The Healing - A Short Story

The Healing


The morning dew dampened the hem of her skirts as she walked the garden rows. Looking carefully around one more time, Millie Baker quickly bent and pulled two leaves off a head of lettuce, placing them carefully in her pocket. To her relief, no one seemed to have noticed.

Two years ago, her former life had come to an abrupt end when her mother and father left for dinner on their anniversary. She went to sleep with a babysitter on watch, and woke to a houseful of strangers. She listened bewildered as a policewoman told her of the terrible accident and she slowly realized that she would never see her mother and father again.

The next year was a jumbled haze. She was the only child, and had no relatives except her paternal grandparents, and she was afraid of them, or at least of her Grandpa George Baker. He was gruff and unsmiling, but she had no choice, so she moved to Kansas, and the farm. Her father had been a lawyer, so her financial future was secure, but her childhood life looked bleak indeed. Her grandfather never called her Millie or showed any affection. He always referred to her as ‘Young Lady’.

“Sit up straight, Young Lady.” “Shut the door, Young Lady.” “Have you done your chores, Young Lady?”

Grandma Sally was as gentle as George was stern. She taught Millie how to churn butter, feed the chickens, and gather the eggs from the unhappy hens who pecked her small hands. She showed her how to cook and bake. She taught her to play her precious piano, and Millie adored her. She loved her grandmother almost as much as she feared her grandfather.

Not that he had ever abused her. In fact, she had never seen him truly angry, but he never smiled, and work was all he seemed to know. The worst part was his rule on pets.

Millie already knew better than to make a pet out of farm animals, because their fate was certain. No sense in making a pet out of a potential steak, or a side of bacon, and the rooster she had found humorous in his dawn crowing ended up as Sunday dinner. But her grandfather also forbade her to make a pet out of the dogs and the cats.

“They have jobs, so they aren’t pets. The dogs herd and keep foxes out of the henhouses. The cats keep the rats and mice out of the barn and the corncribs. They aren’t pets, and I want them left alone.”

Grandma Sally patted her hand “He’s good man, down deep, Millie, and he’d be surprised to hear that he’s just like his father before him, but he is. All he’s ever known is hard work and hard times, so he doesn’t know when to stop. He’s quite a remarkable man you know. He’s a superb mechanic, and fixes his own machinery. He’s also a good carpenter. He designed and built all these buildings. He’s so good with sick animals that veterinarians often ask his opinion. But as I said, he just doesn’t know when to stop. He loves to have an extra cup of coffee and a doughnut in the morning, but he won’t allow himself the pleasure.”

School was good, and she loved riding the bus. The driver was a jolly woman who let the kids make as much noise as they wanted as long as they stayed in their seats. She made lots of good friends and often stayed at their homes overnight. Life was not that bad…except for her sour Grandpa George and the fact that she longed for a pet of her own.

One of Millie's favorite chores was picking raspberries along the north fence line, where she could hear the sweet, warbling calls of the meadowlarks seated on the telephone lines. That’s what she was doing when she discovered Fuzzball.

Her pail was nearly half full of berries when she came upon the bloody fur scattered about on the ground. The tale was clear; something had killed a cottontail for its dinner. She shrugged her shoulders at nature’s way, and almost missed the small ball of fur hidden away in the rooted raspberry brambles along the fence.

It was no larger than a baseball and she could see neither eyes nor a tail. It was a baby rabbit, and undoubtedly the orphan of the late scattered fur. She picked it up, and it suddenly woke up, startled and frightened, but too weak to resist. She stroked its fur, and it balled up again. She smiled.

“You’re just a little fuzz ball! In fact, that’s your name…Fuzzball.”

Making up her mind, Millie put the baby cottontail in her apron pocket, and started for the house, her mind concocting and discarding various plots. At last, she decided to hide the baby rabbit in the hollow of the big oak tree behind the house. To her seven year old mind, it was as safe as she could make it.

She found an eyedropper in the medicine cabinet and mixed up some fresh milk with a drop of honey. She heated it under the hot water faucet, and then quietly made her way to the oak. She tried to get Fuzzball to suck on the eyedropper without success, and was frustrated until she accidentally squirted a little on his lips. He licked the offending liquid and seemed to like it, so she did it again and he licked it again. She had found a way.

For the next two weeks, she fed him milk, and he came out from hiding in the hollow in the base of the oak at the sound of her footsteps, eager and hungry. Then one day, she brought a scrap of lettuce from the table, and after a few tentative nibbles, he ate that too. She gave him a little milk for a few more days and then weaned him.

