Take a Word.... CUT: Etymology, Idioms & Phrases; Poems & the Story of the Cutty Sark

A Child Plays with Letters & Words

Choose the Shape of your Letters and the Colour of your Words
Choose the Shape of your Letters and the Colour of your Words | Source

Playing with Words

I’m enjoying taking one word at a time on a whim, exploring its origins and its various uses. As I child I loved playing with letters to see what words I could make. As a wordsmith, I like to play with, manipulate, juxtapose and weave words, to see how many pictures can be made with these literary jigsaw pieces.

Finding out about idioms, or phrases and sayings, can lead to juggling words to create new meanings, new pictures. Knowing the established idioms, we can try making up our own along similar lines, creating new language as we go, evolving with these words that make up our wonderful English tongue.

By ‘English’ I mean all the versions thereof which exist - in Britain, in Australia and New Zealand, in the US and Canada, in many places around the world where the language has evolved into all its different facets, each a shining surface contributing to the whole diamond, our gem of a language.


Cut me a slice please!

In France you cut the bread with 'un couteau'.
In France you cut the bread with 'un couteau'. | Source
'Ouch!  There's a cut on my toe.'
'Ouch! There's a cut on my toe.' | Source

Etymology of 'cut'

www.etymonline.com tells us that cut (as a verb) comes from ‘late 13th century, possibly Scandinavian, from North Germanic kut (cognates: Swedish dialectal kuta ‘to cut’, kuta ‘knife’, Old Norse kuti ‘knife’), or from Old French couteau ‘knife’’. It replaced the Old English ceorfan (carve), sniban and scieran (shear). The meaning ‘to be absent without excuse’ is British university slang from 1794. To cut a pack of cards is from the 1590s.' (The French for ‘knife’, couteau, still exists.)

cut (as a noun) comes from the 1520s for a ‘gash, incision’, from the verb cut. The meaning of a ‘piece cut off’ is from 1590s and as a sense of ‘a wounding sarcasm’ is from 1560s.

A slightly different derivative is explained by https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ , cut being from Middle English ‘cutten, kitten, kytten, ketten’ (to cut), from Proto-Germanic ‘kutjana, kuttana’ (to cut), of uncertain origin, perhaps related to ‘kwetwa’ (meat, flesh). Also Old Norse ‘kuti’ (small knife), Norweigan ‘kyttel, kytel, kjutul’ (pointed slip of wood used to strip bark).

You get the drift; you can see the overall pattern.


Idioms & Sayings

We all know that the basic idea of ‘cut’ as a verb (a doing word) is to make a clean break through material or through flesh with scissors or a knife. You can cut your own finger by accident, on a knife or the edge of paper (a particular horror of mine) or on a plant such as a thorn or sharp blade of grass. Thus you have a cut, the noun (object), on your hand.

To cut and paste is a well-known phrase; those of us with computers and the like often cut a piece of text, move it elsewhere and paste it where we feel it belongs best.

There exists, however, a vast list of sayings which derive from ‘cut’, most of which you will know; some might be less obvious, some might entertain, some might inform. I have come up with the list below which is by no means exhaustive so I’d be pleased if you would add, in the comments section below, others that you know, especially those used in a particular dialect, region or country.

Also, no doubt there are obvious phrases which I’ve overlooked, so put me straight!


A Poem

‘Cut’ is a short word; to me it implies a speed of action and indeed many of the idioms refer to just that. So it seemed apt to put them into what I hope is a fast-paced poem. Here goes.


Can you Cut It?

