Thirty Books That Changed the World

BOOKS THAT HAVE SHAPED OUR THINKING

THE ALL SEEING EYE OF MOST RELIGIONS.
THE ALL SEEING EYE OF MOST RELIGIONS. | Source
HITLER'S BOOK MEIN KAMPF MEANT WORLD WAR TWO WAS INEVITABLE.
HITLER'S BOOK MEIN KAMPF MEANT WORLD WAR TWO WAS INEVITABLE. | Source
CHRISTIANITY IN A BOOK.
CHRISTIANITY IN A BOOK. | Source
CHRISTIANITY ON THE MOVE THANKS TO THE PRINTING PRESS.
CHRISTIANITY ON THE MOVE THANKS TO THE PRINTING PRESS. | Source
THE CRUSADES!
THE CRUSADES! | Source
THE RIGHT FOR ALL CHRISTIANS TO BE ABLE TO READ THE BIBLE HAS TO BE ESTABLISHED.
THE RIGHT FOR ALL CHRISTIANS TO BE ABLE TO READ THE BIBLE HAS TO BE ESTABLISHED. | Source
At one time it was dangerous to have a Bible written in English.
At one time it was dangerous to have a Bible written in English. | Source
THE TALMUD.
THE TALMUD. | Source
THE KORAN.
THE KORAN. | Source
THE NAZI MOVEMENT WAS HELPED ALONG BY MEIN KAMPF.
THE NAZI MOVEMENT WAS HELPED ALONG BY MEIN KAMPF. | Source
STALIN AND THE COMMUNISTS WOULD HAVE DONE WELL TO HAVE TAKEN MEIN KAMPF SERIOUSLY.
STALIN AND THE COMMUNISTS WOULD HAVE DONE WELL TO HAVE TAKEN MEIN KAMPF SERIOUSLY. | Source
DURING THE BLITZ A LONDON SHOP OWNER CLAIMED TO HAVE USED COPIES OF MEIN KAMPF TO PROTECT HIS SHOP.
DURING THE BLITZ A LONDON SHOP OWNER CLAIMED TO HAVE USED COPIES OF MEIN KAMPF TO PROTECT HIS SHOP. | Source
Churchill kept up the morale of the British during the 2nd World War with his speeches. There were British propaganda movies that sent up Mein Kampf as a book so dull and so thick even a dedicated Nazi would have trouble reading it.
Churchill kept up the morale of the British during the 2nd World War with his speeches. There were British propaganda movies that sent up Mein Kampf as a book so dull and so thick even a dedicated Nazi would have trouble reading it. | Source
THE PRINCE.
THE PRINCE. | Source
OLD NICK.
OLD NICK. | Source
Charles Darwin - he rocked the 19th Century and still rocks various parts of the world today with his ideas.
Charles Darwin - he rocked the 19th Century and still rocks various parts of the world today with his ideas. | Source
MAKE ROOM! MAKE ROOM!
MAKE ROOM! MAKE ROOM! | Source
The menace of overpopulation.
The menace of overpopulation. | Source
Going on pilgrimage was part of Medieval life.
Going on pilgrimage was part of Medieval life. | Source
The Canterbury Tales.
The Canterbury Tales. | Source
Among other things, there are fanciful sea voyages in The Decameron.
Among other things, there are fanciful sea voyages in The Decameron. | Source
There's a love for life in the Tao Te Ching. (This is correct. DO NOT CHANGE THE TE TO THE.)
There's a love for life in the Tao Te Ching. (This is correct. DO NOT CHANGE THE TE TO THE.) | Source
The Art of War.
The Art of War. | Source
One writer hoped that by writing about the horrors of World War One there might not be a second, even more terrible war.
One writer hoped that by writing about the horrors of World War One there might not be a second, even more terrible war. | Source
Among other things, Hitler didn't like anti-war books.
Among other things, Hitler didn't like anti-war books. | Source
DAS KAPITAL.
DAS KAPITAL. | Source
The Cold War..
The Cold War.. | Source
The space Age began during the Cold war.
The space Age began during the Cold war. | Source
In 1969 the Americans put men on the moon.
In 1969 the Americans put men on the moon. | Source
Robinson Crusoe.
Robinson Crusoe. | Source
Mark Twain.
Mark Twain. | Source
Miguel Cervantes.
Miguel Cervantes. | Source
Don Quixote.
Don Quixote. | Source
One of the factors that led to the defeat of the French in War and Peace was the Russian  winter.
One of the factors that led to the defeat of the French in War and Peace was the Russian winter. | Source
The Madness of war in Catch 22.
The Madness of war in Catch 22. | Source
Planet of the Apes.
Planet of the Apes. | Source
A study of the human body in Gray's Anatomy.
A study of the human body in Gray's Anatomy. | Source
Sherlock Holmes.
Sherlock Holmes. | Source
Moriarty is a well known  enemy of the fictional Sherlock Holmes.
Moriarty is a well known enemy of the fictional Sherlock Holmes. | Source
MAGIC!
MAGIC! | Source
Death is a character in The Colour of Magic.
Death is a character in The Colour of Magic. | Source
Frankenstein.
Frankenstein. | Source
The submarine.
The submarine. | Source
DRACULA!
DRACULA! | Source
Franz Kafka.
Franz Kafka. | Source
Charles Dickens wrote about poverty in 19th Century England.
Charles Dickens wrote about poverty in 19th Century England. | Source
In Cold Blood.
In Cold Blood. | Source

