Quotations for Motivation #23 --- Defeat (Do Not Be Defeated By Defeats)

Quotations on Defeat

It is the sign of a strong soul not to be defeated by defeat.

---James L. Gordon, Washington Herald, Washington, D.C., March 24, 1917.

No man is beaten until he admits it.

---Orison Swett Marden, Success Magazine, New York, N.Y., August 1906.

No one is defeated until he gives up.

---Orison Swett Marden, Success Magazine, New York, N.Y., September 1906

The man who thinks everything is lost is unconsciously conceding defeat. He has been thwarted in all his ambitions, he has mismanaged, his vision has become twisted, his inclinations have become sinful, and he thinks everything and everybody are as he sees them.

---Carl J.G. Brown, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Feb. 9, 1925.

There is no disgrace in defeat. But the average alibi after defeat is disgraceful.

---Carl J.G. Brown, Amarillo Daily Globe, Amarillo, Texas, March 31, 1924.

Every defeat develops a lot of new excuses.

---Carl J.G. Brown, Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kan., Jan. 17, 1924.

Defeat avoids those who refuse to know it.

---B.C. Forbes, Milwaukee Sentinel, Milwaukee, Wis., Aug. 9, 1929.

Victory comes by design, defeat by default.

—Delbert L. Stapley, Harvester, Victoria, Australia, March 1964.

There is a vast difference between defeat and being the victim of defeatism. To do our work earnestly is to feel a thrill in living.

—John Edward Carver, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Dec. 1, 1942.

It appears to be the natural trend for those who have been passed by in the better things of this world to become saturnine and cynical. The darker phase of misfortune or defeat is when men become critical and the product of the hand or brain is replaced by the moody despair of the tongue. Then the appreciation of others’ toil and accomplishment is lost. In the great theater of life they offer no part save faultfinding comment.

—John Edward Carver, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Nov. 1, 1937.

To a man of pluck, defeat is only an incident, out of which he passes to higher and better things.

—Ernest C. Wareing, Western Christian Advocate, Cincinnati, Ohio, Aug. 4, 1920.

Do not surrender until you are dead sure you are defeated.

—Ernest C. Wareing, Western Christian Advocate, Cincinnati, Ohio, Jan. 7, 1926.

Man was created with a talent for self-recovery–his assurance against ultimate defeat.

—Jack Warwick, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh, Pa., Jan. 22, 1940.

The man who can take the “feat” out of “defeat” frequently puts the “rise” in “surprise.”

---Hazen Conklin, The Evening World, New York, N.Y., Nov.16, 1914.

A defeatist is a guy who needs a kick in the can'ts.

---Diana Herbert, Houston Post, Houston, Texas, Dec. 23, 1951.

When a man is defeated, he makes as disagreeable a noise in explaining it as a mule does when he is lonesome.

---E.W. “Ed” Howe, Youngstown Vindicator, Youngstown, Ohio, April 3, 1912.

Nothing succeeds like success except the bitter defeat that spurs to a higher success.

‑‑‑Nephi Jensen, Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah, March 14, 1928.

Defeat stiffens the backbone if you’re made of the right stuff.

—Les Goates, Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah, Jan. 9, 1939.

A man can be accurately described by what he does after he has met with a disastrous defeat.

---Bert Moses, Lake Charles American Press, Lake Charles, La., May 1, 1945.

No matter what field of battle, whether in war or peace, no matter in what line of activity a person came to take his place, the one victory he must win must be the victory over the “second best” within himself. It is the enemy within which defeats us in life, not the enemy without.

—Grove H. Patterson, Toledo Blade, Toledo, Ohio, March 8, 1944.

Real defeat, real failure, is the failure to start.

—Grove H. Patterson, Toledo Blade, Toledo, Ohio, May 11, 1944.

Defeat does not always come through natural circumstances. It comes through the attitude of defeatism. Men who think they cannot do something rarely do it.

—Grove H. Patterson, Toledo Blade, Toledo, Ohio, July 15, 1944.

Defeat should be nothing but education; it is the first step toward something better.

---Earl Riney, Church Management, Cleveland, Ohio, January 1943.

Defeatist--A man who is sure nothing can be done because he has done nothing.

---Lorrie Brooks, Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, March 10, 1954.

