OK UK?: Indian Food, England's National Dish

A man in need of a good curry...
A man in need of a good curry...

Yorkshire Pud -v- Poppadum

Like a horror movie, many of my generation recoil in horror at what passed for food on our poor embattled island. Vegetables, boiled to the point that made identification impossible, would be sloshed onto our plates with a boiled starch ball that once was a potato, and something limp that used to be meat, original animal unknown.

If covered in a brown sauce (gravy minus the taste), it would have been cow, chicken or pig. If the tasteless sauce was white, it had once been a fish. Didn’t matter, they all tasted the same. Even the addition of salt was rather pointless. The dish just went from bland to saline bland. Because you were not sure what you had just eaten, and the only sensation to be gleaned from the experience was that of feeling full, you then added pudding into the mix.

Pudding was like an entire starch group on the food pyramid, but there was a little sugar added to let you know this was both dessert and a treat. Some fruit may have been involved, usually a raisin, or an upside down pineapple on truly special occasions. The pudding was steamed and covered in a yellowish liquid concoction called custard. This was technically flavored with vanilla, and if you were super lucky could contain little slices of bananas.

This delightful repast would be either dinner or lunch and needed to “see you through” to teatime.

Now, I love my mother dearly, but she was not a happy cook. And not being happy in the kitchen is a guarantee that what comes out will not makes other happy either. She did most of the cooking. Enough said…

My dad on the other hand loved food and was a great cook. His enthusiasm led to some particularly spectacular portions, which meant we tended to eat his offerings over several days, but he created a nascent foodie.

Sunday’s were different. We would roast beef, pork, lamb, or a chicken on Sunday, the first three referred to as the “Sunday joint,” (much to the amusement of She-who-is-adored - California girl, what can I say?) and even better, roast potatoes cooked in the meat drippings. That salty/savory taste made my buds salivate in anticipation. Sometimes the meat and potatoes would be partnered with a Yorkshire pudding and covered in real gravy made from the rest of the drippings and a little flour. It tasted so good I could even forgive my dad his love of brussel-sprouts. If it was lamb, there would be a freshly made mint sauce, if pork, apple sauce. I cannot tell you how much I loved Sunday dinner, (yup, served at noon.)

Pure hell for my dear sister though, an avowed vegetarian from a very young age. She was pressured to eat the meat, which by deft slight of hand usually ended up on my plate, she enjoyed the potatoes, but would physically gag on the spouts, those lovely little concentrated cabbage balls…

I was glad to help out, only the result is that she is a slim as the day she married, and I am not.

There was a little variety once a Chinese take away restaurant opened up in a nearby town, but seeing as “lemon chicken” was the only thing my mother would eat, we all ate lemon chicken. And, knowing no better, thoroughly enjoyed the sauce made of pure MSG with a bit of lemon juice added for authenticity. (Just sauce and rice for my sister…)

On Friday’s my dad would pick up fish and chips on his way home, he taught me to add vinegar to the mix and the sweet salty sharp tang was the best way to start any weekend.

The true taste epiphany came somewhere near my twelfth birthday. Dad belonged to a luncheon club. Once a week, a group of men would gather at a different restaurant to talk and eat. One day, dad came home smelling funny, so I asked why. Turns out that the luncheon club had met at an Indian restaurant, and dad had partaken of a vindaloo. This being the polar opposite of bland, I believe I said something like, “I like vindaloo, dad, can we get some?”

My father, knowing full well that I had no idea what vindaloo or any curry was, sweetly replied, “Next Birthday then?” And the deal was done. I don’t remember doing too many things with just dad and me, but the night of our first Indian meal together, was epic. The restaurant was upstairs, above the Co-op furniture store, and was full of rich red furnishings and the most amazing smell. The waiters were Indian, and thus exotic, the music, strange to my ear, added to the whole experience. This was not a meal. It was a journey to a new and exciting culture, and I relished every part of it.

