Songs and Verses That Invade Your Mind

The Mind Works in Mysterious Ways

Sometimes...no, often..my brain amazes me. Not by the brilliant ideas it comes up with, or by solving the most difficult problems on some Mensa test so I can boast an IQ of 130 (I wish), or something equally outlandish, but simply by what rises to the top of my memory for no apparent reason.

It could be some long thought forgotten childhood memory that some event or conversation seems to reignite in the mind. In this particular instance I am writing about songs, poems or verses that I heard as a child and that keep resurfacing requiring me to sing along or recite out loud, often to the surprise and embarrassment of my family and friends (and myself, because I am the world's worst singer).

I have only chosen the songs that are so vivid in my memory that I can actually remember most of the words. It is usually a struggle for me to remember just one verse or the chorus of a song (even if I like it). I know these songs really age me, but they are from among my very first musical memories. A few of you may be old enough to remember a couple of them as well, but I don't expect you to admit it :)

Source
Source

The Marvelous Toy

I have no idea when or where I first heard or read this song, just that I was a child at the time and it appealed to me. I kept imagining my father arriving home from a business trip or training course and present me with such a toy (he usually brought my mother and I a gift of some sort when he'd been away.. me usually a book).

When I started writing the hub I was going to ask if anyone recognised this or knew where it originated to please let me know in comments. However, before I did that I thought I should do a Google search first.

Well, voila! I found out that the song was made popular by none other than Peter, Paul and Mary who also sang one of my other favourite childhood songs "Puff the Magic Dragon". John Denver also did a great version and I had trouble choosing who's version to include in thi hub. I decided to find out who wrote the song and post that version.

The fact that I knew John Denver had actually written "Leaving on a Jet Plane" which Peter, Paul and Mary had a major hit with had me suspecting that maybe he had written "the Marvelous Toy" as well. However, my searching soon uncovered the truth! The song, was written and first performed by a guy called Tom Paxton. I think it only fair I include his version here.

"Tom paxton concert" by Kirobaito at English Wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons.. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons -
"Tom paxton concert" by Kirobaito at English Wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons.. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons - | Source

Thomas Richard "Tom" Paxton (born October 31, 1937) is an American folk singer-songwriter whose music career spans more than fifty years. In 2009, Tom Paxton received a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

Paxton's songs have enduring appeal, including modern standards such as "The Last Thing on My Mind", "Bottle of Wine", "Whose Garden Was This", "The Marvelous Toy", and "Ramblin' Boy". Paxton's songs have been recorded by some of the music industry's most accomplished singers including: Pete Seeger, Bob Dylan, Simon and Garfunkel, Johnny Cash, Judy Collins, Joan Baez, Doc Watson, Harry Belafonte, Peter, Paul and Mary, The Seekers, Marianne Faithfull, The Kingston Trio, John Denver, Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner, Willie Nelson, Flatt & Scruggs, Val Doonican, Daniel O'Donnell, Pat Boone, Ann Murray, Chris de Burgh, Nora Jones, Neil Diamond, Charlie Pride, and the list is almost endless.

He has performed thousands of concerts around the world and is still performing.

(for more of Tom Paxton's amazing career please see: https://en.wikipedia.org/Tom_Paxton)

The Marvelous Toy

by Tom Paxton

When I was just a wee little lad,
Full of health and joy,
My father homeward came one night
And gave to me a toy.
A wonder to behold it was
With many colors bright
And the moment I laid eyes on it,
It became my heart's delight.

Refrain:
It went "Zip" when it moved, and "Bop" when it stopped,
And "Whirrr" when it stood still.
I never knew just what it was and I guess I never will.

The first time that I picked it up
I had a big surprise
Cause right on the bottom were two big buttons
That looked like big green eyes
I first pushed one and then the other,
Then I twisted it's lid
And when I set it down again, here is what it did:

(Refrain)

It first marched left, and then marched right
And then marched under a chair
And when I looked where it had gone
It wasn't even there
I started to cry, but my daddy laughed
'Cause he knew that I would find,
When I turned around my marvelous toy
Would be chugging from behind.

(Refrain)

The years have gone by too quickly it seems,
I have my own little boy
And yesterday I gave to him
My marvelous little toy:
His eyes nearly popped right out of his head
And he gave a squeal of glee!
Neither one of us knows just what it is
But he loves it just like me!

