Quotations for Motivation #10 --- Success

Quotations on Success

To get to the top, start at the bottom, but be sure the bottom has a top.

---James L. Dow, Lubbock Avalanche, Lubbock, Texas, Dec. 13, 1921.

Do you know the Success family? The father of Success is Work; the mother of Success is Ambition; the oldest son is Common Sense; some of the older boys are Perseverance, Honesty, Thoroughness, Enthusiasm and Cooperation. The oldest daughter is Character. Some of her sisters are Cheerfulness, Loyalty, Courtesy, Care, Economy, Sincerity and Harmony. The baby is Opportunity.

---Milo Atkinson, El Paso Herald, El Paso, Texas, June 22, 1918.

Very few highways that lead to success are hard surfaced. Most of them are full of ruts and rocks, and the man who makes the best progress while traveling them is the man who made sensible preparation before he started out and drives in a conservative manner after having made the start. The person who breaks the speed laws over those highways is very apt to have serious “blow-outs.”

---Carl J.G. Brown, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Feb. 24, 1921.

You’ll never get success if you don’t chase after it. Success won’t walk up to you, throw its arm around you, and bunny hug you. Success doesn’t dance that way.

---Carl J.G. Brown, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Feb. 8, 1922.

Failure is one half ignorance and the other half diffusion. Success is the absolute mastery of the single thing in hand.

---Newell Dwight Hillis, The Citizen, Berea, Ky., Jan. 11, 1906.


Knowledge before action invites success; action before knowledge invites failure.


---E.W. “Ed” Howe, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Feb. 5, 1889.

Success isn’t the process of avoiding battles. It’s the winning of battles.

---Eugene Alexander “Gene” Howe, Amarillo Daily Globe, Amarillo, Texas, May 8, 1924.

On the road to success, some men never get out of the mud holes, however dry the weather.

---Eugene Alexander “Gene” Howe [Methodist], Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Oct. 25, 1923.

If you would make the most of yourself, make it a rule to have nothing to do with inferiority. Do not take chances. Do not allow it in your environment lest it may demoralize your taste and lower your life standard.

---Orison Swett Marden, The Citizen, Berea, Ky., Sept. 14, 1905.

There is something in the very consciousness that we are master of the situation that confronts us, especially if it is difficult, that is a wonderful tonic. The sense of mastery, of victory in what we undertake, is a perpetual uplift to the life. It is a powerful tonic to the ambition, a perpetual stimulus to endeavor. A man feels larger every time he surmounts an obstacle which, perhaps, seemed insurmountable. There is a sense of added power in every victory, a feeling of enlargement at the very thought of overcoming. A feeling of exultation thrills through the whole system when we have conquered, when we have proved ourselves master of the situation. There is an exhilaration which accompanies the sense of victory that makes us long to undertake even harder things.

---Orison Swett Marden, Success Magazine, New York, N.Y., February 1905.

Nothing can hold a man back but his own limitations.

---Elbert Hubbard, quoted in Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Dec. 29, 1909.

Success is a growth. One cannot reach it in a month or in a year. It is a change in the mental attitude, and it cannot come quickly. Success in one small endeavor leads to success in another; success in small things will lead to success in larger things, and no matter what the surroundings are at this time, they can be changed into success.

---John F. Easley, Daily Ardmoreite, Ardmore, Okla., Feb. 10, 1915.

Success is the summit of the Mountain of Hard Work, reached by climbing the Path of Opportunity, which is often blocked by the Boulders of Discouragement, the Gullies of Self-Doubt, and the Precipices of Common Mistakes.

---Hazen Conklin, The Evening World, New York, N.Y., Feb. 19, 1915.

Efficiency is a combination of hard work, high aim, strong purpose, dogged determination, resourcefulness, keen ambition, power of decision, tact, knowledge, mental grasp and a multitude of other things. Easy to be efficient, isn’t it?

---Hazen Conklin, The Evening World, New York, N.Y., Feb. 19, 1915.

Success comes only by working for it—never by shirking for it.

---Hazen Conklin, East Oregonian, Pendleton, Ore., Feb. 16, 1915.

A “winning streak” is seldom any kin to a “lazy streak.”

---Hazen Conklin, East Oregonian, Pendleton, Ore., March 17, 1915.

Lots of us run fast enough, but we never start soon enough.

---Hazen Conklin, East Oregonian, Pendleton, Ore., March 17, 1915.

Some men stand all their lives vainly rattling the doors to success and wondering where those inside got their keys.

---Hazen Conklin, The Evening World, New York, N.Y., Oct. 26, 1914.

A “flood of ideas” hasn’t much value if there’s merely an “ebb” of application.

---Hazen Conklin, The Evening World, New York, N.Y., Oct. 27, 1914.

Well begun is half done, but don’t forget it also half undone.

---Hazen Conklin, The Evening World, New York, N.Y., Jan. 29, 1915.

Don’t accept as your “best” something that you already have done. Past performances win promotion only in so far as they indicate future performance. What you can do should be something infinitely bigger than what you have done, and between them should lie the evidence of what you are doing.