Last night, there had been no table scraps, so Millie stole the two lettuce leaves from Grandpa George’s garden. She felt guilty, but justified it in her child’s mind, because Fuzzball had to eat.

“I’m going to ride the bus home with Judy Doogan this afternoon and spend the night at her house, so I won’t see you tonight, or in the morning, Fuzzball. But I’ll be back tomorrow night with your supper.”

She placed the second lettuce leaf in the hollow and left.

When the bus dropped her off the next afternoon, Millie raced down the lane and ran to her room. She changed into her work clothes and dropped the three carrots she saved from her lunch into her pocket. The back door slammed as she ran to the oak to feed Fuzzball.

He was gone.

She felt around the hollow, but he was not there. Tears were welling in her eyes when a shadow suddenly darkened the space. Startled, she spun around and was confronted with the tall, stern figure of her grandfather, his hands on his hips.

“Are you looking for that rabbit?” He was scowling.

She nodded, her eyes wide and frightened.

“Come with me.” He abruptly spun on his heel and walked off. Millie followed, her heart in her throat.

Millie had to run to keep up with his long strides. They rounded the barn, and headed toward the chicken house, where her grandfather led her to the far side. There, on the back of the building, was a small structure that she had never seen before. It was a freshly built rabbit hutch, and Fuzzball was contentedly munching lettuce out of the garden.

“You need to be honest, Young lady. It’s no good to be sneaky like that. I knew all along about that rabbit, but where you had him, a fox could have easily gotten him. He’ll be safe here.”

Her mouth dropped open, and she turned to face him.

“You mean I can keep him, Grandpa?”

His voice was gruff. “You can keep him until he’s full grown, but he’s a wild creature so eventually, you’ll have to let him go.”

She wrapped her small arms around his legs, pressing her cheek against him.

“Oh, thank you Grandpa! I love you, Grandpa!”

He patted her small head awkwardly but gently with his rough, gnarled old hand.

“I love you too, Millie”

She looked up, and suddenly realized how ancient and tired he looked. Then his leathery, seamed old face slowly crinkled into a smile, and she knew life was going to be different between her and her grandfather.

“That was very sweet of you to build that hutch for Millie, George.”

George Baker swabbed his breakfast plate with his toast, picking up the last of the eggs. He glanced up at Sally who was fussing with something on the stove. Millie had left for school, and they were alone.

“After chores I’m going over to the Thompson place.”

“What for, George?”

“He has some nice ponies, and I’m thinking of getting one for Millie.”

Sally placed a plate of fresh, hot doughnuts and another cup of coffee in front of her husband.

He stared at her. “I have to get at my chores, Sally,“ he protested.

“You’ll sit there and enjoy your coffee and doughnuts for once, George Baker. The hired hands can do your chores. That's why you hired them. And I thought you wanted no pets?”

His voice was gruff, but unconvincing. “Well, she’ll need a pony to ride around the farm on her chores. It’ll be a working animal, Sally.”

Sally smiled down at him and patted his shoulder.

“Eat your doughnuts, you old fraud.”



More by this Author


Comments 114 comments

Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ

This is a wonderful story. These old farmers and ranchers didn't know anything but work and often had no idea what to do with children but put them to work as soon as they were big enough.

I had a great-uncle like that, he scared the tar out of me. He would pick at us also. One day I discovered the twinkle in his eyes and that he liked chocolate applesauce cake. He was mine from then on. I still miss the gruff old coot.


writer20 profile image

writer20 4 years ago from Southern Nevada

This such a wonderful story,I love it.

Voted up and awesome.


sgbrown profile image

sgbrown 4 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

This is such a heart warming story! Sometimes men that have done nothing more than work all of their lives, don't know how to show their emotions. This is a wonderful story! Voted up and awesome! :)


Old Poolman profile image

Old Poolman 4 years ago from Rural Arizona

WillStarr - I had it figured they would be having rabbit stew for supper that night. You got me again my friend. That was a great story.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 4 years ago from Southern Illinois

I have a warm fuzzy feeling after reading this. I loved it. I was sure something bad was going to happen. You always make everything ok. Thank you Will..


b. Malin profile image

b. Malin 4 years ago

What a Sweet Story, Will. I'm so glad you gave it a Happy Ending...or maybe beginning for Millie and her Grandfather...Either way, It's a Winner...and it got my Vote UP too.