It still goes... (refrain)

Source

I think I first heard this song being sung by my mother as a form of lullaby to put me to sleep, and it stuck with me. The first version I heard performed by a professional singer was by "The Seekers".

The Gypsy Rover
The Gypsy Rover | Source

The Gypsy Rover

by Leo Maguire

Whistling Gypsy came over the hill
Down thru the valley so shady
He whistled and he sang
Till the greenwood rang
And he won the heart of a lady

A dee do a dee do die day
A dee do a dee day-o
He whistled and he sang
Till the greenwood rang
And he won the heart of a lady

She left her father's castle gate
She left her fair young lover
She left her servants
And her estate
To follow the gypsy rover

A dee do a dee do die day
A dee do a dee day-o
She left her servants
And her estate
To follow the gypsy rover.

→ → → → → → → → →

(These next four stanzas are new to me or I had forgotten)

She left behind her velvet gown
And shoes of Spanish leather
They whistled and they sang
Till the greenwood rang
As they rode off together

A dee do a dee do die day
A dee do a dee day-o
They whistled and they sang
Till the greenwood rang
As they rode off together

Last night she slept on a goose feather bed
With silken sheets for cover
Tonight she sleeps
On the cold cold ground
Beside her gypsy lover

A dee do a dee do die day
A dee do a dee day-o
Tonight she sleeps
On the cold cold ground
Beside her gypsy lover

← ← ← ← ← ← ← ← ←

History of the Gypsy Rover

The Gypsy Rover, or The Whistling Gypsy is a well-known ballad of unknown origin but composed and copyrighted by Dublin songwriter Leo Maguire in the 1950s.

There are a number of similar traditional songs about a genteel woman's encounter with Gypsies dating back at least as far as the early 19th century. The story-line usually revolves around a woman leaving her home to run off with a Gypsy or Gypsies, only to be pursued by her husband.

Dorothy Scarborough's 1937 book A Song Catcher In Southern Mountains: American Folk Songs of British Ancestry includes a lullaby called "Gypsy Davy", and has a similar construction to Maguire's song, both in some of the lyrics in the verses and in the "ah dee do" chorus. The difference in Maguire's song is that the lady is pursued by her father.

Apart from The Seekers the song has been recorded by numerous artists, including The Clancy Brothers, The Kingston Trio, The Highwaymen Glenn Yarbrough, Foster & Allen, and The Wiggles, and Gypsy Davy by Bob Dylan. (source: Wikipedia)

Her father saddled up his fastest steed
And roamed the valleys all over
Sought his daughter
At great speed
And the whistling gypsy rover

A dee do a dee do die day
A dee do a dee day-o
Sought his daughter
At great speed
And the whistling gypsy rover

He came at last to a mansion fine
Down by the river Claydee
And there was music
And there was wine
For the gypsy and his lady

A dee do a dee do die day
A dee do a dee day-o
And there was music
And there was wine
For the gypsy and his lady

"He is no gypsy my father" she said
"But lord of these lands all over
And I shall stay
'til my dying day
With my whistling gypsy rover"

A dee do a dee do die day
A dee do a dee day-o
And I shall stay
'til my dying day
With my whistling gypsy rover"

Source

The next on my list of songs and verses that invaded my mind is the well known folk song "Tom Dooley". I can't even remember when I first heard this, and it isn't even a pleasant theme as it is based on a murder and hanging. I must admit that the tune is catchy though.

Thomas Caleb Tom Dooley Dula (June 22, 1845 – May 1, 1868)
Thomas Caleb Tom Dooley Dula (June 22, 1845 – May 1, 1868) | Source

History of Tom Dooley

The song is based on the 1866 murder of a woman named Laura Foster in Wilkes County, North Carolina, purportedly by Tom Dula, a former Confederate soldier.

It is best known today because of a hit version recorded in 1958 by The Kingston Trio which reached No.1 in both the Billboard and the Billboard R&B listing. It was also listed in the Cashbox Country Music Top 20. It fits within the wider genre of Appalachian "sweetheart murder ballads".

