Soccer, rhymes, and the fun of the game captured in a colorful read aloud picture book

Soccer plus rhymes combine to create a fun read aloud picture book

Children are playing soccer with teammates at a young age now. Many children as young as 2 years of age now have a soccer ball in their collection of toys. Linda Ashman has captured the fun of this sport in her colorful read aloud picture book "Hey, Coach!", illustrated by Kim Smith. The fun of a first practice session is introduced with characters who have smiling faces and all the excitement of choosing teams, their team's color, and a name for each team. The basic skills of dribbling, chasing the ball, passing, and taking goal shots are all part of learning to play. Each colorful page is filled with large illustrations that will engage young children in the action-packed game of soccer. Problems with how a uniform fits, tight shoes, and falling add a true but humorous touch to the experience of young children learning the game of soccer. The first season ends with a winning score and the young players look forward to the next season.

Ashman writes in rhymes that add to the fun of reading aloud. Participatory reading is encouraged with the possibility of children taking the part of one of the characters and dramatizing the dialogue on each page. Ashman also emphasizes some words in colorful print that encourage dramatic reading. Kim Smith demonstrates her talent in illustrating the children with facial expressions that tell the feelings of excitement, fun, and some of the worries of playing.

"Hey, Coach!" is a winning combination of an introduction to soccer for young children, rhyming language in the text, and engaging brightly colored illustrations. It is published by Sterling Children's Books of New York and has an ISBN of 978-1-4549-1607-9.

"Hey, Coach!" soccer is exciting!

Colorful and fun read aloud picture book captures the fun of soccer
Colorful and fun read aloud picture book captures the fun of soccer | Source
Kim Smith, illustrator, provides engaging illustrations
Kim Smith, illustrator, provides engaging illustrations | Source
On the field
On the field | Source

Do you know your soccer terms?

Sports and young children

Sports participation by young children is a hot topic among parents, coaches, doctors who practice sports medicine, and pediatricians. Everyone has a story to tell about a game in which an overbearing parent or coach has demonstrated a lack of good sportsmanship. Parents and coaches have actually participated in physical violence. However, there is agreement among most parents and coaches that pushing too much takes the fun out of sports for children. Children are not natural competitors. They only want to learn the needed skills of playing a sport and have fun doing it. Most parents start their child in a sport with the idea of fun, but later thoughts of winning a championship or the possibility of a college scholarship enter into the picture and this changes the feel of games and sportsmanship. Some coaches also take the games too seriously and children feel the pressure from coaches to win. Pushing children in a sport can also produce physical injuries and concerns for later damage. Parents and coaches should be encouraged to consider the fun of games and sports as the principle idea to convey to children.

Fun, not competition, for children's sports

Exercise, the outdoors, and fun come with team sports
Exercise, the outdoors, and fun come with team sports

Children and sports are a source of learning good sportsmanship for life

Soccer tips for young children

Parents and coaches should consider several tips when teaching the basic skills of soccer or any game to young children. it is a good idea to keep the lessons and short and to focus on only one skill at a time. Explain the moves and skills orally and then follow up with a physical demonstration. Children had short attention spans and need many kinds of tools to learn the skills. Videos of famous soccer players are a great tool to use during a break from a lesson. it is also a good idea to remember that children readily understand the basic skills, but will not quickly understand strategy. Strategy comes later with children.

Favorite sports for young children

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