He cut a fine figure
He cut a fine figure | Source
What did you say?!  What's wrong with my haircut?'
What did you say?! What's wrong with my haircut?' | Source
That's cutting it a bit fine, we start at quarter past!
That's cutting it a bit fine, we start at quarter past! | Source
The Cut of the Cloth - On the cross?  made to measure?
The Cut of the Cloth - On the cross? made to measure? | Source
Cutting the rug with a Jive! (the carpet would be cut up after vigorous dancing, espcially by a cowboy wearing stirrups in a square dance!)
Cutting the rug with a Jive! (the carpet would be cut up after vigorous dancing, espcially by a cowboy wearing stirrups in a square dance!) | Source

Explanation of 'cut to the chase'

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings tells us that ‘the phrase originated in the US film industry. Many early silent films ended in chase sequences preceded by obligatory romantic storylines. The first reference to it dates back to that era, just after the first ‘talkie’, The Jazz Singer in 1927. It is a script direction from Joseph Patrick McEvoy’s novel Hollywood Girl, 1929:

‘Jannings escapes... Cut to chase’

Several later references take the slight change of meaning to a sense of missing out all the unnecessary bits and getting to the interesting part, such as all the action movies where the chase is the part everyone’s waiting for.


Cutting the Rug

Shorty lived by the cut,

offshoot of a canal.

He cut a fine figure but puffed out his chest,

thought himself a cut above the rest,

until they cut him down to size,

told him he wasn’t such a prize.


He couldn’t cut it when at school,

cut his classes, played the fool.

They told him he was stupid, thick,

comments cut him to the quick.

They laughed at his haircut. He said, ‘Cut it out!

Cut me some slack! Just stop it!’ he’d shout.


Taking a short cut to town one day,

a sign ‘Join our Club’ drew his eye, made him stay.

He cut to the chase, made a vow to himself,

‘I’ll work hard at that, it’s good for my health.

Despite the derision this might cut me free.

It could make them stop, look at me differently.’


Shorty cut it fine each day at the door;

it all kicked off at a quarter past four.

He couldn’t be late or he’d lose his position.

He’d saved his money. He’d make them listen.

The cut of the cloth of his new suit was fine,

helping his chances to reach the big time.


Then they’d be sorry, they’d cut him some slack.

He wouldn’t be cut out, they’d welcome him back.

So clean cut and carefree, that boy took a chance;

he’d been to some classes, yes, but to dance!

To cut a long story short, he’d got the bug

and Shorty could move, he could twirl, he could hug.


They all watched him down at the Roxy that night.

The whole situation was clear cut alright.

Shorty had won all the hearts of the girls,

the short ones, the tall ones, the ones with dark curls.

His jive was the best, he could cut such a caper,

no one could cut in, no way she’d be safer.


He was cutting edge, he cut the mustard,

they called him the cream on top of the custard.

All he’d ever wanted was some recognition,

to feel some respect, to be in that position.

The dances were done for that night, he was rapt

when all his old enemies stood round and clapped.


He’d made it, he’d taken his cut and felt good,

he’d cut loose and wow was he glad, now he could

move to the rhythm, cut the pack, throw the dice,

come up trumps every time, boy! that felt nice.

The freedom, the fun, the glide and the tug

put him way up there when cutting the rug!


But wait! There's more!

I couldn’t quite get all I wanted into that little ditty, so we’re continuing by way of a nautical theme.

A tenuous link to the word ‘cut’ is the ship’s name ‘Cutty Sark’. The rhythm and swell of the waves lends itself to poetry, so off we sail again...


Cutting here & cutting there

A different way to cut through the waves - water paddling off Brighton!
A different way to cut through the waves - water paddling off Brighton! | Source
Cut through, take a short cut
Cut through, take a short cut | Source
British Cuts of Meat
British Cuts of Meat | Source
Every event, or new building, should be opened by cutting the red ribbon
Every event, or new building, should be opened by cutting the red ribbon
Nannie, figurehead of the Cutty Sark, wearing her 'cutty sark'
Nannie, figurehead of the Cutty Sark, wearing her 'cutty sark' | Source

The Cutty Sark

Cutting through the waves, with sails billowed full,

All hands on deck, all ready to pull

at the ropes, hold her fast, try to keep steady.

Those winds howling round made the young man feel heady.


Tom’s father had sailed these same seas many a time

but had fallen, perished, drowned, been cut off in his prime.

The son did oft wonder, a tear in his eye,

Why fate was so cruel, why his Pa had to die.


He’d been in a bar when they’d come in to find

fine young lads for their crew. When they had a mind

there was no one could stop them, or they’d be cut down.

On that day young Tom stared at them, with a frown.