The song was selected as one of the American Songs of the Century by the Recording Industry Association of America(RIAA), and the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time.It was first sung by G. B. Grayson and Henry Whitter and has since been covered by a host of artists including Neil Young, Lonnie Donegan, and Doc Watson. (source: Wikipedia)

Col J.W.M. Grayson finally had to use his pistol to keep the group from NC from lynching Dula on the spot when he was found and captured in Tennessee.
Col J.W.M. Grayson finally had to use his pistol to keep the group from NC from lynching Dula on the spot when he was found and captured in Tennessee. | Source

Tom Dooley

by Thomas Land

Hang down your head, Tom Dooley
Hang down your head and cry
Hang down your head, Tom Dooley
Poor boy, you're bound to die
I met her on the mountain
There I took her life
Met her on the mountain
Stabbed her with my knife

Hang down your head, Tom Dooley
Hang down your head and cry
Hang down your head, Tom Dooley
Poor boy, you're bound to die

This time tomorrow
Reckon where I'll be
Hadn't a-been for Grayson
I'd a-been in Tennessee

Hang down your head, Tom Dooley
Hang down your head and cry
Hang down your head, Tom Dooley
Poor boy, you're bound to die

(repeat chorus)

This time tomorrow
Reckon where I'll be
Down in some lonesome valley
Hangin' from a white oak tree

(repeat chorus twice)

Drovers on the Brinkworth cattle drive
Drovers on the Brinkworth cattle drive | Source

History of Queensland Overlander

The final song that has stuck in my mind for many years, despite rarely ever hearing it since my school days is "Queensland Overlander (The Overlander)". It was included in one of our songbooks as part of our music classes in about 5th grade. Myself and two friends chose this song to perform as a trio at a school concert (the only way my singing is passable is as part of a group). The tune still pops into my head, unexplained, to this day.

The songs and music that has come from people's experiences of living and surviving in the Australian bush has become known in Australia as 'bush music'. Bush songs have been devised by ordinary everyday people and are a record of the colourful slang of bush life.

The convict songs of the early days of the Australian colonies became the foundation of Australia's bush music. Bush ballads recorded the harsh way of the life and contemporary events and experiences; the lives and loves of bushrangers, swagmen, drovers, and shearers.

After the gold rushes, shearers and drovers composed ballads and songs which became part of the oral tradition of Australian bush music. Stockmen and drovers, known as 'overlanders', were proud of the skills required to drive sheep and cattle over long distances and this is expressed in many of their ballads and songs

The Overlanders has been in circulation in a number of versions for over 100 years. The earliest surviving one was around in the 1840s and published in the Queensland Camp Fire Song Book in 1865. (source: www.australia.gov.au)

Queensland Overlander

by Phillip "Remos" Somer

There's a trade you all know well,
It's bringing cattle over.
On ev'ry track,
To the Gulf and back,
Men know the Queensland drover.

CHORUS:
Pass the billy 'round boys!
Don't let the pint-pot stand there!
For tonight we drink the health
Of every overlander.

I come from the northern plains
Where the girls and grass are scanty;
Where the creeks run dry
Or ten foot high
And it's either drought or plenty.

There are men from every land,
From Spain and France and Flanders;
They're a well-mixed pack,
Both white and black,
The Queensland overlanders.:

When we've earned a spree in town
We live like pigs in clover;
And the whole year's cheque
Pours down the neck
Of many a Queensland drover.

As I pass along the roads,
The children raise my dander
Crying "Mother dear,
Take in the clothes,
Here comes the overlander!":

Now I'm bound for home once more,
On a prad that's quite a goer;
I can find a job
With a crawling mob
On the banks of the Maranoa.

Drovers (overlanders) camping under some trees at Hughenden, Queensland. Boxes, buckets and other gear are spread out upon the ground. Dogs shelter under the loaded dray.
Drovers (overlanders) camping under some trees at Hughenden, Queensland. Boxes, buckets and other gear are spread out upon the ground. Dogs shelter under the loaded dray. | Source

© 2015 John Hansen

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Comments 67 comments

Frank Atanacio profile image

Frank Atanacio 12 months ago from Shelton

camp fire songs in poetic form.. only you can make us sing along Jodah.. love the concept too voted awesome


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for being the first to sing along Frank, and the vote up. Cheers.


annart profile image

annart 12 months ago from SW England

I know all these except the last and I was singing away merrily!

The Marvellous Toy was sung here by Val Doonican, a popular Irish singer at the time who has only recently died. He had a lovely voice (bit like Jim Reeves') and was a kind man.

Thanks for the ride down memory lane, John.