Chapattis, poppadoms, chicken tika, and my first curry; it was pure heaven. Sure it was a little hot for my young taste buds, but did I care? Every bite was a revelation, the pain giving way to spicy flavors that made my eyes water and my taste buds crave for more. This was the food equivalent of going to a house of ill repute and discovering women after a lifetime of abstinence. Seriously naughty but nice!

I looked at my dad, sweating profusely, with a smile spread from ear to ear, and knew we were sharing a seminal moment in my life.

There weren’t many opportunities to indulge my new-found passion at home, but once I got to University, the love affair was rekindled. One of my best friends was Indian and he began my education in the regional differences as we explored the many restaurants in the city.

I even lived next door to an Indian Take Out for a while. The smell having driven out the last tenant, I got both a reduced rent and my food fix in one fell swoop. After multiple visits the owner got tired of me ordering the same three items and produced a platter with some twenty or so different tastes, with the names handwritten on the lid, and told me to try them all in a particular order.

I found my favorite meal that night, lamb korma, and ridiculous as it may sound, the one thing I truly miss about England…

Dear Hub Reader


If you enjoy this hub, please check out my book,

Homo Domesticus; A Life Interrupted By Housework,

A collection of my best writings woven into a narrative on a very strange year in my life.

Available directly from:

http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-book/homo-domesticus/12217500

Chris


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Comments 33 comments

sueroy333 profile image

sueroy333 5 years ago from Indiana

Chris, I'm so hungry right now I could spit!

I now understand why you are so patient with those of us who abhor the kitchen... thank God your dad was like my husband! Whenever he's off the road my kid gets really excited.. she knows we're going to have an actual dinner!

I loved this trip down culinary memory lane.

Now that I've spit, I think I will go get a peanut butter sandwich, throw on some curry, and pretend it's Indian food.


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

Sue,

I drove myself nuts writing this as a cheese sandwich was not going to cut it...

I'm told that there are great Indian restaurants locally, but to me they never quite hit the mark. I figured out that what I craved was English Indian food, which is about as authentic as American Mexican food ( a close number two in the "Chris loves it" category!)

Not sure I'd like your local cuisine if it consists of spit, though...

C


sueroy333 profile image

sueroy333 5 years ago from Indiana

I'm completely with you on the American Mexican food, I'm not sure I'd like the real thing, buy Taco Bell is my savior. It's too bad they don't deliver to po-dunk towns..er.. villages.

I didn't spit ON the peanut butter and curry sandwich. I spit on the sidewalk. (I have a ticket to prove it.) Now does it sound better?? :)


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

Sue,

You manage to make Milltown (no mill, not much of a town?) sound hella good and all, but with TB 1% meat taco's the balance is once again tipped in your favor.

Glad the spit cuisine was a mistake on my part, but you've tasted snails right?

I am so screwed. Here I miss Indian food, and if I ever went back to England I'd miss the Mexican food. Can you even imagine what a mess they would make of pronouncing "guacamole" or "quesadilla"? let alone how bad it would taste...

Need to go and read today's hubs, two from you by golly - girl's gone crazy...

C


Stan Fletcher profile image

Stan Fletcher 5 years ago from Nashville, TN

Great one Chris. I love Indian food. I hadn't had it until 1998. I was going on a trip to India and thought I better hit an Indian restaurant before I went. They have some good Indian food in Seattle. Eating it in India was interesting to say the least. Much of India is filthy, but as they say, "When in Rome..." So I ignored the setting in which it was being cooked and chowed down. Only got violently ill once.


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

Stan,

As I understand it 99% of the best restaurants on the planet are in Seattle, so no suprise re the Indian one.

Officially jealous that you have been to India. Being English, and lazy, we just waited for them to come to us...

Dehli Belly is no fun!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

Oh, Chris - I love your food hubs! Well - I love all your weekly selections of hubs, for that matter. But your love of good food make these such a trip! Hugs.

Our UK experience was good. The food we had was quite tasty, both prepared in the couple's home in which we were guests for a month and at various pubs and places we where we were treated. I'll always love the bread puddings and they are incomparable. The first one was at that men's club near the Queen Mother's house where another online friend treated us and all the food was excellent.