The past was never intended to be the directing force in our lives. The past can teach us many things. It can teach us to avoid mistakes in the future. It can teach us what God is trying to accomplish in the universe. But, it certainly cannot become the guiding or directing force in life without disrupting the present and taking us into a false future. ... Defeat and disaster are certain for the person who lets the past direct the future. For instance, it is ruinous for any person to allow brooding sorrow to be the impelling force of the future. Sorrow is something we must all expect because it is the price of love. The greater the love the greater the sorrow. But, a brooding sorrow which refuses to see beyond the clouds, which withdraws into a shell of coldness and loneliness, is actually a maladjustment to life. Brooding over mistakes is another way of admitting defeat to one's life. Anything which tends to control our thinking and govern over actions in the future, unless it is a reasonable and logical planning of the future based upon the experience of the past, is very apt to be defeating to the hope of the future.

—Eugene M. Frank, The Topeka Daily Capital, Topeka, Kan., Jan. 21, 1952.

The dividing line between success and failure, in the mind of the public, is usually a mild wide. Upon the field in actual measurement it is often less than half an inch, often completely dependent upon a raw turn of luck. Victory and defeat are treated as if they were direct opposites. Frequently there is so little difference that the better man or the better team loses and the final score, as a comparative test, means nothing.

—Grantland Rice, New York Herald Tribune, New York, N.Y., March 22, 1924.

Fear undoubtedly is the greatest of all poisons for any competition. It may be based upon the knowledge that one isn't trained for the test. In that case it is almost unavoidable. But usually it comes from an overextended imagination that looks for defeat and that sees in defeat something akin to disgrace. The best type of confidence accepts the possibility of defeat in advance, but refuses to be crushed or depressed by any such shadow. No defeat is final, after all. Frequently it is a better stepping stone than some temporary success.

—Grantland Rice, New York Tribune, New York, N.Y., Aug. 24, 1922.

"What," asks a reader, "is the most useful ingredient in sport–speed, power, courage or brain?' None of them. The most useful ingredient is a philosophy that can take the break of the game as it comes–and can accept failure without depression and success without conceit.

—Grantland Rice, New York Tribune, New York, N.Y., May 4, 1915.

Fear of defeat has been one of the big barriers to many an advancing competitor. As a nation we have in many ways overstressed the importance of victory and the sting of defeat. There are many times when the line between the two is a mere matter of luck--too thin to be charted. There is more of a thrill and a training aid in losing a tough battle in a hard fight than there is in bowling over a set-up. Defeat is an unimportant item where one has contributed 100 percent of what he had to give. Some time ago we were talking to one of the greatest competitors this country ever knew. "I get a lot more fun," he said, "out of defeat in a hard, close contest than I do out of winning a one-sided match where an opponent is outclassed." Few find any sting in defeat where they can figure they have played their game. And few can find any thrill in winning where they know they have played badly. "The will to win" is not as good a slogan as "the will to keep on doing your stuff, regardless of the score." Some of the gamest exhibitions we have ever seen were in the face of certain defeat. Some defeats are far greater achievements than certain victories.

—Grantland Rice, New York Herald Tribune, New York, N.Y., March 4, 1925.

It may sound like so much hokum, but a certain amount of defeat is almost necessary in building up a competitor. The winning road, at the start, is the easy road, and therefore the softening road. The finest steel calls for a world of hammering.

—Grantland Rice, New York Herald Tribune, New York, N.Y., March 10, 1925.

There is little fun in winning where one has played badly, and there can be a large slice of fun in defeat where one has played well, even better than he expected to play. The dividing line between victory and defeat is quite often as thin as a silk thread–and quite often a matter of luck, the break of the game. So there are times when the importance of victory can be overplayed. The good loser is one who accepts the verdict–and begins to get ready for another battle without curling up because he happened to take a flop.

—Grantland Rice, New York Herald Tribune, New York, N.Y., March 27, 1925.

Defeat is not bitter if you do not swallow it.

—Earl Riney, Church Management, Cleveland, Ohio, September 1941.

We learn and grow by defeat as well as by victory, and we must learn to accept and benefit by both. In defeat comes the challenge to improve, to grow and rise above our weaknesses. The true battle in life is not to rise above your fellowmen, but to be a champion of yourself. Your hardest opponent in life will be yourself and your own weaknesses. Anyone who can conquer himself will learn to love and respect others despite their imperfections. He will possess the personal discipline and strength for the many challenges life has to offer.