30 Important books

INTRODUCTION

Books don't so much change the world physically as alter our perceptions of it. For the most part, great literature does this and does it for our own good. There have been and always will be exceptions. Holy books do, undeniably, touch our world view. It doesn't matter if we believe in them or not. It is enough that a lot of people we are close to do and act accordingly or, at any rate, claim to act accordingly. Books based on real science also have touched our lives. Some come with warnings yet to be heeded.

There are books that call for rational thinking and there are also books, such as Mein Kampf, that call for the complete opposite. Not all the books listed here are necessarily good for you or for anyone. This does not mean, however, that they haven't connected with humanity in profound ways and continue to do so. Only thirty mentioned here. There are more out there.

1. The Bible

I won't try to put an age on the contents. Suffice to say that the Old Testament seems to have been put together while the Hebrews were in exile and what we refer to as the New Testament was put together in Roman times.

If the Bible is not the most widely published book in existence then it must at least be up there with the top ten. Not many of its authors come to us with biographies. The gospels attributed to the disciples were actually written up to 90 years after the events and therefore cannot be first hand accounts but what has been passed down by earlier Christians. There are elements of Paganism and Judaism in the work. There are also gospels conspicuous by their absence.

Even so, the Bible has inspired millions, possibly billions of people over the centuries. Some, such as Saint Augustine and Saint Francis of Assisi, tried to use the Bible to point the way to a better, more peaceful and loving world. During the Crusades the Bible became a reason for conquest and much bloodshed. In Martin Luther's time, thanks to the printing press, the Bible came to stand for freedom of thought and a new way of viewing what was by then an old religion. Today the Bible stands as a dynamic force for good and also for the reverse.

2. The Talmud

It is difficult to put into world the importance of these writings except to say they have been the moral compass of the Judaic-Christian world with the emphasis on the Judaic. Attempts have been made to put down or to simply destroy The Talmud but without success.

3. The Koran

Much of the world is Muslim and the Muslim faith, together with the Koran, is likely to continue to spread in the 21st Century. There are connections that can be made with Judaism and Christianity. Jesus, for example, is considered an important figure in the Koran but not as important as he is in the Bible.

4. Mein Kampf (Volume 1, 1925. Volume 2, 1926) by Adolf Hitler

In this book Hitler outlines his future plans for Germany. His hatred for the Jews and other so-called inferior races is well represented here. His views on communism and communist countries is also established. If Stalin had paid closer attention to the words in Mein Kampf he might have been just a tad bit more wary of Hitler and his ambitions when it came to Russia. Though in the book Hitler does not see the Jews as a solid race but as a religious body he, in effect, turns them into a race through acts of discrimination and finally murder. How Hitler, in the end, defines a Jew really does bring up aspects of race rather than religion. If, for example, you say you are a Christian because you practice the Christian faith you can still be considered a Jew if your father or his father was of the Jewish faith.

It is difficult to say how many people have been harmed by Mein Kampf or, for that matter, how many people have actually read it. Certainly it is an extremely hard book to read as is is full of contradictions. It is, however, a book historians should have access to since it explains much about Adolf Hitler, his views and his rise to power. On the negative side it has inspired Nazis and, after World war 2, Neo-Nazis.