Ann


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 12 months ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

Hello John. What a warm friendly presentation. You with apparent ease rolled back time. This will set many a reader's day along the right path. It now feels like Friday.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for reading Ann. I remember Val Doonican well. He was a wonderful singer and I even remember the show he used to have on TV. I even mentioned him among the artists who sang songs written by Tom Paxton. Glad I had you singing away down memory lane.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Mike, thanks for going along on a little travel back in time with me today. I hope other readers enjoy it too. Have a great one.


lambservant profile image

lambservant 12 months ago from Pacific Northwest

This was very well put together and very interesting. Nice work.


billybuc profile image

billybuc 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

I wonder how many people remember Tom Paxton. I do...like you said, the mind is a wondrous thing at times. What a great look into the creative process, brought to us by your very creative mind. Great read, John!


clivewilliams profile image

clivewilliams 12 months ago from Nibiru

love the Tom Paxton toy song...zip and bop brrrr when it stood still...nice hub jodah


Dana Tate profile image

Dana Tate 12 months ago from LOS ANGELES

The pictures on this hub are amazing. I know what you mean about the riddles in your head that won't go away. I have a few repetitiously going on and on until I start singing them out loud; then I glance around and pray no- one heard me. At least the songs are motivating. Another great hub Jodah.


Carb Diva profile image

Carb Diva 12 months ago

Amazing, puzzling, and sometimes bewildering how our minds work, where these little thoughts come from (and why they were stored in the first place). Love the photos you selected to go with this hub. Great hub, and for the better part of the afternoon I will have Tom Dooley stuck in my head.


annart profile image

annart 12 months ago from SW England

Sorry! Missed his name in your list. Tom Paxton was pretty prolific wasn't he? Bit like Neil Diamond who wrote so many hits for so many.

Hope your week's going well, John.

Ann


manatita44 profile image

manatita44 12 months ago from london

Tom Dooley; Leaving on a Jet Plane. These are immortal songs. I sang them so many times. Lots of sweet and charming verses here and great ballads. Wonderful writers. Well done and a great Hub!


Marion Drury profile image

Marion Drury 12 months ago from Sydney, Australia

Oh my goodness! Talk about stirring up memories. This takes me way back to my childhood. Haven't thought of any or these songs for years. Now I'm sure I shall be humming these melodies in my head throughout the day. Thanks again Jodah for a great Hub.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Lori, thanks for reading. Hope all's going well with you.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Bill, I have to admit I had forgotten Tom Paxton until I wrote this. I obviously remembered his songs which have been sung by so many other artists but it's sad that I couldn't recall the actual man who is a great entertainer and still performing in his late 70s. Thanks for reading as always.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks Clive. Yes I love that toy song too. We must be kids at heart.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks Dana. After I published this another four or five songs came to mind as well. I am sure your voice is better than mine :)


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hey Carb Diva, thank you for the great comment. Yes it is amazing what sticks in the mind. Glad you liked the photos, and long live Tom Dooley :) (through song anyway)


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Manatita, thank you for reading and commenting. It is good to remember the songs from yesteryear.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Marion, glad I stirred up some childhood memories. Being a fellow Aussie you may even remember The Queensland Overlander.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

All good. Thanks Ann.


MsDora profile image

MsDora 12 months ago from The Caribbean

I listened to the Marvelous Toy and totally enjoyed it. Thanks for sharing these beautiful lyrics and sounds from your childhood. I bet they influenced your poetic ability.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 12 months ago from southern USA

Hi John,

It is always surprising to me that out of the blue for no apparent reason, an old song will pop into my head and I will begin to sing it out loud. It is so much fun to me for I never thought I would remember such until it just pops right back into my memory. Our brains are truly amazing.

Thank you for sharing the songs that creep into your mind. I do remember Tom Dooley well!

I can't even imagine a world without music and don't want to do so.

Peace and blessings always


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

MsDora, happy to hear that you enjoyed The Marvelous Toy. I certainly think they may have influenced me to write and enjoy poetry.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Yes Faith, tunes and words just seem to appear suddenly from nowhere.. songs you aven't even thought about in years. They obviously ad a positive influence on us when we first heard them. Another I just had pop into my head is "song Sung Blue" by Neil Diamond...it would be a much duller world without music. Blessings back.


suraj punjabi profile image

suraj punjabi 12 months ago from jakarta

Yes this happens to me too. But mostly the songs that pops into my head are the songs that I have hear recently. Rarely does a song that I have heard years ago comes to my mind. Now that I have a 1 year old daughter I am constantly surrounded by children songs like twinkly twinkle little star and itsy bitsy spider, very often I find my self singing the verses of those songs. Great Hub!