—Clarence F. Robison, Millennial Star, London, England, May 1964.

Two important facts of life stand out boldly. One is that defeat in some form inevitably overtakes each of us, at one time or another. The other is that every adversely brings the seed of an equivalent benefits, often in some hidden form. From analysis of these facts it is not difficult to recognize that the Creator intends man to gain strength, understanding and wisdom through struggle. Adversity and defeat cause man to develop his wits and go forward. It is often difficult for us to recognize the potentiality of an equivalent benefit in our adversities while we are still suffering from the wounds. But TIME, the greatest of all healers, will disclose them to those who sincerely search for and BELIEVE they will find them.

—Napoleon Hill, Houston Post, Houston, Texas, May 12, 1956.

Every plan and every purpose in life carries with it the possibility of defeat somewhere along the line. The important thing is to learn that defeat does not mean failure, unless you accept it as such. This means we are never defeated by other persons or by unfortunate circumstances. We defeat ourselves, unless we learn to rise above adversity. Many people who have reached high success express gratitude for the defeats they met on the way up. These defeats provide a "testing time" which helped them gain self-confidence. They learned that they possessed a power that was limitless and which could overcome any of the causes of defeat. The turning point in the lives of very successful people often comes after some unpleasant experience which turns them into new paths of opportunity.

When Benjamin Franklin was a young man he went to Philadelphia looking for a job. As he walked down the street munching a loaf of bread, a pretty young woman was so amused at his appearance that she pointed her finger at him and laughed heartily. Her bad manners paid off handsomely for Franklin, for he stopped and introduced himself to her so politely and she became ashamed of her conduct and apologized. She later became Franklin's wife, and his major source of inspiration while he was struggling to gain a place for himself. Asked why he married a woman who treated him so rudely, Franklin replied that he had made up his mind to "tame" her and see if he could influence her to direct her charming personality to something better than making fun of strangers.

Benjamin Franklin became great because, in addition to his many other fine traits and sound judgment, he learned how to look for that seed of an equivalent benefit that comes with every unpleasant circumstance. ... The main thing is to recognize that every adversity and every defeat carries with it the seed of an equivalent or even a greater benefit. Once you get a firm grip on this truth you will learn very quickly how to turn stumbling blocks into stepping stones. And you will learn also one of the greatest of all the ways to convert a negative mental attitude into a positive state of mind. Perhaps more important still, you will discover, as every successful person must, that every experience that comes your way, whether it be pleasant or unpleasant, can be of service to you in carrying out your mission in life. When you make this discovery you will never again accept temporary defeat or failure as anything more than a challenge by which you can test the confidence you have in yourself, the faith you have in your Creator.

—Napoleon Hill, Houston Post, Houston, Texas, Aug. 29, 1956.

You have heard about the chap who went ahead and did the job that people said “couldn’t be done—but he did it.” How can a man be defeated who doesn’t know what the term means? What are you going to do with a man who has a set purpose and refuses to give it up? If you are wise you will stand on the sidelines and learn a lesson from a heroic human being. Don’t let anyone tell you that you are “through.” No man is through until he dies and then often like John Brown’s body, “his soul goes marching on!” The best antidote for discouragement and self-pity is to challenge yourself, and do something that surpasses anything that you have done before—and then start all over again and surpass that! It is much more difficult to fail than it is to succeed. Every little success is a boost for every element that enters into it whereas failure demands all that you have got—and when you have thus surrendered you have no resources life. Not even a cane to leap upon. We all need a coach to the soul these days, and if we would but know it, that coach silently awaits our call within our own mind and heart!

---George Matthew Adams, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., Nov. 7, 1939.