During the 2nd World War a London book shop owner wrote a letter of praise for his copies of Mein Kampf. They didn't sell all that well, he had to admit, but they were thick and heavy enough to line his roof and give him some protection against the Blitz.

5. The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli (first published 1532)

This is a non-fiction blue print for success in the courts of the 16th Century. It is also a book that has remained in print and has influenced many people over the centuries. It is a philosophical work with rather dark aspects. The term Old Nick for the devil comes from the English attitude toward The Prince and its author.

6. The Origin of Species by Charles Darwin (1859)

This 19th century effort rocked the scientific world of the 19th Century and sent shock waves through some Christian theologians. Charles Darwin was amazed by the diversity of life to be found and so sought the reasons for such diversity. Was it all by chance or were there common factors? Was change a factor? Naturalist to this day owe much to Darwin's work. The need to understand our planet better came out of the writings of such men as the author of Origin of the Species. Exploration of nature got a shot in the arm by Darwin and continues to be an important area of study. It is impossible to judge the importance of this book as its influence continues to play an important role in saving our blue planet. If humans continue to inhabit this planet going into the 22nd Century and beyond it will be, in part, Darwin's doing.

7. Make Room! Make Room! by Harry Harrison (1966)

This is not the first novel to deal with human overpopulation but, so far, it has been the most influential. It has spawned a movie, Soylent Green. As we see more and more signs of stress on the planet due to increases in world population we can be assured that we were warned en masse way back in the swinging '60s.

8. The Naked Ape by Desmond Morris (1967)

This is the study of humans from a zoologist's point of view. It was never meant to be controversial. when it first came out Morris found himself not only defending his own book but the earlier work, The origin of the species by Charles Darwin. If nothing else Morris got people to think of themselves as very intelligent animals but animals nonetheless. Humans being referred to as the sexiest of primates didn't hurt sales.

9. The Population Bomb by Paul R, Ehrlich (1968)

This book warned of mass starvation in the future due to overpopulation. The only mistake made by Ehrlich was that he underestimated the ingenuity of humans and so predicted the catastrophe would occur soon after the book was published. It is, however, likely to be a 21st Century catastrophe.

10. The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (written in the 14th century, first printed in 1483)

This is the story of a group of people on a pilgrimage to Canterbury. To pass the time all of the characters tell a tale. Some of the tales are ribald in nature, others are of a noble slant and still others provide moral guidance. This book shows the written English language at a time when it was just beginning to flower. Within this mighty work are snap-shots of medieval life and thought. It bridges the gap between the way Western society is now and the way it once was.

11. The Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio (completed in 1353)

This mighty work of a hundred stories illustrates the flowering of the written Italian language in the 14th Century. Like The Canterbury tales, there are stories that are rather naughty and stories that seek to be a moral guide. The naughty stories, including the ones involving nuns and monks getting up to mischief, show a somewhat lack of regard for the Church.

12. THE TAO TE CHING by Lao Tzu (Circa 6th Century BC)

This work of Chinese origin has had great influence in the Asian part of our world and some influence in the West as well. It is full of mystical ideas meant to get the reader to feel and to experience rather than to just think. Among other things, it is a looking back to a golden age that probably never existed.

13. The Art of War by Sun Tzu (Circa 6th Century BC)

This is the oldest and most successful books ever written on military strategy. It has been a great influence on Eastern society and, from the 18th Century onwards, came to influence western thinking as well. It has inspired great leaders such as Napoleon and General Douglas MacArthur.

14. All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929)

Hitler did not care much for this novel. He viewed it as defeatist. It was burned and banned in Nazi Germany. It was written by a man who had experienced the First World War first hand and didn't like what he had experienced. It is a very good anti-war novel. if not the first to grace the 20th Century, certainly one of the best to ever be written. Told from a German soldier's perspective, it shows the hopes of the ordinary German when the war began and how those hopes came to be dashed.