Rosemay50 profile image

Rosemay50 4 years ago from Hawkes Bay - NewZealand

This is such a warm heartening story. It is sometimes hard for men to let there feelings show. It took just a little girls love for a rabbit to open up that big old heart and realise there was more to life than work.

Awesome story, thank you


bethperry profile image

bethperry 4 years ago from Tennesee

Oh Will, George reminds me of my Granddaddy! What a touching and wonderful story!!

Voting up and thanks for posting.


diogenes profile image

diogenes 4 years ago from UK and Mexico

A lovely gentle story, Will. It made me cry tears of joy.

Some of the best people are the least demonstrative until a chance to be compassionate and kind allows the reality to be seen

I am going to send this to a close friend for mother's day

Bob


thougtforce profile image

thougtforce 4 years ago from Sweden

There is something good in every human but some people have forgotten how to show it! Lovely story and I enjoyed the picture that your words created in my mind. Fabulous, as always!

Tina


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC

Old George has a big old heart after all. What a wonderful Sunday morning story for me. Thanks again for all your stories.


GClark profile image

GClark 4 years ago from United States

Great story that brought tears to my eyes! Excellent job with character development which immediately draws the reader into the story. Voted Up! GClark


KDuBarry03 4 years ago

Played Old George as stern as ear until the end where he actually has a soft spot in his heart to allow Millie to have the Rabbit. Well done! You definitely have a very interesting voice in your narration. I really enjoyed this piece!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi Becky!

I think we may have had the same uncle!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, writer20! I really enjoyed your last poem!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thanks for reading, sgbrown!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi Mike, and thank you!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, b. Malin!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, Rosemay50!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi Beth, and thank you!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi bob,

I grew up with just such men and women, and they all had gentle hearts when the chips were down.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you so much, Tina!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi suziecat7, and thank you for everything!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you for reading, GClark!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, KDuBarry03, for the great comments!


G-Ma Johnson profile image

G-Ma Johnson 4 years ago from NW in the land of the Free

Heart warming, sweet, beautiful and so like you...Thanks I needed this one today...:O) God Bless...G-Ma


Nan Mynatt profile image

Nan Mynatt 4 years ago from Illinois

Will this story sounds like you once lived on a farm. I lived on a farm with my grand parents and it was a once in a lifetime venture. I had a pony and my grandfather had all kinds of plants, vegetables, fruit trees, cows, horses. He hired help to pick cotton. He was a wonderful man and my grandmother. My grandfather had 21 brothers, and 5 sisters, by 3 wives! I like the country but not the work! Great story, you have reached the top of your story telling. I marked you up!


xstatic profile image

xstatic 4 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

I was about to write heartwarming, which it is, but will just echo above comments and say Great Hub!


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 4 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

My grandparents on both sides were pretty old when I was young like that.On one side they had quit farming and rented out the land. My other grandparents were out of farming except for some chickens running around. They never seemed to move much. I don't think they spoke English .Grandma sat in her rocker by the Summer Kitchen. I found them quite daunting.

Your story speaks to the generational gap and connection, if you know what I mean.


cat on a soapbox profile image

cat on a soapbox 4 years ago from Los Angeles

Hi, Will. Love isn't always shown in the ways we expect. I really enjoyed this story and got a real smile out of the last line! Thanks, as always, for the treat of your fine storytelling.


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 4 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

This has all the traits of an accomplished writer.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South

Great story, reminded me a little of one I wrote a few years back, from the rabbits point of view that is, lol. Glad you have happy endings. We need them.


Angela Blair profile image

Angela Blair 4 years ago from Central Texas

What a tremendously tender story, Will. Grandpa reminds me of my rancher father-in-law Luke. He was tough as nails, too -- but hugely lovable even though he tried to hide it. This is beautifully told and superbly written -- enjoyed it very much and voted up all the way across. Best/Sis


resspenser profile image

resspenser 4 years ago from South Carolina

If grandkids don't bring a person humanity, nothing will. Great job, Will!


Sherrye Barrow profile image

Sherrye Barrow 4 years ago from Duncan, AZ

Really liked this short story.It is very well written and brings the reader in.


CMerritt profile image

CMerritt 4 years ago from Pendleton, Indiana

Sweeeeet!

Reminds me much of my grandpa....the older he got, the sweeter he got.

I really liked this one very much...


Dexter Yarbrough profile image

Dexter Yarbrough 4 years ago from United States

Great story, Will. Reminds me of my grandfather - Grandpa Henry. Stern, quiet, but a good man with a caring heart! Another great story from a master storyteller!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, G-Ma Johnson!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi Nan,

I grew up in small town Iowa, but spent my summers on relatives' farms.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, xstatic!