DDE profile image

DDE 12 months ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

Interesting and so true! Songs feed the mind positive energy. I like listening to songs from all times.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Suraj, thanks for reading and commenting. Often current songs that I hear a lot get stuck in my mind, but that is usually only for a short time. Certain songs that had an impact on my life or happened at a particular time are the ones that reoccur years later.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Devika, that is so true. I listen to all types of music, new and old.


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 12 months ago from New York

Thank you for taking us on your journey John. I hope you know I'll be singing Tom Dooley all day now.

I had forgotten The Marvelous Toy but will certainly remember it now. It is amazing how we associate certain songs with certain times in our lives, I guess that's what gives them the special feeling we feel when we hear them.


ocfireflies profile image

ocfireflies 12 months ago from North Carolina

John,

What a wonderful journey listening to the songs and memories you provide here, but you really hit a chord(sorry, I couldn't help myself : )

when you included "Tom Dooley" for I have a very close connection to this one. Willkes County borders the county I live in so close to home geographically, but also from a family connection: My great (not sure how many generations) grandmother gave Laura her wedding dress and was given a lock of Laura's hair. Not sure which family member still has it. In addition, my grandmother's husband at the time was sheriff in Wilkes County at the time, and he with others, was the one who brought Tom pronounced around here "Dula" in for supposedly murdering Laura Foster. Thus, needless to say, as always, dear friend, YOU MADE MY DAY!

Blessings,

Kim


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Wow! Kim, what a fascinating piece of history you are connected to. When researching the song I learnt a lot of additional facts I didn't know. I am sure you can fill me in on more. So glad I made your day. Blessings.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Mary, thank you for the great comment. Songs help us remember these special times. Have fun singing Tom Dooley. Cheers.


bravewarrior profile image

bravewarrior 12 months ago from Central Florida

I really enjoyed this musical trip through your memory banks, John. Can you believe I've never heard any of them? That amazes me because you and I are the same age (I think I may be a few months older).

The last one is a real toe stompin' catchy tune. I can see why it still pops in your head from time to time.

A couple of songs from my childhood that pop into my mind and out of my mouth are "Daisy" (Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer true. I half crazy over the love of you. It won't be a stylish marriage - I can't afford a carriage. But you'll look sweet upon the seat of a bicycle built for two.) and "Maresy Dotes" (Maresy dotes and doesey dotes and little amsydivey. A kiddley divey too, wouldn't you?) The latter translates to:

Mares eat oats and does eat oats and little lambs eat ivy. A kid will eat ivey, too. Wouldn't you?

Great hub, John. I so enjoyed this!


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Shauna, I am amazed that you hadn't at least heard Tom Dooley and The Gypsy Rover. I do remember Daisy, Daisy and Maresy Dotes. My mother used to sing them. Glad you enjoyed this hub.


Missy Smith profile image

Missy Smith 12 months ago from Florida

Hey Jodah...so first off, I don't know many of these songs, but I would admit it for sure. I love all types of music, even older music. The first song was really silly and fun. I think any child would love to listen to that today. Heck, I smiled all the way through it. He mentioned Peter, Paul, and Mary, and I do know their music. This was a charming little song. :)

The Gypsy Rover was a simple folk song, but it made me sway back and forth while listening to the gypsy tune. I tell you if I came across a gypsy who looked like the one you posted in the first picture, I'm jumping on his caravan. Just saying. lol.

Guess what? I know that Tom Dooley tune. See, I told you I would admit it. I actually remember my mom singing this one to us girls when we were kids. Now that I read what the song is all about, it seems a bit strange she would sing that to us in an upbeat manner. lol...I suppose I didn't pay attention to the words or her explanation to that song, as I'm sure she probably told us the story behind it too. It would make sense why she knew that one so well. She was born in 1950, and she was raised in the Georgia mountains. :)

Queensland Overlander was interesting. I could definitely picture a group of people sitting around the campfire singing and slapping a knee to that one.

I enjoyed this hub Jodah. Thanks for sharing your songs and memories.


drbj profile image

drbj 12 months ago from south Florida

Thanks for sharing your favorite musical memories, Jodah. I'm familiar with the Tom Dooley song but not the others. Though now that I've read this charming hub, I know I'll be humming it for days: 'Hang down your head, Tom Dooley ... '


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 12 months ago

John, what a delight to read this. Yes, I know "Puff the Magic Dragon."

