Do You Appreciate The Importance of Power or Take It for Granted?

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The Importance of Power

by John Hansen © 2014


Do we appreciate the power

man has been gifted?

Anything is possible,

within our grasp.

First the knowledge

to make fire,

the skill to craft a wheel.

Progress raced ahead.

Telling time

by the sun's position.

Navigating

by following the stars.

Gas lighting,

the horse and buggy,

then automobiles.

Bell's telephone,

Edison's lightbulb

and electricity for power.

~~~WAIT!~~~

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The power is out!

What will we do?

Quick grab a flashlight,

find the candles and matches.

Oh God, no TV!

The phone's not working,

there's no water, the pump's off.

No Internet....agh!

Thank God for batteries,

especially in the laptop and iPad.

I can at least read an eBook.

~~~WAIT!~~~

They aren't charged...agh!


I'll just have to read a 'real' book,

by candlelight.

How primitive.

Electrical History

Here is some information from the book, Electrical History by Tom Henry.

"This book was written in appreciation of the more than 15 million men and women that work in the electrical industry to keep the lights burning every second, every minute, 24 hours a day, everyday."

-Tom Henry

Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790)

His kite experiment demonstrated that lightning is electricity. He was the first to use the terms positive and negative charge.

Franklin was one of seventeen children. He quit school at age ten to become a printer. His life is the classic story of a self-made man achieving wealth and fame through determination and intelligence.

Michael Faraday (1791-1867) an Englishman, made one of the most significant discoveries in the history of electricity: Electromagnetic induction. His pioneering work dealt with how electric currents work. Many inventions would come from his experiments, but they would come fifty to one hundred years later.

Failures never discouraged Faraday. He would say; "the failures are just as important as the successes." He felt failures also teach. The farad, the unit of capacitance is named in the honor of Michael Faraday.

Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931) was one of the most well known inventors of all time with 1093 patents. Self-educated, Edison was interested in chemistry and electronics.During the whole of his life, Edison received only three months of formal schooling, and was dismissed from school as being retarded, though in fact a childhood attack of scarlet fever had left him partially deaf.

Nikola Tesla was born of Serbian parents July 10, 1856 and died a broke and lonely man in New York City January 7, 1943. He envisioned a world without poles and power lines. Referred to as the greatest inventive genius of all time. Tesla's system triumphed to make possible the first large-scale harnessing of Niagara Falls with the first hydroelectric plant in the United States in 1886.


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Comments 51 comments

DDE profile image

DDE 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

Being so used to having the luxury needs we tend to forget about those who don't have power. Your words are so meaningful.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks DDE, yes we get spoiled by all the modern conveniences and take them for granted. Some people have never had electricity or even clean drinking water and sanitation. We should be appreciative for all we have.


Bk42author profile image

Bk42author 2 years ago from New York

We have absolutely become so dependant on these conveniences and do take them for granted! The couple of times I went someplave and forgot to take my phone with me I felt so unbelievably lost! Meanwhile, I do remember the days when we didn't have cell phones, yet I felt I couldn't survive that one day? I also noticed I've become lazy in some ways too, for instance I don't know most of my friends & family's phone numbers. All I have to do to call them is press one button with their name.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

Jodah, nicely done! Technology is all well and good but we often have to get back to basic, so very annoying!! :)


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

I know what you mean Bk42author, I got a new cell phone a few months back and can't even remember my own number let alone anyone else's, lucky they are saved in the phone. But I'm not overly reliant on my phone. I am always prepared for power outages though so don't get so stressed out by that.

Thanks Jo. Yes we are too reliant on technology, we have to try to be more self-reliant.


billybuc profile image

billybuc 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

I am ready to return to primitive, John! I sometimes thing that our modern societies need a serious wake-up call; being without power would be such a call. Power to the self-sufficient! :)


Michael-Milec profile image

Michael-Milec 2 years ago

Hi Jodah.

Punctiliously portrayed progress in which our generation lives 'lavishly.'

BTW, unparalleled pleasure gives reading a 'real' book, at the 'real' day-light (candlelight too )- bringing memories of how life can be simple and beautiful , once again.

Voted interesting.

Make a pleasant day.


kidscrafts profile image

kidscrafts 2 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

Technology changed our life for sure and when something happens sometimes people are lost. In August 2003, we had blackout throughout parts of the Northeastern and Midwestern United States and Ontario. I always have candles at home so we were able to see what I prepared for supper (tuna and salad) and we played games :-) If you make the best of it... it's a great experience :-) For me it was fun!

My biggest concern was the ice cream in my freezer ;-)

Have a great week, John!


JayeWisdom profile image

JayeWisdom 2 years ago from Deep South, USA

Magnificently worded!

I had to chuckle because my digital home phone was out of order from Tuesday until the repair tech arrived early this morning, and I felt "deprived" even though I have a mobile phone. We are all so spoiled to modern conveniences, aren't we?

