Quotations for Motivation #25 --- Dedication & Devotion

Quotations on Dedication & Devotion

There are plenty of people to say things can’t be worse; let’s dedicate ourselves to making things better.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 6, 1930.

Greatness is nothing if it cannot be dedicated to a worthy cause.


---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 23, 1932.


There is no record of any man who devoted his life to usefulness who died a failure.


---Roy L. Smith, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, Rochester, N.Y., Sept. 25, 1930.



No man can possibly improve by devoting his talents to work he cannot admire.


---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 15, 1929.

The greater the devotion the greater the reward.


---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 30, 1933.

No real happiness comes when our interest in our rights overshadows our devotion to our duties.


---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 5, 1930.

Devotion to ideals is a reliable compass in all human enterprise.


---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 17, 1937.


Nothing lightens endeavor like cheerful devotion to duty.


---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 6, 1964.

Devotion is the ultimate test of true greatness, and the quality which must accompany ambition, work, and appreciation if ideals are to become realities.


---Ruth Folkman, Weber Herald, Ogden, Utah, May 22, 1923.

Nothing spurs one to usefulness more than does the consciousness of responsibility and the personal realization that there is something very important that ought to be done by one, irrespective of anyone else. In other words, each one of us should feel in his heart that he must dedicate his life to an overall of usefulness, using the abilities and talents given, to him at birth to their greatest end. Those who have become the greatest benefactors to all mankind—discovers, inventors, scientists, missionaries, teachers, artists, and such have always been those who had in their hearts dedicated themselves to a high purpose. And that has been the incentive that urged them on—gave them personal happiness and satisfaction. To feel that you are dedicated to a great idea or plan is to own something that may be intangible, but it’s something that places you among the permanent in life. Those who dedicate themselves to the task of gaining for the world universal freedom, and those who follow these heroes and heroines, dedicating themselves to its preservation, are the ones who inspire all mankind in its trek toward decency, happiness, and a peaceful world—a world without fear, and a warless world. Selfishness is all crowded out when you dedicate yourself to some noble purpose. The desire for such fleeting things as wealth, fame, and social glory dies, and in their place is gained a spiritual calm that dispels all worry, flooding the mind with hope, and giving zest to every act in life. The way is open for the humblest of us to dedicate his life to some useful purpose of idea. All we have to do is to make a decision and follow it out. There is always something needful that ought to be done. Opportunities await everywhere, and at all times. Living the dedicated life is to live the triumphant life!

---George Matthew Adams, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., May 13, 1944.

There is enough courage in this world to change it overnight. The trouble is that there is too little discipline devoted to dedication. As each of us dedicates our life to some definite end or purpose, we grow in breadth of mind and learn the law of universal brotherhood. Through personal dedication of our talents, gifts of personality, and our inward dreams and desires, we become less selfish and take upon ourselves the hopes and hungers of others. Not, however, without many a personal struggle and many a defeat. It takes opposition to bring out the beauty and wonder of the diamond! Being one of the hardest of substances, long labor is required to bring it to its perfection. Character is developed and brought to its high standard by just such opposition. But it takes great discipline to accomplish an outstanding character. One must, therefore, dedicate himself to high standards through discipline. I like that phrase, “one increasing purpose.” Implanted within the mind and heart, it sweeps opposition before it, continually reinforcing the dedication of one’s energies, one’s ideas, and one’s faith.

---George Matthew Adams, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., Dec. 19, 1944.

No person becomes great except through the process of dedication to something bigger than himself.

—Charles L. Allen, The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 11, 1956.

Dedication is the desire to go forth enthusiastically.

—Marcus J. Bellison, Testifier, Wellington, New Zealand, December 1963.

A person cannot be dedicated unless he is willing to sacrifice. Therefore, a willingness to sacrifice is proper proof of dedication.

—James Brey, Fishers of Men, Hamburg, West Germany, April 1972.

Dedication might be defined as loyalty to conviction made manifest through action. ... Dedication is the driving force that pushes faith beyond disappointment and adversity until success is found.

—Robert B. Lochhead, Fishers of Men, Hamburg, West Germany, April 1972.