Defeatism is the most devastating disease in all this world. It is a disease that not only takes hold on the body but also one that eats into and attacks with deadly effect the human soul. But this isn’t a disease that medicine or doctors can do anything about. It’s a personal affliction, harbored, nurtured, and created by the one who suffers with it. Therefore, its only hope of cure lies within the desire of the one who has it to get rid of it. Every one of us is bequeathed, in some form or another, a certain philosophy of life. You can discover it somewhere within you, but often it has to be pieced together, like a puzzle. And because of the trouble that such a task involves, many never pay any attention to this opportunity, and therefore go through life in a wandering, confused sort of way. People like this are easy prey for the disease of defeatism. There is plenty of defeatism in the world today. It is the favorite distributing germ of those who would poison the life-force of freedom. But defeatism is such an easy disease of which to get rid. All you have to do is to decide that you will have none of it—in no shape, manner or style! There is always hope in the heart when there is not a shadow of defeat that touches it. And there is hope in the nation that will have nothing of it.

---George Matthew Adams, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., March 6, 1942.

Do not be cast down by defeat. Defeat may be your best friend. In the first place, you may be heading the wrong way. Do you recall the instance of the chap playing in a great football game, who when he obtained possession of the ball, got turned around and ran the wrong way—ran toward the goal of the opposing side? If somebody could have stopped him, it would have been a good thing for him. He would have thought it a bad thing. He would have felt that opportunity had given him a raw deal. If he had stubbed his toe and fallen down, he would have been tremendously chagrined. As it was, he was not stopped. It was impossible to stop him. So with the best intentions in the world, he made a touchdown for the other side. Defeat for that chap would have been a blessing. It if had come early enough, he might have got turned around and started the right way and made a touchdown for his own side. Again, defeat may be good medicine for our souls even when we are going in the right direction. Too much success at one time is a hard thing for the average human being to live down and rise above. We human beings, even when our motives are the best, are a cocky, conceited lot; we are much given to that disease called the swelled head. Prolonged success is bad for the best of us. We need to be taken down about every so often in order that we may be kept at the foot of the cross and continued of use to the forces for righteousness. The trouble with us is that we are apt to take defeat too seriously. We launch into something full of pep and high purposes; our plans go wrong or we think they go wrong; at least they do not go the way we want them to go; then we are cast down; too often we are whipped. A man who cannot take defeat with good grace might as well not start anything anywhere, anytime, for as sure as tight shoes make corns and crooked politics make high taxes, he will sooner or later meet defeat. If he cannot take a licking now and then, and still find himself going strong, he might as well never start, for he is whipped before he starts. Nobody can hope to undertake anything and not be defeated occasionally—probably over and over again. One of the big things that the victor has to learn is to be defeated again and again, is to be able to take it on the chin again and again, and to come back for more again and again. A man I used to know very well, and who was already ready with his fists, but who had the record of never having been whipped, confided to me this interesting and valuable bit of philosophy: “I have been licked many a time, but the other fellow didn’t know it. I just kept right on fighting after I was licked until I had the other fellow licked.” Remember this: If you can be defeated, you will be defeated; if you cannot be defeated, you will not be defeated. Do not be cast down or even worried by defeat; probably you need it in your business of making a success. A man said of another: “He is like a bubbling spring coming up through the sand—plug him up at one place, and he will come up at another.” Be a bubbling spring of sweet pure water, and you are the berries.

---Wickes Wamboldt, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., July 7, 1934.

Wherein does defeat lie? Is it in the simple fact that one man has proved himself stronger, or cleverer, or luckier than another in a contest? Is there any stigma attaching to the man who is the weaker bodily or mentally, or who is less a favorite of fortune than his opponent? Or does the real disgrace of defeat lie in acceptance of a beating without an effort to renew the struggle? The latter, it seems to us, is the more accurate definition. As long as a man is unwilling to accept defeat, defeat can never get possession of him. He may be worsted in encounters of various kinds, but if he is made of the “right stuff” he will always be ready for the battle again with undiminished hopes. This is something we should all keep in mind when making ready for the struggle with the world, where it is to be “each man for himself.” The man who goes forth to the battle of life with the idea that he is going to get along without once meeting with a reverse is a fool. There is no one, be he never so strong or resourceful, who has not, at some time of other, had to yield the palm of victory to an adversary. But he who is willing to meet defeat face to face, to use his reverses as a means to help him to victory in the future, can never be conquered. Though he may come off second best in every contest he enters upon except the last, in that final one he will inevitably be the winner.

---McGill Daily, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, March 7, 1918.

You are never defeated until you acknowledge it.

—Bert Moses, Lake Charles American Press, Lake Charles, La., May 27, 1942.