Having been without all types of power (electricity, phones, water and even gasoline shortages and long lines at gas stations) for weeks after Hurricane Katrina, I don't share Bill's desire to "go primitive." I don't want to live lavishly, but do want some "mod-cons" and comfort in my old age! Haha.

Voted Up and Awesome, Jodah....Shared

Jaye


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Exactly Bill. If people thought about being self-sufficient they would have solar power and a generator back-up. If not just enjoy the power outage by reading "real books at candlelight", playing board games instead of video games, and communicating in person instead of chatting on Facebook etc.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for your interesting comment Michael. Yes life can be both simple and beautiful.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Yes Jaye I understand that extended outages of these services as after a hurricane can be hard to live with. It is a good idea to have a back up generator, even a small one so you can run a refrigerator and computer and charge items like phones. Even better solar power, but not every one can have that. If there is a gasoline shortage it defeats the usefulness of a generator. I live a semi "primitive" life already. Thanks for the "awesome" vote up and share.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Is Jo(kidscrafts). It is wise to always have candles and matches or lighter where you can access them quickly. A small generator that can run a refrigerator is a good idea for saving your ice cream. I would be worried about that too. ..lol. It is a great opportunity for playing games and family time though. You have a great week too.


Ghaelach 2 years ago

Hi John.

Great words and wouldn't it be an abuse of power if we lost our electricity.

But then again that's the power of being able to strike for more money and better conditions.

Ghaelach


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Haha Ghaelach, "an abuse of power if we lost our electricity" , mabe more so if we shouted expletives at the power company for the power going out. Thanks for commenting.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 2 years ago from Southern Illinois

Wow, what a horrible mess we'd be in without power, or would we? We might enjoy the quietness but only for a VERY short time. lol..


bravewarrior profile image

bravewarrior 2 years ago from Central Florida

How primitive indeed! Isn't it a trip how people freak out when their gadgets go on the fritz? Amazing. Give me a book any day. I don't even own an eReader or a smart phone for that matter.


fpherj48 profile image

fpherj48 2 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

Very clever & enlightening, Jodah....and oh so true. How often I have commented....rather "asked" aloud....."How the heck did we get along in life before microwaves, cell phones and internet?" We become adjusted and comfortable quite easily and quickly to newer high tech comforts.

There's a short-cut for just about everything. As your hub suggests that we should stop and think about this, I could not agree more.

I am old enough to vividly recall being without A LOT of what is available today. I believe we should all at least know how to survive well without some of the conveniences and extras. We've all become much too soft!...UP+++ tweeted.


Genna East profile image

Genna East 2 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

“I'll just have to read a 'real' book,

by candlelight.

How primitive.”

Lol. Humorous but very true. We should be so thankful for what we have. But are we?


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 2 years ago

Jodah, this is great. I have so many books to read, and read I did yesterday when the thunderstorm hit. I turn my computer off when we have thunder and lightening.

Voted-up +++++ and shared.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Always exploring, I did get a new "real" book a few days ago and I just need an excuse to sit down and read it. Maybe I need the power to go out so I don't have Internet. As you say many of us may enjoy the peace and quiet for a short time, but for how long?


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi fpherj48. I am just old enough to remember having to get by without most of the conveniences you mention as well, and as I live in a rural area if the power goes out we also lose water supply to our house and have to go fill buckets etc. luckily we have a small solar array and generator. I agree that we have become too soft and I do miss the Internet if we don't have power for some reason. I could easily live without a phone unless there was an emergency however. Thanks for the vote up and tweet.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for reading Genna. You're right. We should be thankful for all we have and not take it for granted. Appreciate how difficult life must have been in the past, but people got by with what they had.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for your kind comment Shyron. Yes we do the same if there is a thunderstorm. I just need an excuse to sit down with a good book too. Thanks for the vote up and share too.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Yes, we have become to reliant upon technology indeed! I remember back when Hurricane Ivan hit the coast of our state, and we live a couple hundred miles inland, and it was so unusual for the strong winds and such to come that far inland, but it did. Well, anyway, we had some down trees and power lines, and had no electricity for three days. The funny thing was, my children were still living at home then, and we all came out and played board games and laughed and talked by candlelight, as there was no tv or computers or anything, but each other! It was great really. Really made me think that sometimes all of this technology is not so great, but then we were relieved when the power came back on because we did lose all of our food in the freezer. And for those three days, the weather was pleasant but on that third day it was starting to get so humid again, and so we were thankful for air conditioning, as it is terribly hot here in the deep South.

I remember growing up and staying outside the whole day playing and we did not feel the need to be in contact with someone every minute of the day as we are now with our cell phones and Internet.

Have a lovely evening,

Faith Reaper


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for the very interesting hub Faith. It is good to hear of each other's personal experiences that relate to the hub topics.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Oops, meant to say "too reliant" and, yes, I love reading of other hubbers' experiences as to the hub topic indeed.