I suppose that fish and chips were my least favorite treats. I am not fond of greasy foods. But it was ok.

I adore curry. I use it on all kinds of food. Turmeric, too. Eggs benefit greatly from them, as do soups and rice. I frequently have yellowish fingers.

My experience with Indian food began in the early 1980s. It was a treat for George & me at an Indian restaurant by an Indian friend from work, who actually stood up with George at our wedding. Surish also invited us to a meal at home, prepared by his wife and mother. It was heavenly. He was a vegetarian so these meals involved no meats. But the flavors were just wonderful.

Of course, I was born in a Texas town one mile from Mexico. Mexican food was "normal" in my upbringing. Tex-Mex is another form of it, but I ate food prepared by our Mexican foreman's wife at the ranch. She made her tamales and stored them buried underground. There was no refrigeration, you see. But they apparently stayed ok - no one died. I only tasted those when she'd just made them, though.

She also made her own tortillas and everything else that went with them. There was nothing non-authentic there! But honestly I like Tex-Mex more and the Mexican adaptations in Arizona and California are tasty, as well.

When I lived in Indiana - there were NO Mexican restaurants and NO ingredients for any were available except Old El Paso canned stuff. There may be no Indian restaurants there even now!

We tried to bring crisp taco shells back from Texas once but the humidity got to them before we got them into the house I bought the canned tortillas and fried them myself to make taco shells for the times when Mexican food was to be served. That's tricky! Needs peanut oil to get hot enough and something to "form" the shape when the tortillas are immersed in it. If the oil isn't hot enough, they turn to shoe leather and if the shaping doesn't start the moment they are inserted in the oil, they go every-which-way like my hair if it's not disciplined. I prepared enchiladas and tacos for guests and they considered it "gourmet" cooking. I was amazed. Of course there were no avocados or any form of them available so that guacamole was not on the menu. I could have made my own salsa but there were no jalapenos or other appropriate peppers available.

Heck - pizza had not even been introduced to the area! When my inlays visited us in Waco, and we served pizza, my mother-in-law went out and sat on the front steps to avoid even the aroma! (A wee peek into what life was like among the folks up there for this Texas gal. -Gradually my ex began to resist flavor and retreat to the blandness on which he was reared, too.)


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

Nellieanna,

I just love your responses - and I'm really glad you survived the big freeze!

If I was ever forced to become a vegetarian, I would have to turn to Indian food, period. Your tales of mexican food mirror the experience of my wife. She lived next door to Joe and Mrs. Joe in El Monte CA and the smells, taste and texture are memories from her childhood.

It is funny how one country adapts the foods from another, and often makes it better. I love the German version of the American hot dog - particularly the curry wurst, and pizza in Italy is very different - with regional variations that bear no resemblance at all to the US versions.

And poor beknighted English food, still getting a bad rap, but I know the gastronomic landscape has changed greatly. You should have tasted what they called coffee in my childhood!!!

C


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

Thank you, Chris! I always ramble on and on. You're kind to put up with it. But I think of comments as part of a conversation, especially when the subject rings a chime - not just a swift word or two to mark my passing. And by the way - this rates votes, too.

Ah - well - I lucked out, I suppose - the food - the coffee - the beer - the tea - everything in England was yummy. I could not bring myself to consider haggis, though. Of course - the Mexican cuisine has menudo, which I can't bear to think about either. And at the ranch, after a very occasional slaughtering of a goat (my dad raised sheep and Angora goats for the wool & mohair) - Mother would make something she called "Son-of-a-Gun Stew. Goat meat is greasy to begin with and then I saw what-all went into that stew pot and I never tasted it, though she seasoned it up quite dramatically and it smelled pretty good cooking on the old wood cook-stove. My mother was famous for not wasting anything. So you can imagine. Groan.

