Thesis Statements

Photo by  Gregory Szarkiewiczhttp://www.freedigitalphotos.net
Photo by Gregory Szarkiewiczhttp://www.freedigitalphotos.net

The Thesis Statement: probably the easiest and hardest part of writing an academic paper. It's only a sentence after all--in most papers, but tough to write. The thesis statement is the pillar, in which, the essay is supported. The backbone of the content, and a banner for the essay's readers. Here are a few simple steps to generate a thesis statement.

For the purpose of this article. I will supply a few examples.

Subject: Chewable Dog Bones

Audience: My classmates and professor

Purpose: Inform classmates and professor of the different types of chewable dog bones in Wal-Mart.

Step 1

Ask yourself a few questions.


  • What is my message to the reader?
  • What do I want to accomplish?
  • Who are my readers?
  • What is my subject?
  • What am I saying about my subject?
  • Why do I feel it is important for the reader to read my paper?
  • How can I say all of this in one short, detailed sentence?


Questions from Step 1

  • What is my message to the reader?
  • What do I want to accomplish?
  • Who are my readers?
  • What is my subject?
  • What am I saying about my subject?
  • Why do I feel it is important for the reader to read my paper?
  • How can I say all of this in one short, detailed sentence?

Step 2

Combine your questions from Step 1 with the answers in Step 2.


The answers to the previous questions, take them and compile them into a single sentence. Some writers expand it to two sentences, but one condensed sentence is more powerful.


Answers to the previous questions.


  • Research the types of chewable dog bones best for your dog before buying.
  • I want the audience to understand all of the different types of chewable dog bones that Wal-Mart sells, and why they're not all healthy for their pooch.
  • Classmates and professor
  • Chewable dog bones
  • I'm saying that not all chewable dog bones are created equal. Some may be more harmful than others.
  • I feel it's important to the reader for the sake of their pet's health and to prevent any vet bills.
  • I could say this by combining all of my answers into one clear concise sentence.

Example thesis: Because not all chewable dog bones at Wal-mart stores are safe for pets, reading the ingredients of the dog bone is important.


Photo by Michal Marcol http://www.freedigitalphotos.net
Photo by Michal Marcol http://www.freedigitalphotos.net

Step 3

Transform your thesis statement from general to detailed.


Our example thesis sentence is okay, but it is seriously too general. The more specific the thesis statement the better. Having a detailed, specific thesis statement focuses the paper and doesn't confuse the reader. To make our general thesis statement better, ask yourself a few questions.

General Example Thesis: Because not all chewable dog bones at Wal-Mart stores are safe for pets, reading the ingredients of the dog bone is important.

  • What kind of chewable dog bones?
  • Which specific brand?
  • Do I want to talk about a specific chewable dog bone and it's dangers or benefits
  • Do I want to compare two brands or types of dog bones?
  • Are we talking about Wal-Mart online or dog bones sold in Wal-Mart stores only?
  • Why are some of the dog bones safe and others unsafe?
  • Which ingredients are bad?
  • Which ingredients are good?
  • What kind of health dangers are there for my dog?

These types of questions will help build a stronger thesis statement: one that is more precise, concise, and detailed. Now, how do we use the power of questions to actually produce a solid thesis statement that will wow the readers and impress the teacher. Well, a few decisions must be made, and perhaps some research, then use the details decided upon to create a thesis statement.

Detailed Example Thesis: Smokehouse Mammoth Bone sold at Wal-mart online and in-store is more dangerous than the Dingo Munchy Stix chewable bones, due to the latter's capability of splintering and lodging in a dog's throat, stomach, or intestines.

Step 4

Revise your the thesis statement.


A strong thesis statement accomplishes many things for an essay, for readers, and for the author. Thesis statements should focus the essay, inform readers of the essay's content and author's purpose, and help keep the author on topic while writing. Revise your thesis statement until it has all of these attributes. To revise your thesis statement, decide if there are any words in your thesis statement that are still too vague, or if the thesis statement is a complete sentence with a full thought. Revising the thesis statement until it alone can describe the majority of what the essay will discuss is important. A too general thesis statement doesn't accurately portray the essay's intention or the author's. Remember, the more specific the thesis statement the better.

Thank You Reader!

Thesis statements are great, because they help focus your paper and guide readers through the material. Thesis statements don't have to be lengthy to be great. As long as your thesis statement can support the argument, material, and purpose of your essay, then you've got a strong thesis.

As always, I hope this information will assist you in your writing journey. Enjoy! and Good luck.

How do you feel about writing a thesis statement?

  • They're easy.
  • They're a nightmare!
  • Eh. I don't really care.
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Photo by graur razvan ionut http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/view_photog.php?photogid=987

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htodd profile image

htodd 5 years ago from United States

Thanks for the great post..nice

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