...The Suffrage... poetry by Carole Anzolletti

Set in time

alarms and rhyme

Set in light

Dreams of night

Wheels and gears

and Incessant fears

Motors and faces

in long gone places

I decide

on swollen pride

who to tell

and who to quell

I decide

on destinys ride

what lies are told

and what lies I tell

Shadows elastic

along the dawn,

fantastic

streams of thought

in webs are caught

and lay awake

in prisons, fake

a fictional path

covets my wrath

and awakens

the whale

deep inside my sea...

Gratitude for the Darkness

Swirling in cups of coffee and listening to the dog barking...barking...barking

I write and think of this poetry, this instigated creativity that must be caught when it comes along, a thin thread that holds me against winds always threatening me, always just one strand away from snapping and plummeting me down into the abyss. I did not learn this creative method in any class. I did not learn in from a manual or an instructor. I learned it from that place no one but me can ever go. I learned it by watching the short life of butterflies and icicles and seasons. Fallen leaves, passing year after year. Little grains of sand that I am fortunate enough to have accumulate in this hourglass mind of mind, spreading out like a seashore on its horizon with the deep black ocean beyond me.

#seashore #whales #themermaidchronicles #bycaroleanzolletti #theforestlabyrinth #thoughtsescaping #captured #forever


Sylvia Plath, inspired by her Darkness

"Dying
Is an art, like everything else.
I do it exceptionally well"

--- from the Facebook page of Sylvia Plath, today ---

Sylvia PlathJanuary 14 at 7:39am ·

Sylvia Plath’s THE BELL JAR was published on this day in 1963, a month before her death. Plath's only novel was originally published under the pseudonym "Victoria Lucas".

“The silence depressed me. It wasn't the silence of silence. It was my own silence.”
― from "The Bell Jar"

Sylvia Plath's shocking, realistic, and intensely emotional novel about a woman falling into the grip of insanity. Esther Greenwood is brilliant, beautiful, enormously talented, and successful, but slowly going under—maybe for the last time. In her acclaimed and enduring masterwork, Sylvia Plath brilliantly draws the reader into Esther's breakdown with such intensity that her insanity becomes palpably real, even rational—as accessible an experience as going to the movies. A deep penetration into the darkest and most harrowing corners of the human psyche, The Bell Jar is an extraordinary accomplishment and a haunting American classic.

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