Speaking of coffee, my memories of awakening out there to the aroma of the coffee making on that old wood cook-stove -- divine! I always wanted coffee even when a kid. They would add a few drops to my milk to appease me. The frijoles she would start early in the day to cooking were another wonderfully tempting thing. Full of onions, peppers, salt pork - the authentic way. I would start sampling them before they were even softened up. Of course they improved as they cooked and made that thickened juice dried beans make. They were pinto beans. We always had beans no matter what else - at the ranch. Our garden - in that rocky soil with so little water - usually was only onions and peppers. Little Nellieanna always craved veggies and would sit in the garden gobbling onions and HOT peppers like candy. I can't take that much heat now - but it didn't phase me then.

Indiana and Ohio have some pretty good German restaurants. And I like a lot of German dishes. There are some towns in Texas which are predominantly German and have great food, too. Also Alsasian, Czechoslavakian enclaves are around the state and the foods are divine. Mexican is not our only foreign influence. lol. Then we are close to Louisiana with its wonderful French and Cajun cuisines. um, um!


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

Nellieanna,

Your writing is so visual and intimate it is like peeking in from another dimension, it is so much greater than a "conversation", believe me. My poor wife is a little baffled as I speak of you and Sue and Stan as if we had spent the afternoon together in a coffee shop ...

And seeing as there are plenty of days where I don't speak to more than one person all day, these conversations are very important indeed.

I met with a group of hubbers in LA last year, which was fun, but geography did not define our grouping. We have created villages in cyberspace, every bit as much a community as a farming village in the Cotswolds. I hear from friends in England, New Zealand, Australia, Ireland and all over the US - what an absolute treat - we share intimacies, bare our souls at times, and try to keep each other amused, like I said, a community.

Don't ever curtail your responses, I relish them,

Chris


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

You are so kind!!

I was thinking of your wife earlier, - and wondering how it is for Hubbers' spouses in general when we become so involved with friends online. In other areas, there have been some strong feelings in some instances. But my George became quite used to it and, though he didn't like online socializing for himself, he was "friends" through me with a number of my buddies. Sometimes I would be the "translator" of messages between him and people with whom he shared fishing or golfing interests, typing as fast as I could like a court recorder! LOL. He could never get used to the speed with with instant messaging progresses but when I was doing the typing, he had no slow gear. One of my friends in Canada had George named poet laureate of his town by their mayor and he and his wife exchanged Christmas gifts with George & me. I had us make a little video for them in thanks, and it was from that video that the poet laureate thing evolved. Amazing.

In the "olden" days of my online life - before groups and Facebook & Twitter, before blogs and all the places we can meet now, there were just Chatrooms - nothing like the add-ons to groups and FB that stumble along now. These were the sole intimate meeting places in the sense of getting to know one another, joined by special interests, age groups or whatever.

In late 1996, I hadn't intended to even be involved with "the net" when I got a computer (a laptop) equipped with the setup to get online. But the idea of registering the computer via the net was appealing. I had gotten the thing just before we were to go to the ranch for an extended stay so mailing in the registration card was a bigger hassle. So I figured out how to hook it up to the phone, decided to join MSN for my ISP and signed 'er up.

At the ranch, I saw that the software on it could be registered by means of online too, but the phone service at the ranch wouldn't even begin to work - not to mention that MSN was not available anywhere for hundreds of miles. - But I knew so little! I tried and tried. I called the Big Bend Telephone Co.(close as 200 + miles away) who furnished our microwave phone service. They tried to explain the problem, but my knowledge was so meager I didn't understand what "baud" was or that it was just not going to work. I actually took the laptop out to the telephone pole and connected it right there in hopes that the line from there to our RV was really the culprit! It was very sunny so I sat on the ground & covered me and the PC up with a blanket so I could see the screen. George never let me live that down! Of course - it was futile, besides.

Anyway - when we returned to Dallas, and I could get connected, first thing I saw was MSN Comic Chat and the next thing I knew (after playing on it most of the night & dealing with offers to be my booty) - I was hooked. I told George about the offers and we had a huge laugh. And I decided then and there that being online was not going to be different for me than being real in life. Propositions that "it's only the internet - it's not real" reminded me that it was MY fingers on the keyboard and MY mind directing them, whether or not I was visible on the other end of a connection. Not that I never flirted - but I was fully aware of the issues as I would be "IRL". I also figured that one's reputation would be known online just as easily - or more so, as fast as it distributes.