I know "1 hen, 2 ducks, 3 squawking geese." I know one song I can't even spell the title, but it starts "Dad went out in the Ford machine, dropped a match in the gasoline, blew him so high he has never been seen, and the rest I can say it but can't spell it. Then there is the Lady who swallowed a fly.

And a nursery rhyme my mom to sing to me was the "Three Little Fishes." Then there was a poem called the 10 cent can of paint. I would hear my mom read it and laugh until I was crying.

The poem

10 Cent Can of Paint

Mister Cress, I got complaint about a 10 cent of Paint

My wife she buy from your d**mn store

and now by cripes I'm good and sore

My she always clean and neat

she buy this paint for toilet seat

for one whole week we watch with eye

but that d**n paint no get dry

for one whole week we watch and wait

and now we all go constipate.

Another one that I love is "I'm my own grandpa"

Oh my John, you sure have the wheels turning now.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hey Missy, thank you for that great comment. Tom Dooley seems to be the most widely known of the songs I selected, probably because it is an American folk song and based on true events. The Gypsy Rover is Irish or Celtic, and Queensland Overlander of course is Australian. The Marvelous Toy is just a fun song that I enjoyed as a kid and I still do. I am sure you have certain songs from your childhood that invade your mind too. Thanks for reading, glad you enjoyed.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Greetings drbj, I guess it's good to hear about songs that influence others in some way even if you aren't familiar with them. Have fun humming "Tom Dooley" for the next few days.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hello Shyron, thanks for the interesting comment. The only song/nursery rhymes you mentioned that I know is "Three Little Fishes," and the Little Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly" though "10 Cent Can of Paint" was a lot of fun. Glad I got your wheels turning.


Larry Rankin profile image

Larry Rankin 12 months ago from Oklahoma

Wonderful collection.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks Larry...oldies but goodies I think.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 12 months ago from The Beautiful South

Such a fun hub, John! My husband and I were just discussing yesterday how we get a tune on the brain and sometimes it can about drive you crazy when it just won't go away!


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hey Jackie, I can so relate to that as you see by this hub. It happens to me constantly. Thank for commenting, glad you had fun reading this.


Mel Carriere profile image

Mel Carriere 12 months ago from San Diego California

Whenever I'm feeling blue

I crank up a sweetheart murder ballad or two

And it helps me to get through

Whatever nagging my wife says is her due

The brain is a giant I pod that is always on shuffle mode. I find these incongrous songs popping into my head all the time too and I have to sing them, to the chagrin of my wife and kids. You have introduced me to a fascinating new genre here. Only in Appalachia. Great hub!


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hey Mel, thanks for popping by my hub..like the songs in my head :)

Thanks for the humorous verse too. My singing is also the chagrin of my dear wife.


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 12 months ago from England

lol! I had never heard of the Marvelous Toy before! but what a great song! I do know the others, but of course not the last one. What a great list! funnily enough the Seekers is one of my 'brain songs' too. The Carnival! its a song my gran and mum used to sing when I was tiny, all the words have stuck in my mind now! great hub! nell


Jodah profile image

Jodah 12 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Nell, glad you enjoyed this hub. Yes, The MarvelousToy is a great song. "The Carnival Is Over" is probably the Seekers song you refer to. It's one of my favourites too along with "Morning Town Ride"..another sticker. Thanks for reading.


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 11 months ago from Stillwater, OK

Some of these really bring back memories of where I was and what I was doing while listening to a few of these. Thanks for the memories. Wow, we've really been around for a while, haven't we?


Jodah profile image

Jodah 11 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

haha Deb, yes these are a bit of a givaway as to how long I have been around. My excuse is that I heard them from my parents :) Glad they brought back memories for you.


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pstraubie48 11 months ago from sunny Florida

Our brain truly is wondrous, mysterious place that will find that song or verse or quote we may not even realize is secreted away ....I do so agree with you.

I love the way you found to connect the songs to other parts of your memory..how clever.

And, O, yes, Tom Dooley...how many times I sang that over and over and over.

Great hub

Angels are once again on the way to you ps shared g+ tweeted pinned to Awesome HubPages.


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Jodah 11 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hello again ps, thank you for visiting another of my hubs. I give up trying to understand where some of my ideas for hubs come from, but I like to surprise myself :) thanks for the great comment, the angels, and the share and pin.