15. Das Kapital by Carl Marx (1867)

This book, Das Kapital, a critical analysis of capitalism, together with his earlier work, The Communist Manifesto (1848) have made the 20th Century and, at least the beginnings of the 21st Century, a time of great social and scientific change. It should be noted that the uprising against the 'capitalist exploiters' Carl Marx thought would happen in England in the 19th Century never occurred and that Marx's ideas concerning Communism have never been put into operation as envisioned by Marx. Nevertheless, a form of communism came to be seen as a threat to the German industrialist after the First world War and so these industrialists came to support the Nazis as the alternative political movement. After the 2nd World War the rise of Russian and Chinese style communist came to threaten the West which gave rise to the Cold War. Thanks to the Cold War, the race to the moon between Russia and the USA came into effect when the Russians launched their artificial satellite, Sputnik 1 into space to circle the earth. If not for fear of communism a man might not have landed on the moon. On the other hand, if not for fear of communism, the USA and Australia might never have gotten so involved in the Vietnam War.

16. Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe (1719)

This may well be the first true novel to be published in English. Past writings relied on poetic devices so that lines could be more readily recalled. This book about a shipwrecked sailor shows faith in a large public able to read on their own without the need for someone to do it for them.

17. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (1884)

This meandering novel illustrates American literature coming of age. It is the tale of a young boy from a rough background and a runaway slave traveling along the Mississippi in search of freedom. Twain once denied that this work carried an anti-slavery message saying, instead, that it was merely an adventure yarn. Quite frankly I believe his tongue was firmly in his cheek at the time. Nevertheless this book was banned in the south despite the fact that the American Civil war had been over for some time.

18. Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes (First volume 1605, 2nd volume 1615)

This is a must read novel for anyone wishing to understand Western literature and its development. It is about a retired country gentleman who comes to believe that he is a knight on a quest. It is about madness and friendship that defies the odds. It is possibly the firs psychological novel in a European language. The first volume is the most quoted of the two volumes but the 2nd volume comes across as the more polished and thence the more readable and enjoyable. Spain the way it was in Cervantes' time and the way the knight of the sorrowful countenance would have it, are both brought to dynamic life. It should also be noted that in the 2nd book the would-be knight's companion, Sancho Panza, comes to really want the quest to be for real.

19. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy (1869)

This massive novel takes the reader from a time of peace in Russia right through the war between Russia and France. It was one of the first novels to come out of Russia to capture the imagination of more Western nations. It gives a view of the richness and the folly of Russian society in the 19th century.

20. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller ( 1961)

Set in World War 2, Catch-22 has got to be the strangest and yet one of the most powerful anti-war novels ever written. Who could forget characters like Major Major Major Major who is out when he is in and in when he is out? How about a chaplain in search of an angel or a pilot who continually crashes his plane into the sea because it is part of his plan to get out of the war?

21. La Planete des Singes (known to Americans as The Planet of the Apes) by Pierre Boulle (1963)

This is French science fiction at its best and is a commentary on humanity and where we are headed. It has spawned numerous novels, comic books and motion pictures.

22. Gray's Anatomy by Henry Gray (First published 1854)

This text on the human body has been re-edited and re-issued continuously with new information ever since it first saw the light of day. It is in its 40th edition (2008). It is to this day considered the most authoritative text on the human condition and has been useful to countless students in Great Britain, the USA, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. It has saved lives.

23. A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1888 in book form)

This is the first story to feature the great fictional detective, Sherlock Holmes. Written from the point of view of Holmes' companion, Doctor Watson, it outlines in no uncertain terms the character of Holmes. It bring to light Doyle's and naturally Holme's ideas on deductive reasoning.There have been many offshoots of Sherlock Holmes including Agatha Christie's detectives who also use deductive reasoning to solve crimes.

24. The Colour of Magic by Terry Pratchett (1983)

This is a lovely send up of the sword and sorcery sub-genre. It is also full of commentary on the 20th Century and this commentary is delivered in such absurd ways one can't help but smile knowingly at certain passages and laughing outright at others. Like his other disc world novel, it has a lot to say about the times in which the author is living in and much of it is funny. The disc world series of novels has spawned numerous movies and comic books and at least one stage play.

25. Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley (1818)

This novel about a man going too far in creating a living creature but not taking enough responsibility for his creation has spawned many a science fiction novel, motion picture and comic books. Its influence in Western culture is immense. When scientists began experiments altering the genetics of eatable plants the detractors named the resultant plants Frankenstein food.

26. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the sea by Jules Verne (1869)

This was one of the first books to be published that could be referred to as genuine science fiction. It has spawned numerous other novels about science and the sea as well as a number of movies and television shows.