---Belvidere Brooks, The Evening World, New York, N.Y., Dec. 30, 1913.

Don’t forget that if you accomplish a little every day, it will amount to a good deal in a year.

---E.W. “Ed” Howe, Atchison Globe, Atchison, Kan., Dec. 22, 1877.

When I speak of successful men I do not refer to only a few extraordinary ones, but to the millions who live fairly respectable lives. Anyone who is more trouble to his neighborhood and the world than he is worth is a failure; any man able to hold a job, advance a little in the respect of his community, is a success.

---E.W. “Ed” Howe, St. Joseph Gazette, St. Joseph, Mo., Dec. 29, 1929.

When an obstacle gets in your way, don’t waste time and energy complaining about it. If you can’t push it out of your path, get over it, under or around it any way you can—and leave the obstacle behind you. The second obstacle will not appear half as big if you get past the first.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma Farmer, Guthrie, Okla., Aug. 7, 1907.

More people would travel the road to success if it did not require so much climbing.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma Farmer, Guthrie, Okla., March 27, 1907.

The things that come to the man who waits are not nearly so valuable as those that come to the man who hustles right after them.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma Farmer, Guthrie, Okla., Aug. 4, 1909.

Any task a man attacks in a halfhearted manner he may be sure it will not be well done.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma State Capital, Guthrie, Okla., Jan. 28, 1910.

Builders achieve success by laying bricks, not by throwing them.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma State Capital, Guthrie, Okla., June 26, 1910.

Genius is often a determination to make one success out of many failures.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma State Capital, Guthrie, Okla., Sept. 22, 1910.

There is a tollgate about every half mile on the road to success.

---Henry Edward Warner, Richmond Times-Dispatch, Richmond, Va., Aug. 25, 1915.

Even if you have perfect faith in your ultimate success, there is no reason for not trying to do something to deserve it.

---Henry Edward Warner, Richmond Times-Dispatch, Richmond, Va., March 23, 1916.

Many a man has succeeded by letting the other fellow do all the talking.

---Henry Edward Warner, Richmond Times-Dispatch, Richmond, Va., May 12, 1918.

It takes some men longer to begin to commence to start to get ready, than it should take to finish the job.

---Henry Edward Warner, Richmond Times-Dispatch, Richmond, Va., June 19, 1919.

Performance beats promise by ten lengths.

---Henry Edward Warner, Richmond Times-Dispatch, Richmond, Va., April 3, 1921.

Toil is the toll at the gate to success.

---Elijah Powell Brown, Duluth Evening Herald, Duluth, Minn., Dec. 23, 1899.

He man who starts to go nowhere will usually get there.

---Elijah Powell Brown, Duluth Evening Herald, Duluth, Minn., Dec. 23, 1899.

The only real success is the one which incites us to greater effort.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Dec. 23, 1927.

As long as a man attempts the impossible he makes the achievement of the possible easier.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., June 24, 1929.

Success must keep on growing—graves only need not grow.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 18, 1930.

Success is three parts the will to get there and seven parts the conviction that you can make it.

---Robert Quillen, The Daily Star, Long Island City, N.Y., May 5, 1922.

The reason some men never win a great victory is because they waste too much energy feeling good about a small one.

---Robert Quillen, The Daily Star, Long Island City, N.Y., Aug. 4, 1922.

Every man is the architect of his own fortune but as a rule he has trouble making it check with his specifications.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 11, 1931.

Every man is the architect of his own fortune, but destiny draws up the specifications.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., June 4, 1931.

You will never succeed if you are not willing to risk a failure.

---James L. Gordon, Washington Herald, Washington, D.C., April 7, 1917.

The best success is to succeed yourself.

---James L. Gordon, Washington Herald, Washington, D.C., May 19, 1917.

There is a big difference between doing a thing and doing it well.

---T.G. Pasco, The Citizen, Berea, Ky., Nov. 1, 1899.

In climbing the ladder of success, we have to make our own ladder as we climb.

---Ray Griffith, The Evening World, New York, N.Y., Dec. 23, 1918.

Many a man lets his chance of success go by while dreaming of great things instead of doing the little ones at hand.

---L.E. Tupper, The Citizen, Berea, Ky., Oct. 19, 1905.

A pull is all right if it pulls you out of the groove of shiftless ease.

---J. Marvin Nichols, Amsterdam Evening Recorder, Amsterdam, N.Y., Sept. 9, 1931.

It is better to do one thing well than to do a lot of things that are not worth doing.

---Bennett Wilson “B.W.” Peck, Fulton County News, McConnelsburg, Pa., Jan. 15, 1903.

There is no higher efficiency than doing the right thing in the right way.

---B.C. Forbes, Washington Herald, Washington, D.C., Dec. 30, 1922.

Some peope act as if efficiency and competency were the same thing, but the older you get, the more you notice that there’s quite a difference.

