Poems to Inspire

Introduction

These poems, in roughly chronological order, are just a few of those I have written over 50 plus years. This particular collection I have classified as "Inspirational" as they have insights into the relationship of people either with each other or with God. As such, you may find that one or more is useful to read in order to make a point in a sermon or in an educational setting. Each one is preceded by its own introduction, saying when and why I wrote it. I hope you will find that they do "what it says on the tin".

Frank Savidge



Restrictive Practices

I wrote this first poem while I was a still a pupil at Leyton County High School for Boys.It was one of two I wrote which were published in the school magazine. Sadly, people can, individually or collectively, sometimes look at situations in a selfish and shortsighted way, rather like the priest and the levite, of whom Jesus spoke in the parable of the good Samaritan.



Three doctors travelled on a train, discussing their profession.

"Where does a doctor's duty end?" That was the burning question,

When, suddenly, there came a crash, the train leapt off the rails.

The doctors were unhurt but heard the other people's wails.

"Quick! Help the injured!", cried the first, as he sprung into action.

"He'll do it, good, that lets me out!" was number two's reaction.

"Will you help me?" he asked the third, Said number three "No fear!

It's my day off and, furthermore, my practice is not here".



I Had a Book

During the 1960s I wrote this Gospel song, giving it a slow rock tune. Then decades later, when I showed it to a young office colleague, who was actually Jewish, he spoke the words as a rap. This was not how I intended it, but it worked and I was glad he took such an interest in it.


I had a book that I found on a shelf.

Each page I read showed me more of myself.

It called me a sinner, helpless and dead,

Spoke about judgement, made me see red.

I had a book that I found on a shelf.

It told me that I couldn't earn for myself

Life everlasting, though I might try;

I was a sinner; I had to die.

I had a book told a story of love.

Its theme was a Saviour Who came from above,

Dying for me; rising again;

Making a way of salvation for men.

I have a book; it contains untold wealth.

It's kept in my pocket and not on the shelf.

I need it; I'll read it - all my life through.

The author's my Father - Is He your Father too?



Landmines

Human relations can sometimes be like a minefield. This poem was inspired by somebody I knew some years ago who kept taking things people said the wrong way and getting upset, in turn upsetting others. If we are inclined to explode too readily we need, with God's help,to turn our emotional thermostats down.


We've heard of hidden landmines

And their power to kill and maim.

Our late Princess Diana campaigned to ban the same.

Evil devices used by man against humanity -

But what about the landmines of our personality?

It's sad when, just by speaking, we walk down a perilous road,

Lest something that we say will cause some person to explode.

It is not honouring to God that our breath must be bated

As, by our words, somebody's mine may well be detonated.

Let's pray that, by God's Spirit, we can make a brand new start,

That He will sweep, de-fuse and clear the mines in every heart.



Sin's Supermarket

We humans have a habit of picking and choosing our own code of conduct, just like choosing the goods we want in a supermarket. In doing so we sometimes set aside the absolutes laid down by God in his Word, the Bible. In the early hours of one morning this poem came to me and I went straight downstairs, turned the computer on, and typed the poem so that I would not forget it.


Sin's like a supermarket that's sumptuously spaced

With shelves and shelves of merchandise, designed for every taste.

There are some shelves we linger at, our baskets fill with glee;

At other shelves we shake our heads quite disapprovingly.

Our baskets get quite chock-a-block with no more space to fill.

We then go to the checkout and queue to pay the bill.

The items are all totted up to ascertain the cost:

A lack of fellowship with God; our peace of mind is lost.

"This is a most expensive place" we mumble to ourselves,

Yet, next time, take a trolley to help unload the shelves.

If we were wise, then we would seek our heavenly Father more

For strength, when tempted, to avoid sin's supermarket door.



Lord I Need a Touch From You

This poem is actually the lyrics of a devotional chorus for which I also wrote a tune. It reflects the fact that I can do nothing of worth without Jesus.


Lord I need a touch from You.

Send your Spirit flooding through.

May your living water flow,

Blessing people that I know.

There is nothing I can do

If I don't abide in you.

Keep me walking in Your way,

Touch me Lord today.




Paradoxes

This poem was inspired by the fact that I knew a couple some years ago who had a personality clash with another couple.The only non-rhyming poem I have so far written, it portrays the fact that "It takes all sorts" as the expression goes and we all, in our diversity, have a valid contribution to make.



Water, vital, indispensable for human life

Yet a grave for many.

Electricity, versatile workhorse of modern times

But to some the cause of death.

The two together a lethal combination;

Relaxing bath in water heated by electricity

Refreshing tea from water boiled by electric kettle.

Extrovert person making many feel welcome

But others importuned.

Introvert, gladly working alone, getting things done

But by whom some feel neglected.

Different shaped pieces of the same jigsaw,

Each having a place no other can fit.

Let us accept one another, that the picture may be complete.



What Do You Mean by the Millennium?

This was a song in a rock 'n roll style that I wrote in 1999 when everybody was talking about the Millennium celebrations (and the dreaded Millennium Bug which did not bite after all). The word has long had a different significance for those who know their Bible from those who just think in worldly terms.



There's a word that people say
And it's used so much today.
It's a word that only Christians used before.
But the meaning's not the same;
It's not linked to that great Name
Of the One who'll do away with crime and war.

Chorus

O Tell me, What do you mean by the Millennium?
Is it just a time for spending and for mirth?
I'll tell you just what I mean by the Millennium;
It's the thousand years when Jesus reigns on earth.

Human government today is just like iron mixed with clay
And the world is full of violence and disease.
But when Jesus comes again, with his saints on earth to reign
He'll do away with suffering and sleaze.

O Tell me, What do you mean by the Millennium?
Is it just a time for spending and for mirth?
I'll tell you just what I mean by the Millennium;
It's the thousand years when Jesus reigns on earth.



My Marie

I wrote this poem in 2004. It is about the woman who became my wife on the 17th of June 2006. I am grateful to the Lord for bringing her into my life, even though the way in which He did it involved pain for her.God moves in a mysterious way His wonders to perform, as the hymn says.


I love to be with my Marie.

She even loves to be with me.

I asked myself how that could be

But realised God sent her to me.

Upon His chessboard she did stand.

Some great manoeuvre He had planned

And moved her with His skilful hand.

Although she couldn't understand

Why things that caused her pain should be,

In retrospect we now can see,

Because of them she came to me.

I thank You Lord for my Marie.



The German Oompah Band

THE GERMAN OOMPAH BAND

This poem describes an actual dream I had while I was sleeping. I really did feel sorry for myself with an abscess on my tooth. I honestly did not recognize the tune during the dream but remembered when I awoke. This realization helped me to put my own pain into perspective.



As I felt sorry for myself,
An abscess on my tooth,
I went to sleep and had a dream.
What follows is the truth.

I dreamed that I was walking through
Some unknown forest land
And came into a village with
A German oompah band.

They sat there in two facing lines
Along the village street,
And played a tune so lively,
Yet so simple and so sweet.

The tune stayed with me when awake;
And brightened up my day.
I later realised what it was;
That I had heard them play.

"Must Jesus bear the cross alone
And all the world go free?
No, there's a cross for everyone
And there's a cross for me".

More by this Author


Comments

No comments yet.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working