And in the middle of the coir matting stood my bed.

The bed stood in the middle of the room; draped in white mosquito netting. If I pressed my face closely against the netting I could see Krishna as he moved around the room, first with the big water jug out of which he poured a tumbler of water for me, and then I would watch while he poured water into a large bowl for me to wash my face. Beside the bowl, on the table top, stood an open tin of tooth powder. Krishna had already dipped my toothbrush into the water… shaken it so that it was just damp… and then dipped the bristles of the brush into the tooth powder. I hated that tooth powder. It was pink and it tasted of… tasted of nothing, really. It just tasted nasty, and when I had brushed my teeth, there was always some of the tooth powder left in the part of my mouth between my bottom teeth and my bottom lip. And if I put my tongue into that place and tried to remove that gritty powder, it just wouldn’t come until I had washed my mouth with water.

There was a toothpowder that tasted of bananas. I knew there was, and I asked Mummy if I could change to that one. Mummy said, “No! That’s for children and it isn’t very good”. I was a child…Why couldn’t I have the tooth powder? But no.

I wasn’t allowed to get out of bed until Krishna had prepared my tumbler of water or my tooth brush or my bowl. I had to wait until Krishna brought my chapals.

He always gave the one word warning, “Scorpion!” and then added, “Chota Sahib”. Then he would reach under the bed and bring out my chapals, walk towards the open window which looked out onto the veranda and reaching out as far as he could, would bang the chapals together. Holding each leather chapal by the heel and he would bang them together. Not once. Not twice. But three times. Always three times.

Everybody knew that scorpions would climb into chapals while people slept. And then they would bite you on the toes when you put them on in the morning, then you would most probably die. But Krishna always walked with bare feet. Maybe scorpions don’s bite people like Krishna.

Scorpions weren’t very nice. They would wait until you weren’t expecting them to do something nasty; and then they would do it. Mummy said that one night she came into my room to say “Good night” and when she put her hand near the light switch, a scorpion was waiting there to bite her… sting her, really; because a scorpion has a sting on his tail and he stings you with it. I think scorpions just wait around to be nasty. They wait in chapals. And they wait on walls. Mummy said that that’s all they do… just wait around to be nasty. And then they sting you and you die. Just like that.

Scorpions and snakes. Snakes never cross coir matting because the coir tickles their tummies or it hurts their tummies. That’s why there are coir mats in bedrooms… to stop the snakes.

“Snakes never cross coir matting,” Mrs Taylor had told my mother when we first went to live in the Cantonment. Mrs Taylor was Binkie Taylor’s mother. Everybody said that Binkie Taylor was my girlfriend. I didn’t know that, and I don’t think Binkie Taylor knew it either. Mrs Taylor and Colonel Taylor lived at the other end of the Cantonment.

We went there some days to visit them. It was always on a Sunday that we went, but not a lot; and sometimes there were some of the Low-down-types there. Mummy and Daddy called them the Low-down-types, but they were my friends.

One of the Low-down-types was called Chalky White and there was Nobby Clark and there were some others and there was a man who could draw such lovely pictures and I went to the Depot once and he showed me.

The Low-down-types came for lunch in out bungalow on Sundays, and that was the best time… well, almost the best time. The Low-down-types were officers too, like Daddy. Only Daddy was more important, I think. They called him Sir and laughed when he told jokes and silly stories.

When we went to visit people; important people like Colonel Taylor and Mrs Taylor, or sometimes not so important people, we would walk right up, almost to the veranda of the house from our tanga, or whatever had brought us there, and then Daddy would call out: “Koi hai?”. We didn’t knock on the door, Daddy called out “Koi hai?” in a big voice.

That meant, “Is there anyone there?”

Then their bearer would come running down the steps and come and say to Daddy, “Colonel Taylor Sahib is at home, Sahib”. And if he knew Daddy he would call him, “Major Sahib,” or perhaps he could read it on Daddy’s shoulders because Daddy would be in uniform and he had gold stars on his shoulders… “and the Star of India falling from a Sky of Blood into a Sea of Blue Ink”. My Daddy told me that so I would remember.

Very grand people went to Mrs Taylor and Colonel Taylor’s bungalow. There was a Very Important Lady once who was there when I went with Mummy and Daddy. She sat in the big chair Colonel Taylor usually sat in and when she said something, everybody laughed. Some of the things she said were very silly, but everybody laughed anyway.