So I formed some lasting friendships which I still enjoy from that early chat and over the years some of the groups met on "real time, real life" Get Togethers. We met in Vegas, Branson, here in Dallas, Florida - wherever someone organized a GTG. And it was as you describe the meeting with the Hubbers in LA - there were no geographical definitions of the participants. We were a family.

I'd jumped into my website creation soon after getting online and was always the historian for these meetings, taking pictures and making beautiful memorable webpages about each one we attended. There are still some summaries of some of them on my website, - but the original coverage was very thorough for each one. We would spent 3 or 4 days in intense being together in whatever place, and I covered every aspect with my photo-journalism. It was really fun. People flew or drove from vast distances to participate. I wonder if that would even be feasible now. It was memorable and I see you can relate to it.

Anyway - I hope your sweet wife can understand that these are good healthy friendships and provide a wider horizon than would otherwise be possible. It is like spending the afternoon together in a coffee shop. Incidentally, I met Dave Price when he was passing through Dallas and we did spend about 2 hours talking non-stop in a coffee shop. It was delightful. It was so good to find him the authentic good guy as he appears on here. He'd mentioned that he would be coming through here and I told him to give me a call - and he did. I've met his wife on Facebook since and become friends.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

This is the url for one of the summaries of my coverage of one of those chatroom get-togethers at Branson - http://nellieanna.com/02brnsnhilites.html


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

Nellieanna,

If you are ever anywhere near California you absolutely must look me up, I'm not sure I would get a word in edgeways once you and my wife Maryl get to talking, but I'd be happy to take the risk. I understand that some of the women hubbers are bothered occasionally by unwelcome attention, Nell Rose wrote a funny hub about it, but it is a world like any other. Full of both the good and bad and inherently niether. I think like minded people find each other, which is why I feel so comfortable with a few of our fellow hubbers. You know that Sue and I would get thrown out of whatever establishment we met in for being too rowdy!

My wife has no concerns, my love and loyalty know no bounds, plus I married up. Way up!

And good friends are the jewels in the crown of life...

C


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

Nellieanna,

What fun!

I'm guessing you are the type of person who can have a party anyplace, anytime, or by yourself if necessary!

Great pictures. You must miss George very much...

C


tdennis 5 years ago

You need to check out this place then. It is in El Toro, or what is now Lake Forest in what used to be the Nickel Nickel arcade. www.ninasgrocery.net/


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

One never knows, Chris. George's niece and her husband lived in Sacramento when I visited them a couple of summers ago, but they've moved to Gilroy to be nearer some of the kids. But they are to visit here next month so it may be awhile before I visit them again. One of my first and dearest online friends whom I've never met is in San Diego and we've talked of sometime meeting face-to-face. He is retired Navy and still works for the Navy as a civilian there. George was Navy too, and they have exchanged war stories at times, via me. There is a friend in L.A. but I've sort of lost touch with her during my hiatus from groups, though we go back further than any recent ones. That happens sometimes.

Maryl sounds delightful. George and I had no concerns for each other's love and loyalty either, so I quite understand. I think each of us felt we'd married up. :-) Certainly good friends are the jewels. One of my major Sections in my website is devoted to that, with many pages of specific gems/friends from online eras. I haven't added any pages of jewels recently, even though there are many more recent jewels in the actual crown!

Thank you for visiting my page about the 2002 Branson Get Together. It was one of many such events, between 1998 and 2002. George's initial heart attack which started his downward spiral occurred August 31, 2001, shortly before the 3rd annual GTG was to occur and just before 9/11/01. Some of the group went on and had the GTG but it was wracked with sadness and even some further misfortune. There was another one at Tahoe in 2003, and we considered going, but we still traveled in our RV (with our cats, we needed to) and George really wasn't up to hitching and setting up an RV or the long trip, so we decided not to go. But there were many wonderful memories of all those events in which we did participate.