You could cut the air with a knife, it hung heavy

with bad breath and b.o.* and anger, no levy

did those old tars take, nor excuse nor appeasement;

they’d do as they wished or to hell all were sent.


But our lad was strong; he’d had grief to give courage.

That first cut the deepest, not easy at his age,

but nothing was worse than the loss of his Pa;

cut from the same cloth, this lad would go far.


Seeing his chance to escape through the back,

with a bound he was gone, not a sign, not a crack

of shoe upon stone, as he cut across alleys,

finding his way to the docks, to the galleys.


‘Twas there that he joined up as ship’s kitchen boy,

on that ‘Cutty Sark’ where his father did toil.

He cooked cuts of meat, his dishes were tasty,

he stirred up his plot as he kneaded the pastry.


These were the sailors his father had served with,

the ones he held guilty of murder and theft;

murder because they had not stopped him fall,

theft because now he’d no father at all.


Oblivious, they ate the fine stew laced with poison,

they choked and they flailed and they fell where he’d chosen,

over the rails where the sea’s swell did swallow,

Tom’s faithful father for ever they’d follow.


Later, much later, the years having flown,

Tom took to the land and made his own home,

was Mayor of the town, a good man to rely on,

“I declare this fête open”, proud to cut the red ribbon.


But he never forgot those bad days on that clip

when vengeance was his for the loss of kinship.

He wouldn’t set foot on a ship e’er again

For fear that his mind would cut loose and then.....


He knew Cutty Sark was no longer so fine,

her crew they had mutinied, jumped ship, cut the line,

the captain abandoned his ship for the deep,

unable his honour and duty to keep.


Tom wondered if he’d cut the mould, been the first

to darken the ship, been the herald of worse,

or was father’s death the death knoll for that skip,

cursed to be glorious no more, doomed and split.


(*b.o. - short for body odour)


Use your Imagination!

You’re allowed to cringe at some of the connivance of the rhymes above but it’s all in the name of experiment! Maybe some lines should have been left on the cutting room floor.

The point is, use your judgement, use your ingenuity, experiment and invent. Come up with your own verses, your own prose, your own phrases, paragraphs, stories and books. Make the cut of the words suit your own purpose.


Cutty Sark

The Tea Clipper
The Tea Clipper | Source

The Real Story of the Cutty Sark

‘Cutty Sark’ was a tea clipper, one of the fast sailing ships of the 19th century. The tea trade was very competitive and each voyage in Victorian times was a race to get back to port first, in order to obtain the highest price for the tea. The Cutty Sark was admired as one of the fastest.

Sadly, due to the increasing use of the more powerful and reliable steamships, these clippers fell into decline. In 1880 the Cutty Sark set off to deliver coal to Japan. The voyage was never completed.

‘A fight amongst the crew left one man dead, and when the man responsible was allowed to escape by the captain, the rest of the crew mutinied. The ship’s captain, realising his career was ruined, committed suicide by stepping off the ship’s stern into the sea. These dark events gave the Cutty Sark a new reputation amongst sailors, as a ‘hellship’ and a cursed vessel.’


Robbie Burns, Poet

Robert Burns who penned 'Tam O'Shanter'
Robert Burns who penned 'Tam O'Shanter' | Source

How the Cutty Sark got her Name

‘Cutty Sark’ comes from a famous poem, ‘Tam O’Shanter’ by Robert Burns, concerning a farmer (Tam) who is chased by a scantily-clad witch named ‘Nannie’. Nannie is dressed only in a ‘cutty sark’, an ancient Scottish name for a short nightdress or shirt. Nannie is depicted as the figurehead adorning the bow of the ‘Cutty Sark’.

Jock Willis, the original owner of the ship, chose her name. It was allegedly suggested by the ship’s designer, Hercules Linton, though is a strange choice for a ship as witches are supposedly unable to cross water.

So why did Jock select that particular name? Maybe because he was patriotic, choosing a name inspired by Scotland’s most famous poet. Another ship in his fleet was named ‘Halloween’, also the name of a Burns’ poem.