---John Merrill Chilcote, St. Joseph News-Press, St. Joseph, Mo., Aug. 4, 1944.

One reason some people don’t run any better in the race of life is that they never have the least idea how far they are from the finish line.

---John Merrill Chilcote, St. Joseph News-Press, St. Joseph, Mo., March 5, 1955.

The fellow who always talks about the past has a present that is slipping and a future that doesn’t hold too much promise.

---John Merrill Chilcote, St. Joseph News-Press, St. Joseph, Mo., Dec. 17, 1955.

One reason some men don’t make a success of themselves is that they’ve spent too much time trying to hide their lack of success.

---John Merrill Chilcote, St. Joseph News-Press, St. Joseph, Mo., Feb. 24, 1967.

A person should never make the mistake of judging his success by comparing it with the success of someone else, for his ability may be greater or less than his neighbor’s and success is measured by ability.

—Wayne Kerr, Y News, Provo, Utah, May 23, 1930.

Real success is to be judged more by how far you've gone, than by how much you've got after you get there.

—Roberta Lyndon, The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., Feb. 11, 1940.

The real test of success is not in what you have done but in what you have become.

—S.A.L. Morgan, Amarillo Daily News, Amarillo, Texas, May 29, 1934.

Success consists simply in making the world in which you live as much better and happier as your opportunity and capacity permit.

—W.A. MacKenzie, Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 27, 1923.

Ambition + Preparation + Determination = Success. Laziness + Anything Else = Failure.

—Harlan Read, Morgan Messenger, Berkeley Springs, W.Va., Jan. 18, 1912.

The man who has done his best has done everything. The man who has done less than his best has done nothing.

—Charles M. Schwab, American Magazine, Springfield, Ohio, November 1916.

Success is the favorable termination of those attempts that aim to benefit permanently the doer and all others affected.

—R.E. Smith, The Shreveport Times, Shreveport, La., Oct. 1, 1928.

No man succeeds who does not always keep his goal ahead of him. No man succeeds who does not exhaust his last possibilities. No man succeeds who does not listen respectfully to any man who can teach him. No man succeeds who does not love success better than its rewards. No man succeeds who does not feel disappointed with his second best. No man succeeds who does not like to face facts.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Jan. 31, 1933.

Don't count too much on the Land of Promise. The Land of Performance is what you want to steer for.

—Frank L. Stanton, The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., April 5, 1913.

In almost every case it is a question of personal development. There are few of us who may not reach the goal of our ambition, but there are mighty few who are willing to pay the price. It's so much easier to stop when the job becomes difficult–and find a lengthy legitimate excuse–one that will be accepted by our friends and be a comfort to ourselves. Those who succeed get there principally because they hang on–hang on when others let go. It isn't because they stay on the job. It's usually in the little things that most men fall down.

—Charles Stelzle, Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, Jan. 25, 1920.

The recipe for success is to mix one part opportunity with nine parts work.

—Jack Warwick, Pittsburgh Post Gazette, Pittsburgh, Pa., Sept. 20, 1935.

The best definition I have ever heard of a man is that he is "Victory Organized."

—Albert Edward Wiggam, Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, Dec. 25, 1927.

Success is merely being ready for our opportunity when it comes. And opportunity is really the master of human destiny. As a man is, so is his strength, and a man is as strong as his character.

—L.D. Young, Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, Feb. 24, 1923.

As necessity is the mother of invention, so follow-up is the mother of thoroughness of execution.

—Samuel O. Bennion, Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah, June 3, 1939.

One of the chief causes of failure is giving up when the task is half finished.

—Phil Conley, The Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Miss., March 2, 1948.

Success depends not on what a man makes, but on what success makes of him.

—Henry F. Cope, Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Ill., Oct. 10, 1909.

If successful–Watch your Step! If unsuccessful–Watch your Instep!

—Frank Irving Fletcher, Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, Oct. 23, 1928.

Only a mediocre performer is always at his best.

—Jack Herbert, Houston Post, Houston, Texas, Jan. 21, 1964.

Brace yourself and knock the "t" off won't.

—B.C. Forbes, Forbes Magazine, New York, N.Y., July 17, 1923.

If you want to make a habit of success, stop studying your mistakes!

—Bernard Haldane, Milwaukee Sentinel, Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 7, 1960.

Doing your best has double value in that it makes for satisfaction and builds in the direction of character and success. Much of the discontent of life, with its restlessness, comes from shirking.

—Frank Francis, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Jan. 21, 1940.

Nothing splendid has ever been achieved except by those who dared believe that something inside of them was superior to circumstances.

—R.B. Moore, San Antonio Register, San Antonio, Texas, Dec. 25, 1931.

He who is satisfied with average success usually falls below the average.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Nov. 29, 1930.

The ladder of success is longer from the bottom up than from the top down.

—Jack Warwick, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh, Pa., May 21, 1937.

The secret of success is not so much in catching on as in holding on after you catch on.

Michigan Farmer, Detroit, Mich., Jan. 1, 1884.

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