27. Dracula by Bram Stoker (1887)

This novel was popular both in the late 19th Century and throughout much of the 20th Century. Up until recent times Dracula was the quintessential male blood-sucker. There have been numerous movies in which this undead character has appeared. He once appeared in an episode of the television series, Buffy, as a celebrity vampire.

28. The Trial by Franz Kafka (1925)

Going to trial becomes a process that can be avoided for a time by clever lawyers but only for a time. K, the main character, cannot escape his ultimate fate. This is an extremely dark book that makes one think of processes and how wrapped up we become in them. This novel has spawned at least one motion picture.

29. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens (1843)

This novella is a favorite among many readers and has spawned a great many movies. It has also been a highly successful stage play. The first of Dickens' famous Christmas collection, it deals with Ebenezer Scrooge and the three Christmas spirits that visit him to save his soul. it is hard to imagine a more beautiful Christmas tale. Black Adder did a marvelous send up and the 2010 Doctor Who Christmas special was a touching adaptation for a fresh, new audience.

30. In Cold Blood by Truman Capote (1966)

This book is a true account of a multiple murder, what had come before, and the aftermath. The history of the killers are examined in detail and the question of just how much society is responsible for its own criminals is examined. This book has spawned at least one movie and much debate over what makes a mass murderer.

Well, those are my 30. I hope you have enjoyed the read.

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Comments 14 comments

lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines

A delightful list. Some changed far smaller portions of the world than others, but each is rich with meaning and changed forever its portion of the world. I would love to write such a book, even if it made no money and even if the author remained anonymous.

A list of bestsellers includes some which I might put on my own list of world-changers: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_best-selling_...

The original "Harry Potter" launched an industry and captured the imaginations of a sizeable portion of the planet. With over 400 million sold from the main series, and a number of blockbuster movies, plus a theme park, this created a new world and changed ours.

Perhaps Dickens, "Tale of Two Cities" made the top of the bestseller list because it is required reading in so many classrooms, but it may be required reading because it is such a powerful story. I like Christmas Carol, but Tale of Two Cities has a much deeper, visceral soul. Scrooge has his redemption, but that of Sydney Carton's sacrifice stands as far more profound.

Lord of the Rings and the book which started it all off, Hobbit, have also created a world and changed ours--for the better, I think. I am glad I met Frodo and Bilbo Baggins.

It is true that not every bestseller "changed" the world. Many of them merely entertained us. But some of those sources of entertainment had new ideas or encapsulated ideas which, though they may have been around for ages, were not widely known or appreciated. I think Jonathan Livingston Seagull was one such book. That slender volume sold 40 million copies and continues in print in many languages. I saw a Thai version when I was in Bangkok a few years ago.

Thanks for the thought-provoking list. Well presented!


Rod Marsden profile image

Rod Marsden 5 years ago from Wollongong, NSW, Australia Author

Thanks lone77star.

For me it was a toss up between one of the Harry Potter books and one of the disc world novels. In the end I opted for disc world because the author really does reveal a lot about the times in which he lives.

I wanted to include something by Dickens and A Christmas Carol is something I view or read every year and after so many decades still enjoy. It has been adapted for many audiences. I remember an episode of Family Ties, for example, that was basically a retelling of A Christmas Carol. Scrooge remains a delightful character for any male actor to play and, I dare say, some female actor some time will find a way to play Scrooge. A Tale of two cities is a very good novel, and as you say, it has a great deal to offer the reader.

I recently re-read The Lord of the Rings. I find the moments where golem turns up the best. As for inclusion, I would think of Red Nails by Robert E. Howard first. Mind you Robert E. Howard's work isn't as well known but it is superior writing.

I enjoyed Jonathan Livingston Seagull when it first came out. It captured the age of the hippie and gave the poetic naturalist wings.


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 5 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

I have read many of these but not all.To what extent they have influenced my think I am not sure. "All quiet On the western Front' I recall reading in high school. I think the Korean war was on at that time.I was struck by the irony of it.I don't recall hiow it influenced me personally as a potential draftee.


Austinstar profile image

Austinstar 5 years ago from Somewhere in the universe

I'm glad you included Catch-22. I loved this book and it's the only WWII book I ever liked. The lessons I learned from this novel have followed me all through life and I could re-read it another 7 or 8 times.