Blessings,

Faith Reaper


Frank Atanacio profile image

Frank Atanacio 2 years ago from Shelton

very good Jodah.. like life.. from crawling to walking and when you reach old age.. crawl again..LOL Very eye opening piece of reality :)


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks Frank, any positive comment from a writer of your ability is worthy praise, and much appreciated. Your analogy from crawling to old age, and crawling again very apt.


MsDora profile image

MsDora 2 years ago from The Caribbean

How primitive, but also how nostalgically refreshing. Good work, Jodah!


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you MsDora, great to get your kind comment.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 2 years ago from Wales

Wonderful as always Jodah.

Each and every hub of yours are so interesting and well presented. This one brings back memories of when my kids were small and we would light candles when the electricity was off and then cook potatoes wrapped in foil cooked under the fire grate.

Here's to so many more for us both to share.

Enjoy your day.

Eddy.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Yes Eddy, it is so great to seize an opportunity like being without power for the family to do things together they don't normally have time for. Glad it brought back memories. Thanks for your kind words. You have a good day too.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Yes Eddy, it is so great to seize an opportunity like being without power for the family to do things together they don't normally have time for. Glad it brought back memories. Thanks for your kind words. You have a good day too.


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 2 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

Just the smile I needed this morning. Great song choice.


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

Wait! I like that! It's been a few years, but on occasion a snowstorm or hurricane will turn the power off and I realize how we've grown all too accustomed to our electrified, digitalized world.


janshares profile image

janshares 2 years ago from Washington, DC

Love it, Jodah! You speak the truth about how we take power for granted. And you make your case poetically with very few words. That's the mark of a gifted poet. I enjoyed this one very much, voted up, funny, and interesting.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks mckbirdbks, always glad to bring a smile to one's face. Glad this poem and song did that.

Flourish we lose ours quite often if there is a big storm, so we are always prepared. Our major inconvenience is that we lose water to the house, but we have tanks so can go outside to fill up, but we can't flush toilets etc.

Thank you so much Jan, for your generous comment and for the vote up. Much appreciated.


BlossomSB profile image

BlossomSB 2 years ago from Victoria, Australia

"How primitive," but how satisfying! Interesting poem.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for reading Blossom, yes it is satisfying.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 2 years ago from The Beautiful South

I was in a three day blizzard with no power and let me tell you I don't ever want to go through that again. Surprisingly I did discover you can heat beans and wieners hot enough to burn you with a candle under a skillet; and kept that skillet going for three days too, cause it wasn't quick. lol I spent most of those days under a pile of blankets and quilts and still almost froze to death. When the power came back I was in circles, deciding what to do first.

Your poem brought back all of that! ^


jhamann profile image

jhamann 2 years ago from Reno NV

Reading a book by candlelight! Hey, isn't that how Milton went blind! Just joking, great poem. Jamie


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Aw Jackie, sorry my poem brought back those nasty memories of losing your power for three days in that blizzard. I hope it doesn't happen again. Thanks for the interesting comment though.

Thanks for reading Jamie, I don't think you should read by candlelight for an extended period, you could go blind from eye strain, or fall asleep and the house burn down... :)


Eric Flynn profile image

Eric Flynn 2 years ago from Providence, Rhode Island

Lights out could be real interesting. I'd love to see the world fidget.

EWF


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Yeah, imagine a world wide black out! Just for an hour or two to see everyone squirm. Thanks for reading Eric.


Hackslap profile image

Hackslap 2 years ago from Sydney, Australia

The first thing I noticed was the vid for Huey Lewis lol ..love that song ..on another note though you do make a very valid point ..thumbs up!


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks Hackslap. I like Huey Lewis too, hadn't heard him in awhile so had to add that. Thanks for the thumbs up.


Ericdierker profile image

Ericdierker 2 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

My friend, when I was a child we had kerosene lanterns, a "party line" telephone, at least half our heat came from fireplaces. I learned how to prime an old water pump by five years old. One news radio station until I was about 5 and TV came along when I was about 6. No I am not that old, we just lived in the middle of nowhere at 7,000 feet. I loved this hub, thank you.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks Eric, that is a similar way to how I grew up and I am proud of it. I think we are about the same age. Thanks for the kind comment.


annart profile image

annart 2 years ago from SW England

That's why it's nice to go on holiday where electricity isn't taken for granted, where there's no tv, maybe no internet. I don't care. I could live without all that, as long as, like you, I have a book and a candle to read by!

Who's going to survive when all the lights go out? The practical people, the carpenters, the makers, the menders, not the academics and high-flyers.

Lovely poem with lots of wisdom behind the words.

Hope you have a great day! Ann


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for your beautiful comment Ann. I can tell you will be one of the survivors if all the power shuts down suddenly. I am so glad you liked this poem and the message. You have a great day too.

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