When we describe someone as being "dedicated," what qualities of personality do we attempt to define? What makes a dedicated man? Certainly dedication requires singlemindedness of purpose, determination, faith, patience, energy, and perseverance. Dedicated people must have goals or objectives to which they are dedicated. There must be an object of dedication. Can you be described accurately as a dedicated person? If not, what qualities of dedication do you lack? If you are dedicated, what is the object of your dedication? A careful self-analysis should help us to answer these questions honestly. The honest answers will probably have a considerable bearing upon our happiness and success. To what goals, if any, are you dedicated? Or is the motivation which you feel something less than dedication? It is the dedicated people who change the world. Saul of Tarsus demonstrated this. So did Adolph Hitler. The power of a dedicated individual is awesome, whether it be for good, or for evil.

—Dean L. Larsen, El Animador, San Antonio, Texas, May 1969.

To be dedicated is to be determined, to be dependable, and to be enthusiastic about the work you are engaged in. Dedication is maintaining the goal of becoming the most successful person instead of harboring the more popular attitude of doing just enough to get by. Being dedicated is the ability you have to accomplish a job whether you are supervised or not. The degree of dedication that is exemplified each day has a direct correlation with the degree of success we will enjoy throughout our lives. To obtain a high degree of success we must develop within ourselves the kind of self-control that will enable us to maintain a high degree of performance. We must commit ourselves to course of action and follow the commitment with constant effort. To be a consistent performer you must first be a consistent planner, a consistent worker, and have a consistent attitude of success.

—Preston E. Naylor, Thoroughbred Pacer, Louisville, Ky., September 1971.

Dedication consists of many elements, the chief of which is consistency. That is, being constantly aggressive and enthusiastic, not hot and cold with periods of extreme aggression and enthusiasm followed by periods of depression and frustration.

—Maurice F. Peterson, Southern States Success, Atlanta, Ga., December 1962.

We often hear the term, "dedication to purpose." First, what is dedication, and secondly, what is purpose? To dedicate is to devote or consecrate. Dedication is the degree that we can devote our time, talents and strengths to a purpose. Dedication must come from the heart. It is not something that can be transferred upon command to another. Understanding and faith in the purpose are necessary to lead any man to a working and meaningful dedication. The purpose or object of dedication is important in determining the value of our efforts.

—George D. Pitts, Spirit of Texas, Dallas, Texas, February 1965.

If one is to be dedicated there must be deep and abiding convictions. There must be a compelling sense of mission or purpose, in addition. Along with these there must be an awareness of need coupled with a desire upon the part of the person to fill or meet this need. If all of this results in action it can be said that the person is dedicated.

—Oscar Lee Rives, Baptist and Reflector, Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 14, 1963.

No matter how gifted a person may be, there must be an attitude of complete dedication if there is to be any worthwhile achievement. The athlete knows this quite well, but it is also true in any worthy endeavor in life. More people fail because of lack of dedication than lack of talent. Wholehearted dedication can often make up for a shortage of talent. ... Sacrifice is always involved in complete dedication. Dedication involves the willingness to pay whatever price necessary to get the job done.

—C.E. Colton, Baptist Standard, Dallas, Texas, Aug. 3, 1983.

Dedication and competence are meant to go together. A dedicated but incompetent man is a promise unfulfilled. A selfish but competent man is a promise without social justification.

—F. Henry Edwards, Stride, Independence, Mo., December 1956.

He has achieved success who has dedicated his best to the best.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Dec. 23, 1930.

Where life is unreservedly dedicated to a cause, that cause will feel the impact of that dedication and be carried forward. Will a man withhold himself from the way of self-denial and self-sacrifice for his cause? Will a man refuse to give his best to the cause he serves? Then his cause will suffer. But let a man devote himself, heart and soul, or, as one of the old prophets said, "with both hands earnestly," let a man give himself to a cause like that and the cause will be carried gloriously forward. That principle may be applied widely even in every direction whithersoever he may turn. We may apply that principle in life's daily work. Carlyle said, "Give me a man who sings at his work." Let a man go grumbling and moping and whining at his work, counting the minutes until the dinner horn shall sound, and it will be very bad for the man and very bad for his work. But let a man go singing at his work, putting his utmost into it, overflowing with devotion, and sometime he will be at the head of the movement and people will come seeking to learn the secret of his achievement. He put himself, his best, his all into the movement.

—George W. Truett, Christian Index, Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 14, 1937.