All the men were standing, and they laughed a lot. When the Very Important Lady saw me, she told me to come and talk to her. She was very old, but she looked very pretty. I thought she was much nicer than Mrs Taylor.

She pointed to the floor in front of her chair, and said,

“Come and talk to me, little man”. So I did. She smelt just like the frangipani that our Mali had growing at the front of our bungalow. I liked that smell. Frangipani smelt so lovely, but when you touched the branches it started to bleed white stuff like sort of blood for trees, and then your hands got sticky and Mali would look sad and say, “Chota Sahib, don’t touch… very dirty, Chota Sahib”. And I would look at my hands and the white stuff from the branches would have turned black and dirty and Mummy would have to scrub my fingers with a wet flannel and be a little bit cross.

Or sometimes Krishna would say, “I’ll do it Memsahib,” and he would say to me, “Come along Chota Sahib, bad, bad fingers” and he would wipe my fingers with the wet flannel, but it didn’t hurt at all; I really loved Krishna.

And the Very Important Lady looked at me very hard and she said,

“My, but you have such blue eyes”, and she touched my cheek with the back of hand, “Where did you get those lovely blue eyes?”

“From the blue, blue Mediterranean Sea,” I said, because my Mummy used to laugh when I said it. And my Mummy told lots of people that I said it all by myself; and she didn’t know where I got it from.

Then everybody laughed again, but the Very Important Lady looked at her hands and then I saw that she was crying a little bit and after that everybody looked like grownups look when somebody has said something that they shouldn’t…

I liked that Lady. I didn’t see her again, but I liked her because she smelt so nice and because she cried a little bit. Sometimes, years later when I would be walking by myself, I would smell that lovely smell and it would make me go all the way back to Dehu Road and to the Cantonment and I would remember that day, and I would remember.

I would remember the Lady who smelt like the frangipani; how she cried just a little bit; and I would remember Krishna and the chapals and the toothpaste, and I would find that I wanted to cry also.

I still do.

Krishna (on the left) Khansama and me

Source

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Comments 43 comments

KKalmes profile image

KKalmes 5 years ago from Chicago, Illinois

My dear Ian, I am afraid I have found a friend in you that I will cherish always and that is so out of character for me that I think I might cry a bit as well!

Thank you!

I want to hear and know more...


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Kevin, Thank you so much... on very many levels. It's amazing, isn't it, that something so simple as a language, and a love of that language, can create ties and friendships.

Thank you also for taking the time for all the myriad things you do.

Ian


Candie V profile image

Candie V 5 years ago from Whereever there's wolves!! And Bikers!! Cummon Flash, We need an adventure!

Did you ever find out what made the lady so special in your circle? What ever happened to the little girl?

I loved this! So much richness to memories like this, to relationships formed for someone so young. This was a real treat!


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Thank you, Candie. i don't know what happened to a lot of characters in the story. This was India from about 1946 to 1948. The British were kicked out in 1947, after Partition... My family and I were still there at the beginning of 1948. Dreadful times for the Hindus and Muslims who were on the wrong sides of the borders of Pakistan and India.

This is the country of my birth, and so I write about it with such love and affection, and shame at what the British, under the Viceroy Mountbatten, did to that country.


H P Roychoudhury profile image

H P Roychoudhury 5 years ago from Guwahati, India

It was a lovely story of past memory. Apart from the Lovely Lady, I like the voice of Krishna ““Sahib! Sahib! Chota Sahib!”. . . Chota Sahib is now a real ‘Bora Sahib’ living in U.K. - Lovely and interesting.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Thank you my friend. This Burra Sahib is also a Gora Sahib, but loves his homeland. I wonder if I will ever return. Thank you for reading it and enjoying it too.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis

As always, exemplary. I especially like the way the boy judges someone to be important by the fact that everyone laughs at what they say, "silly" though it may be. That is exactly what happens, and how perfect for a child to notice it and draw this (correct) conclusion.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Thanks for reading it Chris. You really do get to the nub of my stuff, don't you. I have waited with bated breath for your comments. It was quite liberating writing in the first person singular, but as a child.


donna bamford profile image

donna bamford 5 years ago from Canada

I too loved this and all the memories of india it brought back to brought back to me though I was only there for four months. i too was on a compound - a missionary compound in Rajasthan where my aunt taught

nursing for 30 years, i do not remamber being afraid of scorpions though I was terribly afraid of snakes. A very interesting piece Twilight. I should like to hear more and about Australia and Italy and all your adventures. Well done.