Anne Harrison profile image

Anne Harrison 11 months ago from Australia

So many memories - what an interesting idea for a hub! Puff The Magic Dragon was one of my favourites, despite its inherent sadness. Thanks for sharing


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Jodah 11 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Anne, thank you very much for the kind comment. Yes, I loved Puff the Magic Dragon as well, and almost included it here. It was very sad as you say.


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lawrence01 11 months ago from Hamilton, New Zealand

John

These brought back a few memories! Some great songs here.

Lawrence


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Jodah 11 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you Lawrence, always good to refresh other people's memories as well.


Jo_Goldsmith11 profile image

Jo_Goldsmith11 11 months ago

It was so cool that you started this informative article with Hendrix. A favorite of mine. Actually the hubby has a couple t-shirts of his. The others and the songs are new to me. Interesting stuff! Just love your imagination! :-) "Keep the wheels turning"..roll with it, John! :-)

Shared, up she goes...


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Jodah 11 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hey again Jo, thanks for checking out this hub. Yes, I have had that Jimi Hendrix quote for awhile, just looking for a suitable place to use it. Glad you and your hubby are a fan of his, and that I could also introduce you to some songs you weren't familiar with. Thanks for the share etc.


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 11 months ago from USA

I remember Tom Dooley. Didn't know that there was an Appalachian sweetheart murder ballad genre but you know that might make a great hub there, John.


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Jodah 11 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for reading Flourish. Yes that may be a genre that has very little competition "Appalachian Sweetheart Murder Ballad"..has a ring to it.


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dahoglund 11 months ago from Wisconsin Rapids

My memories date back to being a kid during WWII. Spike Jones had satirical songs about Hitler such as "Der Furher says, his is the master race"

There were military songs I remember from when we went to the railroad depot to see my brother off to his Navy base. One was called "pack up your troubles."

There were also songs that children made up that were catchy but the meanings escape me.


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Jodah 11 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Don, I remember "Pack up your troubles in your old kit bag and smile, smile, smile." Thank for commenting.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 11 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Don, I remember "Pack up your troubles in your old kit bag and smile, smile, smile." Thank for commenting.


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Greensleeves Hubs 5 days ago from Essex, UK

John, I'm so glad you visited a forum post of mine - it led me directly back to this hub of yours, some fond memories, and the realisation that we have at least some musical reminiscences in common. I love traditional folk, but also much folk composed in the 20th century, and three of these four songs and/or their artists mean something to me.

1) Peter, Paul and Mary AND John Denver are among my favourite singers, and even though my record collection is limited, their CDs feature several times. 'The Marvelous Toy' is on one by Peter, Paul and Mary, and I just played it for the first time in a few years! A charming fun song I really love. But the video recording you present by Tom Paxton, and which I played immediately afterwards, is also charming. Good to know that Tom - a folk legend - is still with us, and according to Wikipedia released a new album in 2015!

2) Same as the artists mentioned above, the Seekers were favourites of mine when I was a teenager in the 1970s (not very fashionable by that time, when all my friends were into rock and I was playing 60s folk! Again, I have the 'Gypsy Rover' on a Seekers CD.

3) As for 'Tom Dooley', I've probably only heard that played professionally a handful of times ever, but it was one of the songs my father would frequently sing or hum when I was a little child in the 60s. I shall have to get a recording - fond memories!

4) I must admit I don't know the 'Queensland Overlander' or the singer who performs it in the video, but needless to say, I like his rendition.

Can I say, I do think one reason some of the older songs - those of 100 plus years old - stick in the memory is because they tended to be fairly simple in structure, and relied upon melodies which also had to be very strong and very memorable, because they could only be passed on person to person in the days before commercial production of records. Simple - but beautiful.

Thanks for the wonderful reminiscences John - both yours and mine!! :) I will share.


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Jodah 5 days ago from Queensland Australia Author

Alun, thank you for reading and the wonderful comment that actually adds value to this article. It does seem we have a lot in common as far as musical tastes are concerned. I think you are right about why many of the old songs stick in the memory, and that there were no recordings at the time and they needed to be catchy and easy to remember to be passed down orally. Glad these brought back fond reminiscing.

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    John Hansen (Jodah)686 Followers
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    John is a movie and music lover. He is especially interested in classic movies, cinema and music and related trivia.



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