Letters Dd and Ee Vocabulary Mistakes that Bedevil English Speakers and Learners

Yes, it's possible to avoid the most common English vocabulary mistakes.
Yes, it's possible to avoid the most common English vocabulary mistakes. | Source

10 Common Vocabulary Errors in Letters Dd and Ee

English vocabulary can be a knotty subject for many learners and some speakers of the English language.

This is because there are so many words in English that seem to mean the same but actually have very fine differences in definitions.

Knowing how and when to use these words does make a lot of positive effects in sentences, which become clear and easily understood when appropriate words are used.

Below is a list of the ten most common vocabulary mistakes that start in letters Dd and Ee and some suggestions on how to avoid them.

1. Descent versus Dissent

Descent means to fall, dive, crash or decline whereas dissent means to differ, dispute or balk.

Example:

Wrong: We do not ever want to be close-minded so we neither discount descent nor take it lightly.

Right: We do not ever want to be close-minded so we neither discount dissent nor take it lightly.

2. Desert versus Dessert

A desert is a very hot and parched region that is often considered either a wasteland or wilderness. A dessert is often a sinful, heavenly, and sweet food that can be eaten on its own or as the last part of a meal.

Example:

Wrong: I think I’m going to order desert. My meal is never complete without one.

Right: I think I’m going to order dessert. My meal is never complete without one.

3. Differ from versus Differ With

Differ from is used to refer to differences of features while differ with is used to refer to differences of opinion. The latter also refers to conflict or misunderstanding.

Example:

Wrong: The latest product version differs with the old one in style and function. Still, I would say that the old version is better.

Right: The latest product version differs from the old one in style and function. Still, I would say that the old version is better.

4. Discreet versus Discrete

Being discreet means being tactful, careful, and cautious not to offend others. Being discrete means being detached or isolated.

Example:

Wrong: Wary of causing a stir, the reality TV show star exited the restaurant discretely.

Right: Wary of causing a stir, the reality TV show star exited the restaurant discreetly.

5. Disinterested versus Uninterested

To be disinterested is to be unbiased, objective, or open-minded. To be uninterested is to be unconcerned or dispassionate.

Example:

Wrong: Public opinion polls show that most of the people think that the verdict was uninterested and that the judge weighed the pieces of evidence thoroughly.

Right: Public opinion polls show that most of the people think that the verdict was disinterested and that the judge weighed the pieces of evidence thoroughly.

6. Each Other versus One Another

Each other is used to point out to two elements while one another is used to point out to more than two elements.

Example:

Wrong: In a lavish and romantic ceremony, the newlyweds vowed to love one another until death.

Right: In a lavish and romantic ceremony, the newlyweds vowed to love each other until death.

7. Elder versus Older

An elder is a noun that refers to a person who is advanced in age while older is an adjective that refers to the long age of something or someone.

Example:

Wrong: We respect our olders and take good care of them. It’s a practice among many of us in our hometown.

Right: We respect our elders and take good care of them. It’s a practice among many of us in our hometown.

8. Eminent versus Imminent

Somebody who is eminent enjoys a good reputation or positive perception. Something that is imminent is about to take place sooner rather than later.

Example:

Wrong: It cannot be helped. The collapse of this economy is eminent.

Right: It cannot be helped. The collapse of this economy is imminent.

9. Especially versus Specially

Especially is used in the same way as particularly. Specially, on the other hand, is used in the same manner as specifically.

Example:

Wrong: This limited-edition watch was especially made for the actress and the lucky 5,000 members of her rabid fan base.

Right: This limited-edition watch was specially made for the actress and the lucky 5,000 members of her rabid fan base.

10. Explicit versus Implicit

Something that is explicit is openly and clearly stated. Something that is implicit is indirectly or obscurely stated.

Example:

Wrong: She said it many vague ways. It’s quite explicit that she wants out.

Right: She said it many vague ways. It’s quite implicit that she wants out.

Copyright © 2011 Kerlyn Bautista

All Rights Reserved

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Comments 4 comments

jfay2011 profile image

jfay2011 5 years ago

very good hub. We all from time to time can't figure out how to spell something. I just downloaded the online dictionary and spell checker. Giving most of my book forms away.


Pikachusif profile image

Pikachusif 5 years ago from Castelia City, Unova

Very nice Hub. English is rather tricky in itself, and I believe that everyone (Who speaks fluent English) must know these rules to make clear speech a reality.


asmaiftikhar profile image

asmaiftikhar 5 years ago from Pakistan

voted up! k as usual an informative and useful hub.


twobmad profile image

twobmad 5 years ago from Myanmar(Burma)

Very well written Sis. I sure need this kind of lesson.

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