donna bamford profile image

donna bamford 5 years ago from Canada

I too loved this and all the memories of india it brought back to brought back to me though I was only there for four months. i too was on a compoud - a missionary compound in Rajasthan where my aunt taught

nursing for 30 years, i do not remamber being afraid of scorpions though I was terribly afraid of snakes. A very interesting piece Twilight. I should like to hear more and about Australia and Italy and all your adventures. Well done.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Thank you, Donna. As you have no doubt realised, I feel so ambivalence concerning my background(s), but have an inordinate love of the sub Continent and my too brief time there. Australia was very important to me, and I adore Italy, but there is so much inside me; jostling to come out.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

I hope the jostling brings it to the surface, Ian. It deserves to come out.

I loved this. I'm familiar with scorpions and snakes. Been stung by scorpions a few times and surprised by a rattlesnake.

One evening at the ranch George went to the water well derrick and found the concrete pad around the pump's pipe into the ground covered with hundreds of newborn scorpions. I wish I'd had a camera. It was a dreadful but amazing sight to behold!


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

How beautiful. Scorpions are such jewels of animals. Rattlesnakes, on the other hand, are not the most elegant animals at all. I have never seen one in the flesh, but there is something too stubby and... I don't know. I just don't like them.

I remember that we had a cat in Australia who used to bring scorpions in frequently. I don't know if they were as dangerous as the ones in India, but that cat wasn't so large anyhow. I had forgotten all about it until just now. HP has something going for it, I suppose!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

Actually of the poisonous snakes in North America - and there are only four species that are - rattlesnakes are the most polite.They are not aggressive and they warn before they strike.. But all in all, snakes are not my favorite creatures. The smaller they are, the more potent their venom, too. Copperheads are quite aggressive and will seek and chase a person. Water moccasins are sneaky and coral snakes are the most deadly.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

Are you a Scorpio, by any chance?


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

I know what you mean about the size of snakes and their venom in relation to their size. i have a story bubbling in my mind which I will most probably entitle 'Snake'. It is a strange tale involving snakes (naturally) and coincidence.

Your "Copperheads are quite aggressive and will seek and chase a person2 has already made food for nightmares. I think that, generally, snakes are so beautiful, but the people who keep them in tanks are almost subhuman in themselves.

Maybe not in the USA, but certainly here.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

No, Nellie. I am the quintessential Libra. Obsessed with balance, artistic, made for the judiciary or the arts... a good teacher... and a thoroughly wonderful person to boot.

I do not believe in horoscopes or predictions, but I do believe that many people can exhibit characteristics associated with their sign.

And what are you?


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Thank you Shuvo for reading it and gleaning what you did from the segment. I am aware that scorpions and snakes are not aggressive and that they "just happen" to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, and sting or bite as a protective mechanism. But little boys have to believe what they are told, and no matter what I write, there is a skein of "nothing as as it may appear" going through it. Maybe Chota Sahib never grew up into a complete Burra Sahib, and still lives in those days.

Thank you also for saying you loved it.

Hanifa loved it... Hmm!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

I don't believe in horoscopes and astrological predictions either but it is uncanny how often the characteristics of the sun sign are exhibited and if the other signs of a person's "planets" and their relationships are taken into account, it is really uncanny how closely the picture fits the person.

I am Aquarius, with a Sagittarius moon, Gemini rising, Capricorn Mercury, Pisces Mars, Aquarius Venus, Leo Jupiter and some other Capricorn influences which account for the ponderous cap on my other signs, but which also gives me stability I would surely lack big-time otherwise.

Libra is an affiliated sign with both Aquarius and Gemini, all being "air" signs - which are the intellectual group. Gemini is the most verbal and expressive. Libra, the most fair-minded, balanced and artistic, as you point out, and Aquarius is the most futuristic & humanitarian - and also the most "fixed" of the air signs. (translates: stubborn, though I stubbornly deny that!)

My first husband was a junior high general science teacher. All the sciences were touched upon in his lessons, including herpetology. He had science-focused friends - a married couple - who WERE practicing herpetologists. In fact these folk had my two children wanting to handle poisonous snakes! We visited them once. They lived in a very small mobile home and there were cages with poisonous snakes EVERYWHERE. Well, let me tell you - when you are being eyed by a bunch of young rattlesnakes when you are using the bathroom, you do not linger. That was among my most vividly uncomfortable moments.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

That has made my spine go into mini spasm. As I said, I think they are beautiful animals, but "in their place".