We need to put more feeling into our thinking, but we also need to put more thinking into our feeling. Emotion without devotion may lead to commotion.

---Perry F. Webb, Baptist Standard, Dallas, Texas, Jan. 12, 1957.

Devotion directs the use of power. Devotion inspires love of a cause, belief in it, willingness to sacrifice for it. The devoted man has faith in the truth of his labor and in its ultimate conquest. Do you love anything so well that life itself seems desirable? Then you are devoted to it. Do you love that something so well that you are willing to set aside ordinary pursuits and labor for it daily? Then you are devoted to it. To live for a cause, to sacrifice for it in life, are greater tests than to die for it. Such devotion to a cause invariably brings power, not to be measured by common standards. The martyrs for truth and the heroes of sacrifice have been moved upon by devotion to render their high service to humanity. The common man who faithfully and patiently performs his duty to family, friends and society possesses the living power that comes from devotion. The devoted man needs little supervision and few regulations. He finds his work from day to day. He is a self-starter. If you can learn to fill your day with earnest labor, without being directed in every detail; if you can be trusted to complete your task, under only general regulations--then you have learned a secret of greatness.

—John A. Widtsoe, East Central States Mission Bulletin, Louisville, Ky., June 1940.

Devotion which leaves no room for duty fails of its purpose.

—James DeForest Murch, Christian Standard, Cincinnati, Ohio, March 14, 1942.

Devotion is that feeling of endurance which makes work a joy in doing, that earnest effort which holds us far above the trials, struggles, heartaches, and the insurmountable obstacles which fall into our paths.

—W.C. Erickson, Northern States News, Chicago, Ill., October 1964.

Consistency is a great virtue, one of the greatest a person can possess. To follow a schedule every day and do a full, honest day's work shows dedication and devotion. Consistency indicates stability and reliability.

—Bruce D. Cottam, Messenger of Glory, Sutton Coldfield, England, March 13, 1965.

What is a goal, if not simply a tool to direct our hearts toward dedication and our thoughts toward success?

—Willis J. Blaine, Fishers of Men, Hamburg, West Germany, January 1965.

So often in our lives we set our goals at a high level and then when the goal is achieved, there is an inclination to "let down" and be less than we were. Even some of our most successful people have these dangerous downdrifts to deal with. There seems to be an ebb as well as a flow in every success. Too often we take a kind of leave of absence from our best efforts. But at any time that we live at less than our best, a worsening process gets started from which it is pretty difficult to recover. When we release pressure, we immediately begin to slip from the high place we have occupied. As soon as we let down the bars of our ambitions or allow our dedication to be sidetracked or turn off our personal power, we automatically begin to decline. So far as is known, no one has ever been seen coasting uphill. We need to be able to replace our letdowns with upswings, for when we permit letdowns in our work or our enthusiasm, a tailspin always takes place in our accomplishments.

—Edna J. Broadbent, Mitarbeiter, Frankfurt, West Germany, Dec. 1, 1967.

An essential prerequisite to achievement is an intense desire to gain a definite goal. It sounds trite, but it is tremendous. Really to achieve, a leader must be possessed by a goal and a commitment. There must be enough intensity, excitement, yearning, and internal drive to incite and sustain effort. ... How can anybody follow a leader who does not have a full dedication to a high purpose expressed in specific goals? ... Men who achieve are dedicated men. Their dream, their desire, possesses them and motivates them. It makes study to be eagerly sought and undertaken. It makes cooperative planning with others a natural process spontaneously achieved.

—Harold E. Ingraham, The Sunday School Builder, Nashville, Tenn., April 1960.

Enthusiasm is radiance, it is exuberance of spirit, it is dedication expressing itself. It is refusal to be repressed, to quit. It is joy in action. It is the oil of energy for getting things done.

—Harold E. Ingraham, The Quarterly Review: A Survey of Southern Baptist Progress, Nashville, Tenn., October-December 1968.

Dedication is the force that impels true service. Thus the type or quality of our service is a sample of our true dedication.

—David J. Lambert, Testifier, Wellington, New Zealand, May 1969.

A dedicated will to do that which is right and just will clothe itself with power.

---Earl Riney, Church Management, Cleveland, Ohio, December 1951.

Working for a cause which is higher than self make total dedication much easier.

—Thomas F. Rogers, BYU Today, Provo, Utah, March 1976.

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