Another book that truly influenced me was "The Source" by James Mitchner. It's rather obscure, but no less informative than all of his books. The Source is a road through "The Holy Land" and explains a great deal about religion in general.

The Harry Potter books will teach us all new thought about old ideas and they are extremely well written.

Good hub!


Rod Marsden profile image

Rod Marsden 5 years ago from Wollongong, NSW, Australia Author

dahoglund, it is always difficult to say just how certain books have influenced us directly. It is often the indirect influence that counts. All the books mentioned get quoted quite often. An American novella that had a similar impact to 'All Quiet on the Western Front' was 'The Red Badge of Courage'.

Austinstar, Catch-22 is a novel that influenced more than one generation of readers so I felt it had to be included.

I read The Source a very long time ago. It is a great book and so is Hawaii by the same author.

Yes, I like the Harry Potter books, too.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines

Another thought on Christmas Carol... As a teenager, I thoroughly enjoyed Magoo's Christmas Carol. One of my brothers and I used the sing the songs from that rendition even months after it aired on television. For several years, it seemed a seasonal favorite.

Red Badge of Courage brings back fond memories. I'm glad it was on the reading list at school. Same goes for "A Separate Peace." I still need to read Catch-22. The word "Catch-22" has a unique meaning not captured by any other term in our language--a flavor all its own, and an ironic enigma met so often in our lives.

Inventing words! Some authors seem to have a flare for adding to our vocabulary. I remember reading an article years ago about how Shakespeare invented numerous words which became standards in our lexicon. Science fiction authors tend to do this, too. One of my favorite is Heinlein's "grok," which means more than simple "understanding," but knowing something in its entirety -- perhaps what the Buddhists might call "paramita" knowledge.


Rod Marsden profile image

Rod Marsden 5 years ago from Wollongong, NSW, Australia Author

Yes, lone77star, I remember Magoo's Christmas Carol too. It was fun. I liked it more than I did Disney's version which wasn't bad.

Catch-22 is well worth reading. Don't be put off by the highly unusual structure of the novel.

Yes, Shakespeare did invent some words. He also turned some words that had always been nouns into verbs. Every time I try that trick on my own I get caned over the knuckles by my editor. Yes, Science fiction writers do make up new words that do end up in common use. I like the Red Dwarf 'smeghead' which means idiot or basic bastard. Dalek came into the English language via Doctor Who.


Jane Bovary profile image

Jane Bovary 5 years ago from The Fatal Shore

Quite a list there Rod...though there's plenty there I haven't read. Mein Kampf for example (I don't think I'll bother now. Life is short). The Prince really stands out in my memory...and in particular Machiavelli's ruthless call to *fight poison with poison*. I had to read it for European History in Year 12.

Chaucer is another one embedded in my mind ...part of my tertiary English course. I'm sure these books and others did influence my life in some way.

Good job.


Rod Marsden profile image

Rod Marsden 5 years ago from Wollongong, NSW, Australia Author

Thanks for stopping by, Jane.

Mein Kampf is difficult but it is something every historian interested in WW2 should try to read at least once.

Poison as a political way to get ahead dates back to Roman times. Certainly it was part of medieval life and death and Machiavelli was aware of this.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa

Heningway once said that everything one read stayed with one, even if one could not remember it. This is a great list and I thoroughly enjoyed the read, thank you.

One small point - the title of Darwin's great book is "The Origin of Species" no "The Species" as it is so often called by the anti-evolutionists.

Thanks again for a super read.

Love and peace

Tony


Rod Marsden profile image

Rod Marsden 5 years ago from Wollongong, NSW, Australia Author

Thanks tony. I've made that change. Call it a type-o.


kumarlaltu profile image

kumarlaltu 2 years ago from Bhubaneswar

Its a long list of very informative and precise information,loved it.


Rod Marsden profile image

Rod Marsden 2 years ago from Wollongong, NSW, Australia Author

Thanks kumarlaltu.


Rod Marsden profile image

Rod Marsden 14 months ago from Wollongong, NSW, Australia Author

The damned correction robot doesn't like The Tao Te Ching. The idiot mechanism wants to change it to The Tao The Ching. Look it up! IT IS THE TAO TE CHING!

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