I can't imagine why God chose the serpent to persuade Whatsername to eat whatever it was when she went on that picnic with Whatsisname. There must have been a much more persuasive and believable animal who would be willing to do it for the Almighty. Felis Domesticus, perhaps; they're always up for something insidious.


Lady Wordsmith profile image

Lady Wordsmith 5 years ago from Lancaster, UK

I have done a little cry at your beautiful memories :)

I love this hub, so very much, that I am going to bookmark it. I hope that you will feel able to share some more of your memories with us one day. I love your voice in this story, the child that you are (still?). The fact that you treasure these memories so dearly is very apparent. And my attention was rapt immediately, especially when I read ' his dry feet moved over the dry floor' - descriptions like this just thrill me to my core, they really do put us in a place and a time, where we can hear and see very clearly.

Beautiful, my friend. I hope to read more. If you wrote a book of these memories, I would definitely buy it.

Linda.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Thank you, Linda. Yes, I am still a child in many ways with all the mood swings of a child; with the highs and the lows of a child. They were dramatic times and I am so lucky to be blessed (?) with instant recall. I can remember colours and textures, but I can also empathise quite well, so there will be slips from personal history and pure empathy. I hope you don't see the joins.

A great friend of mine who is a "REAL GROWNUP WRITER" made almost the same remarks when she read Krishna in the Morning'.

Thank you for your encouragement.


Lady Wordsmith profile image

Lady Wordsmith 5 years ago from Lancaster, UK

I will keep encouraging, because I want to read more - it's a kind of encouragement that comes from a selfish place in my heart really ;)

You know a real grownup writer??! Wow! I've never met a real grownup writer. I'd probably say stupid things and make myself look an idiot, and that grownup writer would not want to be friends with me!

Linda.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

My oldest friend (Oldest because I have known her since I was about eighteen) I fell in love with, went to college with; went to Teachers' College with; entered writing competitions with (we both won the first prizes) is now a highly respected writer on Women's Issues and Islamic Issues. Hanifa Deen

http://www.hanifadeen.com/


Lady Wordsmith profile image

Lady Wordsmith 5 years ago from Lancaster, UK

Oh, I say. A real proper writer is your very good friend! How lovely. Her name is actually very familiar to me, and I'm not sure why. I think someone might have recommended her writing to me. I'm going to add her to my list of writers to read, because her books sound very much like something I would enjoy. Thanks for this :)

Linda.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

'Read Caravanserai', or even better, 'Broken Bangles'. You will break your heart when you discover man's inhumanity to woman. Stunning writing. They are not novels, but she has the most amazing knack of letting you see a really warm, intelligent and wonderful person who seems to be writing for you alone.


Lady Wordsmith profile image

Lady Wordsmith 5 years ago from Lancaster, UK

I will, thanks for the recommendation Ian. It's about time I started reading some other than fantasy again :)


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Shuvo. I just read your lovely comment again, It is so beautifully written, and I thank you again, It is so elegant and well worded


SilverGenes 5 years ago

The photo of your family with the Lowdowntypes set the mood for me and it just got better and better. Perhaps it is because your child speaks to mine that I am moved to smiles and tears as I read. The comments add even more :)


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Would you think me arrogant to admit that I sat back in my chair and smiled at your elegant and eloquent comment?

What else can I do? I feel I have touched a kindred soul... I think you understand me very well.

Thank you.


SilverGenes 5 years ago

You have indeed touched me! And I thank you for the opportunity to know you through your words.


attemptedhumour profile image

attemptedhumour 5 years ago from Australia

The great thing about hubpages is that we can be taken on unexpected journeys to who knows where and be given a glimpse of a world that is so foreign to us. The low down types was such a rich addition to an already colourful tale and your characters were bristling with warmth and charm. Today it was the colonel's choice, but the low down types can also play a tune or two, without prejudice. Brilliant Ian.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

I have to remember when I get tired of HubPages that there is a "family" atmosphere about it and a getting under the skin of others in this great and beautiful planet, which makes it so worth while.

I hope you like what you find... ask Sunnie Day; she found me an irascible old bugger, but she puts up with that.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

I was going to say, "Welcome to my world," Keith, but I realised that you know me and a lot of my world already.