I have my own theory as to why. The name sounds jaunty, evokes the ‘cutting’ through the waves of a sharp prow. The wind would catch the sails as it would a skimpy petticoat! The cut and thrust atmosphere of such a time might have been something to do with it. Maybe Mr Willis just liked the sound of it; maybe he recognised a good word when he saw it. Maybe he was a writer too!


A Whisky a cut above the rest?

Cutty Sark Scots Whisky
Cutty Sark Scots Whisky | Source

Incidentally

‘Cutty Sark’ is also the name of an iconic whisky, as well as a pub in Greenwich, London (where the renovated ship is moored).

Now it's time for me to cut and run before I outstay my welcome.


Copyright annart/AFC 2015




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Comments 48 comments

annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Thank you, Lawrence.

Ann


lawrence01 profile image

lawrence01 14 months ago from Hamilton, New Zealand

Loved this hub.

Lawrence


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Thanks, Flourish! No more clever than you who can also juggle words and come up with all sorts. Glad you liked this! Thanks for the visit.

Ann


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 14 months ago from USA

Oh, cut it out! You're being so clever! Great hub!


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Hi teaches! Thanks for your witty comment; I never thought of that! Glad you like this and good to see you today.

Ann


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 14 months ago

I guess I own quite a few cutty sarks! I enjoyed your post and your quick writing wit.


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Thanks for the great comment, Mel; it really cuts the mustard! Glad you liked this.

Next time you cut to the whisky, you'll be able to tell everyone about the label - but will you cut to the chase or just cut a pretty picture under the table?

Hope you have a great week!

Ann


Mel Carriere profile image

Mel Carriere 14 months ago from San Diego California

This hub really cut to the quick. Sometimes when I go off on a wild writing tangent I tell myself to cut to the chase in order to get centered again. I loved your poem and I enjoyed reading about the Cutty Sark. All I've seen is the whiskey bottle, usually while tipped sideways, and I had no idea where the name came from. Cut it out already! Great hub!


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Hi Bronwen! I don't mind you being 'picky', as you put it, because I am generally the same. However, I always thought that an implied 'it' if one had already said it, was allowed. The alright is one I've adopted, I confess, much like 'already', though there is a difference with both of them isn't there? 'It was all ready. He was already there.' They were all right (i.e. corect). They were alright (ok/safe...).' It's a moot point where we draw the line and how much the language has already evolved. Some things I don't tolerate, some things I waver over, some things I embrace!

Thank you for your comments and do mention anything else you ever see in my ramblings; I never mind anyone questioning what I write.

Thank you for coming back to explain, Bronwen. Much appreciated.

Ann


BlossomSB profile image

BlossomSB 14 months ago from Victoria, Australia

Ann, I'm so sorry for being so picky, as it's really such a wonderful, clever hub and you have put so much thought and care into it. I know from experience how difficult it is to edit one's own writing and the others were even more insignificant. I wondered if you meant to write: 'Hercules Linton, though (it) is a strange choice' and the other is even less important, as everyone seems to write 'alright' these days. That shows how ancient I am, as we used to get into trouble at school if we didn't put 'all right.' Living languages change and I need to keep up with the times!


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Thanks, Eric; what lovely words! I'm so glad you liked this. It was such fun to do. I'm enjoying this series so I hope others are too so that I continue with it for a while longer.

Ann


Ericdierker profile image

Ericdierker 14 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

Let me cut to the chase, I just luv love Love it. How fun, entertaining and thought provoking. Thank you for cutting loose here.


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Thanks, R.Q. I love it when you grace my page. This one did take a while though it was great fun to do. Thank you for your lovely words and picking out a couple of lines; much appreciated.

France is still wet but nonetheless lovely! My best to you and yours.

Ann


Romeos Quill profile image

Romeos Quill 14 months ago from Lincolnshire, England

I'm sure glad I found this Hub by you Ann; engaging, entertaining and educational, all rolled into one and love verse that tells a story.

I like this phrase in particular you used to describe the English language:-

" ...in many places around the world where the language has evolved into all its different facets, each a shining surface contributing to the whole diamond, our gem of a language. "

This one must have taken you a while to compile and really appreciate the effort you put into - no wonder you're a teacher!