Worse than defeat is the willingness to accept defeat.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., July 17, 1933.

Next to defeat is the habit of entertaining a fear.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., June 19, 1934.

At the bottom of most defeat is a lack of self-mastery.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., May 14, 1935.

What we call a defeat is sometimes a disguised opportunity.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Nov. 26, 1935.

If you are merely hoping for achievement you are defeated already.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Sept. 23, 1937.

One who cannot stand defeat will never endure victory well, either.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Dec. 2, 1938.

If we remember our defeats nothing can make us conquerors.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Dec. 21, 1933.

The habit of defeat begins with carelessness.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., May 24, 1935.

The true source of discontent is the feeling of defeat.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., June 28, 1935.

The worst of all defeats is to be defeated because we didn't fight.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Sept. 5, 1935.

Defeat is a school in which every man is enrolled at some time.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Nov. 2, 1935.

What we call a defeat is sometimes a disguised opportunity.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Nov. 26, 1935.

Fear is the beginning of defeat.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., April 2, 1936.

He who never admits defeat is always a little closer to victory.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., June 21, 1938.

Despair is the logic of the defeated.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Dec. 6, 1938.

A man who can laugh at defeat is well on the road to success again.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Dec. 14, 1938.

The saddest failures are those who have defeated themselves.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., March 6, 1940.

One thing which defeats most of us is the impulse we act on without thinking.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., April 3, 1941.

Defeat should never be accepted as final if it is incurred in a good cause.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., July 22, 1941.

Defeat should never be allowed to get away without teaching its lesson.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., July 22, 1941.

Defeat should never be a source of discouragement for the man who believes in himself.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., July 22, 1941.

Defeat should never be a cause for deserting justice and truth.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., July 22, 1941.

The advertising of our defeats paves the way for new ones.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., July 16, 1942.

The lessons we learn from defeat may be the admission price of success.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., July 31, 1941.

Defeat is no dishonor—failure to renew the attack is dishonor.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 1, 1928.

Defeat is fate’s way of daring us to go on with the fight.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 1, 1928.

Defeat is an alarm clock calling upon you to get up and go at it.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 1, 1928.

Defeat is fatal to an egotist—it is only an incident to a courageous man.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 1, 1928.

The man who surrenders to his critics will always be in the midst of defeat.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Dec. 20, 1928.

There is compensation in every defeat if we compel it to yield up to its lesson.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 8, 1929.

To have lived without defeats is to have lived satisfied with small victories.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 16, 1929.

If you are big enough to face defeat bravely you can be trusted with a victory.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., June 25, 1930.

Nothing under the sun ever defeats the man who always renews the battle.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 5, 1930.

Expect to be beaten occasionally, but never admit that you are permanently defeated.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 24, 1930.

You cannot think in terms of defeat and hope in terms of victory.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 28, 1931.

It is better to suffer defeat than to share in dishonor.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 9, 1931.

There is a profound difference between defeat and absolute failure.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 2, 1931.

They are never beaten who refuse to admit their defeats.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Dec. 1, 1931.

There is no way of defeating the man who honestly believes in himself.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Jan. 12, 1932.

The beginning of defeat is to lose faith in one’s self.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., June 9, 1932.

Many people spend more time lamenting their defeats than would be necessary to win victories.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 18, 1932.

Nothing can defeat a man so quickly as his own ungoverned passions.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., April 7, 1933.

Nothing can defeat the man who does not know when he is whipped.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., April 7, 1933.

How wretched is that man whose defeats have never instructed him.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., June 20, 1933.

Men take more pains to defend their defeats than to win their victories.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 26, 1933.

Better to be defeated in trying than to be convicted of loafing.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 20, 1933.

Great souls are never discouraged by defeats.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Jan. 26, 1934.

The only way to meet defeat is to meet it with the chin thrust forward.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Jan. 14, 1935.

This world belongs to those who can laugh at today’s defeat because of today’s faith.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Dec. 30, 1935.

That which makes life a triumph is our unwillingness to accept defeat as final.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Jan. 13, 1936.

The man who wins is the one who knows the difference between a temporary victory and a permanent defeat.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 7, 1937.