Alexander Mark profile image

Alexander Mark 4 years ago from beautiful, rainy, green Portland, Oregon

That was heartwarming Will, a perfect ending - they were both blessed. Thank you.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, Don.

There is always a generation gap between those who don't remember being young and those who are too young to understand being old.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, cat on a soapbox!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Wow! Thank you, Mike!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, Jackie!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi Angela,

My own paternal grandfather was a little gruff. I used to 'borrow' shotgun shells from a box he kept on a shelf. It didn't occur to me that although I ‘borrowed’ 4 or 5 shells a week, the box never ran out. I found out later that it amused him that I was helping myself, so he kept filling up the same box.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi Ronnie!

I'm sort of stern with the little ones myself, but that keeps them safe. I also show them all the neat things they can do with ordinary things, so they like to come around or go camping with us.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi, Sherrye Barrow, and thanks for the visit!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi CMerritt!

Thank you, my friend!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi Dex!

Both my grandfathers were stern, come to think of it, but both had great hearts too!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, Alexander Mark!


Sueswan 4 years ago

Hi Will

This is such a feel good story.

Voted up and away!

Take care :)


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

Oh Bill, This story made me sad, happy and it made me cry. I loved it!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, Sueswan!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi Susan and thank you!


Cardisa profile image

Cardisa 4 years ago from Jamaica

Oh Will, I love you so much! This was heart warming, a feel good tale of pure love! Just wonderful.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, Carolee!


jeyaramd profile image

jeyaramd 4 years ago from Mississauga, Ontario

Grandfathers and fathers can sometimes be frauds for sure when it comes to being stern; but children definitely can mend their stern hearts into more compassionate souls. Love can conquer all. Thanks for sharing. Voted up, beautiful and awesome.


breakfastpop profile image

breakfastpop 4 years ago

What a wonderful story, Will. I needed a happy ending. Up beautiful and awesome.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi jeyaramd, and thank you for reading me!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Happy to oblige, Pop!


drbj profile image

drbj 4 years ago from south Florida

This sweet story, Will, was as warm and fuzzy as that Fuzzball of a rabbit. Thank you for the treat.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 4 years ago from California

You have such a wonderful way of touching the heart--You touched mine!


Denise Handlon profile image

Denise Handlon 4 years ago from North Carolina

Loved this story, Will. Thanks for creating this and sharing it here on HP! :) Rated UP and awesome.


Ginn Navarre profile image

Ginn Navarre 4 years ago

Great as always. Showing ones emotions is always hard for those that were not shown and given it to pass on.


amysutch profile image

amysutch 4 years ago from Germantown, Maryland

Very nice story - well written.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, drbj!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi Audrey, and thank you!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thanks for the visit, Denise!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Great point, Ginn!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi amysutch, and welcome to HugbPages. "First Impressions" is a fine story!


TripleAMom profile image

TripleAMom 4 years ago from Florida

This is such a great story. I love how both found love in each other. Voting up of course.


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Oh, how I wish I could share this one with Mom. She would tell me of her stern but loving Daddy and how he finally allowed her to have a pet goat, named "Pooky".

This is a beautiful, tender and memorable story, my dear.

Loved it from start to finish. Voted UP & ABI.


dragupine profile image

dragupine 4 years ago

This is such a beautifully crafted and thoughtful story! I wish I could write like that!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you for reading, TripleAMom!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

I too wish your mom was here to read things like this, Maria. Neither my mother or father ever read any of this stuff.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi dragupine! Maybe you can write! I'll go see!


dragupine profile image

dragupine 4 years ago

haha. yeah i like writing i'm just not spectacular at it.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

On the contrary, you are a very good writer! I highly recommend "I can see the stars".


Doug Reece 4 years ago

Thanks Will,it took me back to my childhood in the bush of northern Canada.As we lived of of the land and cut and skidded timber to buy staple goods ,my father told me that I had to work like a man .This was no place for a boy of 10. It was tbe best thing he could have taught me .

Another home run Will. You just made my day .

P.S. Diane is improving each day.I will read your story to her when she wakes.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, Doug! I hope she enjoys it.