Sue is a delight. You both have such fantastic senses of humor and wry wit! Maybe it's time to think about a small Hubber get together?

I did discover an unsuspected talent & penchant for party giving and going when I came out of my bookworm's cocoon at age 40! I came out of a tragic 18-year marriage and after moving back to Texas in a couple of years, I married a man 14 years my senior whose life was like a constant party. That lasted only 6 years but they were actually good years. Then I found my soulmate and our relationship and marriage lasted 29 years until he died a bit over 2 years ago. We were more naturally akin in most every way. Less partying, enough bookworming, andt still capable of getting into a party mode. We were, as you say - capable of just the two of us having a ball! I do miss him fiercely. We were literally inseparable as far as ever being apart for 24 hours at a time, except for a handful of nights during the entire duration and those in response to urgent demands by other family and work. We each respected the other's privacy and could be doing our own things in other parts of our domicile and then come together at the end of the day. Or we might spend the entire time together. We just never had separate vacations by choice.

You're right - I've always been able to be joyous alone. Long summers at the ranch without playmates taught me to entertain myself and most of those 18 years in that marriage when I didn't drive and was almost isolated also provided ample time to be self-sufficient in the cheer and challenge departments.

I've been misunderstood for an adage of mine: "If it can't be fun, why do it?" Serious siblings mistook it to mean I didn't take life seriously enough or was irresponsible. Quite the opposite, though. I just know how to brighten even a dark prospect and make the most of it - which tends to make my life look carefree. Of course - there are cares and I can get "down" but I can't stay down.

Oh dear - how I ramble. If you won't stop me, I must stop myself! Hugs.


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

Tim,

You are a scholar and a gentleman...


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

Nellieanna,

If life is meant to be lived richly, you seem to have done, are doing, and will do that to the full - it is very inspiring.

As Valentine's day approaches I reflect on my greatest blessing, my wonderful wife. We both came out of empty, negative marriages, never planing to do that again and, well...almost twenty years to date, with very few days apart. (How we met and the way the universe lined up for us is a story I keep trying to write. I'm not sure I can do it justice yet...)

Chris


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

Chris - it would be a delectable story, I know! But I can understand your reticence. I remember the moment George and I met vividly. Your phrase "how the universe lined up for us. . . " is so aptly expressive!


sueroy333 profile image

sueroy333 5 years ago from Indiana

Chris- I just had to poke my nose in here and tell you that I enjoyed your and Nellieanna's conversation as much as your hub! Being a narcissist, I was pleased my name was thrown in there!

I have a strong feeling that if Nellieanna came to an establishment with us, she might get kicked out as well.. just for the experience. We would get kicked out for uncontrollable laughter and making each other blow milk out our noses. Maryl would hold her head high, like the classy woman she is, and get a corner booth to watch the fun. :)


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

Sue,

My fear is that the three "girls" would never let me get a word in edgeways, I'd be the one at the corner table, feeling ignored and playing with my iPad! Doesn't Nellieanna just write the best responses though?

C


sueroy333 profile image

sueroy333 5 years ago from Indiana

She is the most genuine of persons. I love her!

I wish I could press my little triangle, say "beam me up, Scottie" and we could all have lunch. I have a feeling we would all just enjoy listening to anything she had to say. (There would have to some shooting of the milk-through-the-nose, though, I would hate to come all that way through space, and not spit something across the room).


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

How about a blue margarita through the nose? (bet it would do wonders for a stuffy nose)


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

As Picard would say...

Make it so

(The next generation was my favorite)

I got my map out, and the equidistant point between Dallas, Milltown and Lemon County is either Alpha Centuri or somewhere like Kansas. My vote goes to Alpha Centuri as I have no idea how to speak Kansan. My map skills might be a bit off as I was using a globe and a ruler in centimeters (foriegn measures, you know, like inches but smaller and no worms named after them...)


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

Nellieanna,

So I'm new to this. What exactly is a blue margarita? I've heard of blue movies, which suprisingly have a whole bunch of regular colors, not just blue, with a preponderance of pink. (Or so my random guy friends tell me...)