Hold to your task. Never let it defeat you. Believe in yourself. Continue to hold the confidence of those who confide in you, and battle on. Don’t attempt to carry too many of the worries of the world. Don’t lose faith in humankind. Make whatever be your calling an honorable calling. Keep laughter in your heart and a smile on your face. Remain young and ever hopeful.

—Frank Francis, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Dec. 30, 1928.

A boy in the game of football early learns that he must go in with all his heart to win. In the game of life that is essential. To do anything other than intensely is to invite defeat. To approach a duty with dragging feet and spirits low is to discover the meaning of drudgery. Time flies when the mind is fascinated with its task, when imagination begins to grip you. Make play of your task and your task becomes pleasurable, and the hours and your feet never drag.

—Frank Francis, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Nov. 25, 1925.

No man is defeated until he ceases to struggle to lift himself above obscurity.

—Frank Francis, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Dec. 11, 1926.

The courage to accept whatever difficulty confronts one with a firm determination to conquer makes life livable. No one is defeated so long as there is left the heart to refuse to be defeated.

—Frank Francis, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Oct. 22, 1927.

Everyone should acknowledge that life is a battle in which one must not concede defeat. If things are not going well, fight it out. If disappointments come, resolve to triumph over whatever is adverse. Go on! Struggle on! But, whatever you do, do not live too much in the past. Much of our sadness is impatience. The blues overwhelm when the present seems too large. For the blues, find a hobby and indulge in the building of castles in the air. Then proceed to do a kind act each day. Think of the bright side of existence and stop trying to cross bridges before you get to them.

—Frank Francis, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Nov. 6, 1927.

So long as one fails to concede complete defeat, there is no defeat. When one has done his best and is prepared to go on undismayed, ultimate victory is a possibility.

—Frank Francis, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Nov. 9, 1927.

Those who are defeated must accept the defeat in good spirit as though they recognize no complete defeat while hope survives. No man who aspires high is defeated so long as he continues to have high aspirations and justifies them by giving to the world the best that is in him.

—Frank Francis, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Aug. 16, 1928.

One should train himself to receive reverses in a spirit of proper humility. And one defeat should not be accepted as a complete defeat. Whatever your lot, go on. Do not whimper or whine. Have the courage to fight.

—Frank Francis, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Nov. 30, 1928.

Hold to your task. Never let it defeat you. Believe in yourself. Continue to hold the confidence of those who confide in you, and battle on. Don’t attempt to carry too many of the worries of the world. Don’t lose faith in humankind. Make whatever be your calling an honorable calling. Keep laughter in your heart and a smile on your face. Remain young and ever hopeful.

—Frank Francis, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Dec. 30, 1928.

Being defeated is not a serious setback for those who cannot endure defeat. There is victory in a defeat which is accomplished by a resolve to win a final triumph. If adversity is good in that it stimulates and stirs within us a determination to succeed, then one or two defeats can do no harm and may prove to be beneficial.

—Frank Francis, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Nov. 5, 1930.

Fall in love with life’s opportunities. Train yourself to find good in everything. Make your ambition a great adventure. Don’t get down on your luck, for there is no such thing as luck. There may be closed doors, but, confronted with them, cause them to open, or turn to other portals which invite you to enter. Never allow yourself to be defeated. That is to say, do not confess defeat. A victory cannot be won by a sense of inferiority. Refuse to admit defeat. In the aggression is to be found the way to complete triumph. That means one must believe in himself and must fight to succeed.

—Frank Francis, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, March 24, 1931.

Morale is nothing more than what you think. If you are filled with unnerving apprehensions, if you think defeat, you are doomed to defeat. What you think, you are. If you are unconquerable, even in the face of great difficulties, a degree of success will be attained. If you are dejected, then your mind will affect your heart, and your nerves will be jangled.

—Frank Francis, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, March 26, 1932.

No man is ever defeated until he gives up.

---Zion's Herald, Boston, Mass., May 8, 1901.

A man who is afraid of defeat admits failure.

---Chinook Opinion, Chinook, Mont., Nov. 20, 1958.

Court defeat and marry failure.

---Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, Aug. 14, 1906.

There is no defeat except for those who accept defeat.

---Meriden Record, Meriden, Conn., Aug. 6, 1929.

We say we are defeated, as though by an outside adversary. The truth is that we are mostly self-defeated.

---Utah Farmer, Salt Lake City, Utah, June 25, 1935.

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