Diane Reece 4 years ago

TRUE ABOUT ALL THE COMMENTS WILL! EVEN I CAN RELATE TO LIVING IN THE COUNTRY AND GETTING EGGS FROM THE CHICKENS AND HOEING IN THE CARDEN. WITH FIVE KIDS TO RAISE WE ALWAYS DID LOTS OF CANNING AND CHOPPING OFF THE HEADS OF CHICKENS FOR THE FREEZER! NOT MY CHORE OF CHOICE!

I WANTED TO COMMENT ON MY OWN AS I'M UP TO GETTING BACK TO READING SOME STORIES WITH LOTS OF HEART AND TWISTS!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, Diane, and good to see you up and around!

^_^


rahul0324 profile image

rahul0324 4 years ago from Gurgaon, India

A heart warming and touching story


Drexlpi profile image

Drexlpi 4 years ago from macon ga

Nice story it made me smile.


SubRon7 profile image

SubRon7 4 years ago from eastern North Dakota

I've been a little late reading lately, Will, but OMG what a story. It brought memories and two eyes full of water.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, rahul0324, and welcome to Will Starr world!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi Drexlpi, and thank you!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, James. When grandparents are suddenly forced back into parenting, it can be very difficult. It can also be very rewarding.


bmcoll3278 profile image

bmcoll3278 4 years ago from Longmont, Colorado

As always a touching story. Made me think of my Dad. Your talent is without bounds.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, BMColl!


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

Hi Will, this was such a lovely story, Millie managed to soften his old heart, even if he didn't want to admit it! wonderful!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, Nell!


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 4 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

What a totally awesome little story. And you have a fantastic writing style. I enjoyed this!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, Rebecca!


Richawriter profile image

Richawriter 4 years ago from On Top of the World

Good job Willstarr!

The Old man showed his true colors in the end!

Nice ending to an interesting story.

Peace


50 Caliber profile image

50 Caliber 4 years ago from Arizona

Will, great tale of heart that reminded me of a couple men, generations past that coming out of the depression held work ethic above all else, seemed they would break and throw out a little change as your character did, one of them did the other didn't.

A story landing close to home,

Peace,

dust


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi Richawriter,

I knew several men like this, so it's a composite. In the end, they were all good men.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Exactly Dusty. We all knew men like George Baker.

Thank you for reading.


RedElf profile image

RedElf 4 years ago from Canada

Thanks for this lovely story. You brought tears to my eyes, and reminded me of my father's father, my own scary, gruff grampa. He bred gladioli and kept fish in a pond in the garden, among other things... and he taught us how to cheat at cribbage.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, RedElf,

If I can please a fine poet, I can please anyone!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, Nan!


HNan Mynatt 4 years ago

I see a lot of typo's on my comment on the last comment.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

If you want to rewrite it and post it again, I will delete the prior one.


sarahbeth006 profile image

sarahbeth006 4 years ago from Maryland

That was great! My grandfather was very much that way with all of his grandchildren, right up until my younger sister was born. She got whatever she wanted. He would gas up his riding lawn mower for her, knowing full well that she would chase his chickens when he wasn't watching. He never yelled at her when he heard the chickens fussing. He always yelled at the dog, who was wisely hiding under the back porch.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, sarahbeth006!

The youngest child always seems to get away with more!

^_^


Pamela Kinnaird W profile image

Pamela Kinnaird W 4 years ago from Maui and Arizona

I enjoyed this story, its setting, its characters and the good old-fashioned reminders of days which were simpler. Thanks for crafting it meticulously and sharing it with us.


Nan Mynatt profile image

Nan Mynatt 4 years ago from Illinois

Will please delete my comments so that I can rewrite it again!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Hi, Pamela Kinnaird W, and thank you for reading me!


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Consider it done, Nan!


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 18 months ago from Dallas, Texas

Touching and beautiful story, as usual, Will. This brought back the tales my Dad used to tell about his days on the farm in Georgia. Animals had a purpose and weren't for fun or enjoyment other than as food. His father was quite an inventor and a stern but kind sort of guy who was born in 1880. He lived through a lot of different times. You've brought back the days with imagery and crisp detail.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 18 months ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, Peg! Some gruff old men (and a few women) find it difficult to communicate at a child's level.


mary615 profile image

mary615 17 months ago from Florida

I held my breath while reading this. I was so afraid Grandpa intended to harm the baby rabbit!

I do love happy endings! Of course he had to have a good reason to get a pony, right?

Voted this Hub UP, etc. and will share.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 17 months ago from Phoenix, Arizona Author

Thank you, Mary!

Sometimes gruff old men are hiding a soft and vulnerable heart.

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