Thank you for the very positive comment, my friend.


attemptedhumour profile image

attemptedhumour 5 years ago from Australia

I Know so little of your world really Ian, bits of it creep through with each interaction but we still don't get a clear idea of one another. I do know that you are an exceptional, witty and intelligent writer, with the good grace to acknowledge others. Without people like you and other like minded hubbers it simply wouldn't be worth the effort of wracking one's brain thinking of something to write about. I write because i enjoy the process, as i'm sure you do too. But writers need readers and you play the game as it should be played, time permitting of course, the scourge for all of us. Commenting is vital to writers who are not chasing dollars, but it is very easy to convey the wrong message. I did a creative writer's course, but commenting wasn't mentioned. It's a free for all where humour in particular can easily be misconstrued.

Most of the things i write are just an excuse for writing humour, but i do have a serious side too. There are mant talented writers on hubpages in all their many forms but your childhood memories of India are as good as anything i have read, simple but complex too and hypnotic to read. Cheers mate.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

What a fabulously heart-warming comment to make, Keith. Sometimes I find that no one reads anything I have written for days and days. and I really get depressed.

I thought I wrote for myself, and I was obviously wrong, or deluding myself. We all feed on success, and I find that when I look and I see that person A or person B has commented on something I have written, my mind frequently skips into another gear. I find myself saying "I hope he/she likes it" about person A and I almost think,. "OK so she/he is going to like it but she/he would like the scribbling of a trained chimp".

There are a precious few who fit into the A category, Keith, and you are one of the, I won;t name the others, as i may miss one out, but I have got to the stage, in many cases, that I am scanning and ignoring. I am too slow a writer to try to qualify or to find something good to write about crap.

I, as you, write because I love writing, but if someone were to tell me that I was writing rubbish, and I thought they were wrong, I would be forced to go and heave a rock through their window (Notice I said "rock" rather than "brick" because you're a real Dinki Di Ausie now).

Ha ha ha!


attemptedhumour profile image

attemptedhumour 5 years ago from Australia

We can be so different in what we write, but we all have something to say in our own way. Hubpages is about give and take, or should be. Cheers.


attemptedhumour profile image

attemptedhumour 5 years ago from Australia

You are a great writer Ian but hubbers don't have enough time to concentrate on all the writers that they have an affinity for. I had a virus a couple of months ago and spent most of the day on hubpages. I could just about keep up with all the hubbers that i try to follow. Now i just don't have as much time so i have to look after the hubbers who have the time or inclination to read my stuff. That's how it is, for me anyway. I'm happy that a small group of hubbers, you being one of them, tune in. You should be happy too, because it could be worse. Cheers mate


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

Just what I wanted to hear, my friend. I was just telling my neighbour, a very intelligent American lady with a love of good writing, all about your work, and here you are.

Cheers mate... er... Cobber!


attemptedhumour profile image

attemptedhumour 5 years ago from Australia

Well that's good of you to mention my silly scribblings. So thanks for that. Yes i am a Cobber, but i write from my English viewpoint. I wouldn't be able to write in an Aussie way as their humour and outlook is different to mine. I'm always trying to think of new things to write about. Hubpages has helped me to be more versatile. I get inspired by what other people write and it seems to rub off. Just when writers block is staring me in the face something comes along to fill the void. I never used to write without a clear idea of what something was about. Now i think of a line or two and just go for it and see where i end up. It's very liberating. Oh well it's past midnight now so i'd best depart. Cheers mate.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

I write like that, Keith. I start writing and sometimes the thing takes on a life of its own and is like a horse with the bit between its teeth. A very old analogy, but it still works.

My sense of humour, like my accent , is an amalgamation of several cultures, but I think it is very West Australian. After all I lived in W.A, for seventeen years.

Back to the story writing. I have had writers' block for the first time in my life, but in two areas. Two longish short stories, which will not come to an and of their own volition, but have dug their heels in and refuse to cooperate. But last night I kick started one of them, and I have written about three hundred words; which is a lot for me, so here's hoping. Unfortunately I will never be able to publish it on HP because it is

1. Too long

2. Somewhat iconoclastic.

Never mind; as I said, I write for myself!!!


Storytellersrus profile image

Storytellersrus 2 years ago from Stepping past clutter

Twi, I have missed an entire side of you. I may have read it in the past, but did not put it together- being a triple Aquarius, I can be somewhat of a frangipani fluff.

I was not aware that you referred to one if your hubs, when you mentioned this Krishna favorite person. I googled what I thought was the title of a book and... Voila! It led me to this sensory place. Thank you.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 2 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K. Author

I hope you like it, Story.

This is an example of the soft underbelly of Hilda Plantagenet-Featheringstonehaugh - that is, if she has a soft underbelly. Which I doubt.

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