Thanks for the riveting write and have fun in beautiful France you lucky thang!

Best wishes to you and your nearest and dearest;

R.Q.


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Dora: Thank you for the great comment. Glad you liked the poems and the 'fun' element; it was great fun doing it but turned out to be a lot longer than anticipated - in words and in preparation!

Good to see you today.

Ann


MsDora profile image

MsDora 14 months ago from The Caribbean

The poems show real genius. Also appreciate the research on etymology, and idioms. A fun study. Thank you.


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

social thoughts: Sorry, I thought I'd responded to your comment but it doesn't seem to have been posted! Thanks for the lovely words; I'm glad you liked this and that the poems pleased you.

Ann


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

manatita: Thanks for the kind comment; good to know that the story kept to the theme.

Yes, I thought I'd better not include the rude ones, of which there are a few, as, like you, I don't care for swearing. However, they are part of the language so maybe I'm being prudish!

English is a great language with which to experiment so we're all lucky to have that rich rainbow of words at our disposal in order to create and show something of our souls.

Ann


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Thank you so much, Bronwen. Do you know, I thought when I wrote 'wrapped' that it wasn't correct, then when I looked it up a definition gave that meaning. I guess I wasn't looking in the right place because now you've mentioned it, I know 'rapt' is the correct spelling, as in 'rapture'. Thanks for bringing that to my notice. You said a couple - what else? I've changed one thing but you might have noticed others. One can proof-read 'til the cows come home but still miss the obvious! And I'm supposed to know my English; uh oh!

Good to see you today.

Ann


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Thanks, Alan. I'm really glad you liked it and I appreciate your kind comment words.

Ann


manatita44 profile image

manatita44 14 months ago from london

Very well done, Ann, to the last 'cut.' or is it 'word cut?' Such poems, to my mind, are difficult to do and yet you did them so well! You also told a good story towards the end, while managing to stay with the theme.

I know a couple of uses, but they are like light swear slang. 'Cut the ....'; and 'cut ......' I haven't really swore in my life. Hardly. I just don't like to.

By the way, your first four paragraphs read like you were talking about me. I am a weaver of words. They tell me this all the time at Poetry Cafe. People say that I'm different; not like the ordinary guy. English is my native tongue, all right, but I am endlessly creating, I mean:

"I sprung out of my nakedness and longing,

Became a pilgrim, in this hallowed Field of Struggle."

"Heaven has kissed you with its beauty."

Much Love, Ann.


BlossomSB profile image

BlossomSB 14 months ago from Victoria, Australia

Delightful! You must have spent so long researching and writing for this hub and it shows! A couple of typos don't matter, but you might like to alter 'wrapped' to 'rapt' as the meaning is different. Really enjoyed reading it.


alancaster149 profile image

alancaster149 14 months ago from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire)

I'll just cut to the 'congrats', Ann. I enjoyed this. What else can I say, the wind's been cut from my sail!


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Thanks, Ruby, for your lovely words. It's important to me that I'm able to entertain my friends here, so I'm glad you liked this.

Ann


always exploring profile image

always exploring 14 months ago from Southern Illinois

Ann, I love this witty and informative hub. You certainly are a CUT above us all with your word usage. Interesting and fun reading...


social thoughts profile image

social thoughts 14 months ago from New Jersey

Darn, I forgot they no longer let you vote "up" on these. This is very creative and informative. I very much enjoyed your article on these words. I love that you included the poems, too. Lovely!


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Well, Frank, what a comment! It cuts the mustard, so I think I'll cut and run - wait a minute, I didn't use that one did I?! It's funny how more keep popping into my head - thanks for that!

Ann


Frank Atanacio profile image

Frank Atanacio 14 months ago from Shelton

annart,, I'm simply going to cut to the chase... I love this whole concept period.. and love the poetry... so cutty.. think I pour a shot LOL awesome and keep them coming.. this is a cut above the rest


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Thank you, John, for such lovely words. Glad you like the series. I do like writing poetry, have done for years, and some things just lend themselves to it more than prose. Dancing and the sea are two of those. Other subjects just decide they want to be in prose, so I let them take follow their own paths.