Let me guess, once upon a time there was this little agave plant, not treated well by her parents, who left home looking for love in all the wrong places. Thinking she was in love with Pedro, she let him take some intimate photographs, and before you know it she was into liquor and a life of the blues. She took the street name'Tequilla' and you can buy her, and her friend Margarita for just a few dollars at the bar...

I may have wandered a little off base here...

C


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

Tee hee, Chris! OK. First - let me establish that you have heard of an actual, non-hooker type margarita? In case not - it's an alcoholic beverage made with Mexican tequila. Teguila is made only in certain regions in Mexico (by law to protect the monopoly!) - from the Blue Agave plant which does grow there. This plant is considered a cactus but I understand it is actually related to a lily. Other agaves are used in making tequila's county cousin, mescal. That's the one that sometimes has a worm in it. Ugh. By the way - unlike the - uh - lady in your version, the name "tequila" comes from a place in Mexico by that name, which they got by the Conquistadors distorting a native Indian tribe's name. (Maybe I prefer your version with Pedro and the blue movie better! However wandering off base with you could be disastrous!)

Ahem - so - to continue my more straight-laced version. . . I don't believe the Blue Agave's juices are actually blue. Normally tequila is clear or "silver". To make a margarita blue, the addition of Blue Curacao is necessary. It's an orangey flavored liqueur whose blue color, I believe, is authentic, though it seems to vary from a sapphire to a more turquoise blue. (My mother considered blue an inappropriate color for anything to be swallowed. She knew about poisonous Mercury compounds which are deadly and blue, you see. She threw out the blue food coloring from the set and never ever made a cake icing blue!)

But I'm aware of this blue margarita thing right now because my stepson and his girlfriend took me to the Blue Mesa for my birthday. However, it was lunch and I didn't have a margarita with mine. I had a glass of white wine instead. But Blue Mesa specializes in blue margaritas, along with really yummy southwestern-style Mexican food, which is more sophisticated than regular Tex-Mex.

Margaritas, whether or not blue, have a fresh citrus component, usually lime juice, but sometimes lemon. If not blue, they have triple sec in them, so the orangey flavor is part of the formula. The concoction often has a greenish color. Frozen margaritas are another form. Alcohol doesn't freeze solid, so the semi-frozen results are rather frothy. Really a treat on a super-hot Texas day. Also margaritas can be made with various other real fruit flavors, though real aficionados wouldn't be caught dead drinking a "strawberry margarita" or any of its cousins.


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

That, my dear Nellieanna, is a comment that should be a hub!

They mess with some of what you have explained, in California, but they are a staple with the Tex-Mex food out here.

Really, you should write this with appetizing pictures, be a big hit!

C


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

That is a capital idea! I'm not much of a food writer, though. I might need expert help!


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

You read my recipes, right? Not much of an expert am I?

You are way more capable than me, probably end up being in verse with evocative artwork, if I know you!

Hic!

Chris


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 5 years ago from TEXAS

ohgoodgrief.


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

Nellieanna,

Be careful, I got Sue to write her Wal-Mart wedding hub...

C


sueroy333 profile image

sueroy333 5 years ago from Indiana

Nellieanna- I saw the hubmob weekly thingy was on the unusual history of things. You should so write on the history of the blue margarita!!!

Chris- The Next Generation was the best. I have watched every episode at least twice. Picard is awesome. Now you just need one of Nellie's blue margarita's, DVDs of Star Trek TNG!

I do believe I'll have to head out to you and Nellieanna as I'm not on friendly terms with the folks on Alpha Centuri. It seems they're fond of their rocks, and weren't too happy when I tried to chew one. They said something about me being a hillbilly, and well, let's just say it didn't end well.

I do, however, have a great rock collection I can bring with me when I come to visit!


ChrisLincoln profile image

ChrisLincoln 5 years ago from Orange (or Lemon...) County, California Author

Sue,

That would, you know, rock...

Chelsea would have to chaperone, and please bring your husband so I have someone to talk to!

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