Thank you for the compliment and for your valued support.

Ann


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Venkatachari M: Thank you for that wonderful comment; it made me smile with pleasure. I love the idea of being a magician!

So glad you liked this.

Ann


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Hi Theresa! So glad you like this and the series. I love it that everyone thinks it's entertaining and humorous. I'm overwhelmed by the response.

I'm just pleased that I have so many words to choose from!

Great to have your support; you're a lovely friend and it always cheers me when I see you're one of my visitors.

I hope your week is full of wonder and fun, Theresa.

Ann


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

RTalloni: Thanks for your great comment. Glad you enjoyed the journey!

Ann


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Will: Thank you so much. 'Cutting edge humour' - I do so like that! It seems once a teacher, always a teacher, according to bill and you! I like that,though, and I love to pass on information in a fun way. I had great fun writing this and I love dancing and being on the sea, so that worked well all round!

Enjoy your week, Will!

Ann


Jodah profile image

Jodah 14 months ago from Queensland Australia

Oh how I love this series Ann, a mix of information about words and poetry. I am so glad to see you especially expressing yourself in poetry and you seem to be enjoying it. They are just getting better and better. Thanks for this great hub .


Venkatachari M profile image

Venkatachari M 14 months ago from Hyderabad, India

Wonderful and interesting. You are a magician with words. You can toss any word and mold it into your stories, poems, essays, etc....,etc.

Thanks for this feast of words.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 14 months ago from southern USA

Oh, Ann, you are certainly a cut above with this delightful series here. I love your humor ...that's how we spell it over here in the US. You always present the best of both worlds, entertaining and educational!

Peace and blessings,

Theresa


RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 14 months ago from the short journey

Nicely done, for sure. You've traipsed us through worlds of place and time without cutting the journey short!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 14 months ago from Phoenix, Arizona

This is cutting edge humor, Ann! Well done. Fun but also informative is a great way to teach.


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Thanks, whonu. Glad you liked it.

Ann


whonunuwho profile image

whonunuwho 14 months ago from United States

Interesting play on words my friend and well done. Blessings. whonu


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

mckbirdbks: You say such wonderful things, you make me blush! Thank you for those kind words; they mean a great deal coming from such a polished writer as you. I love 'stampede from your pen'; how dramatic!

It did take me a lot longer than I thought it would so I'm glad it flows as I wished. It's so good to have feedback that lets me know I've succeeded in my aim! You've made my day.

Ann


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 14 months ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

You are a magician of words, they weave and nest and rest and stampede from your pen. An amusing read this afternoon. I see you put plenty of effort into this and it flows smoothly. Thank you.


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Thanks for your kind comment, bill, and I'm glad this made you smile even all the way through this looong article! I kind of got carried away.

Professor Ann? Sounds a bit too teachy for me; I'll stick with educational and entertaining though, thanks. Lovely!

Enjoy the rest of a tasty Tuesday and have a wacky week, bill.

Ann


billybuc profile image

billybuc 14 months ago from Olympia, WA

I smiled all the way through this educational and entertaining article. Well done my wordsmith friend. A thoroughly enjoyable read once again. We're going to start calling you Professor Ann and rightly so.

bill


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

What a lovely comment, Nell! Thank you so much.

I didn't know that about the Cutty Sark either, until I did my research. It's such a strange thing to choose as a ship's name, I think.

Thanks for reading and for sharing, Nell.

Ann


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 14 months ago from England

Well, that was so interesting! talk about a cut above the rest! lol! and I never knew that the cutty sark really meant a shirt or dress. Fascinating read, and I learned so much too, now I am cutting out the compliments and rushing to share your hub! LOL!


annart profile image

annart 14 months ago from SW England Author

Carb Diva: Thank you so much. Glad you like the series and I appreciate the compliment. Glad you found it fun too; I try to make them so.

Ann


Carb Diva profile image

Carb Diva 14 months ago

Ann - I love these excursions. You never disappoint. Thanks for a fun (and informative) read.

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