Frame Two: This Sensual Splash of Visual Haiku

The Spirit of the Art Lies Within.

The Samurai Yanone by Hasegawa
The Samurai Yanone by Hasegawa | Source

Welcome To: Frame Two.

Original Haiku by Pearldiver

An excellent haiku should be written to provide the reader with the opportunity to visualize and completely sense a specific moment. Haiku should be traditionally all about the events and spirit of nature. That moment in the life of nature may only be a tree shedding a leaf for example, yet a perfect haiku will describe the event as if that very moment in time is life changing, which indeed it could be if the haiku is good enough to capture it. The reader must be able to feel, to gauge the moment, as if they are experiencing that instance along with the entirety of its environment first hand.

Therefore, a haiku should not be written as a vehicle for ‘reporting’ a scene in past tense, or written in such a way as to leave the reader thinking; “Yes, but so what!” If that is how the verse is presented, or expected to be read, then the very purpose of writing haiku has been ignored by an author who is not skillful enough to comprehend or work within the living spirit of this ancient art form. As such, that living spirit dictates that each haiku is a frame in the life of nature; simple yet complexly unique, moving independently yet in tune with its environment, a stand alone event balanced in time. To hold a powerful beauty like that found in Netsuke. Ultimately, the haiku must be the living spirit and can only achieve that status with a level of mastery that clearly provides nourishment to the life flow living and described within the haiku.

Copyright © 2011 - 2013 Pearldiver nzpol with all rights reserved

Here within Frame Two the author has attempted to consider the spirit of each Woodblock Print and apply it in haiku to that moment within each work. The skill in the exercise comes from not doing so, in past tense or as a review of the print. What has been considered is the need to nourish the spirit of the scene and the likely thoughts of those with the scene, as if they were actually writing the haiku. In essence Pearldiver is attempting to bring the woodblock print to life; a task not so hard, when the master printers featured here, have so skillfully locked life into their print. Yes, but so what? Well let’s see what that life and spirit can actually say. Enjoy Frame Two.

♥ Original Haiku by Pearldiver ♥

Copyright © 2011 - 2013 Pearldiver nzpol with all rights reserved

Haiku - about living the moment.

Night fisherman #2 - Woodblock by Shotei
Night fisherman #2 - Woodblock by Shotei | Source

Just offshore fishing

Clever lantern light dances

Master fisherman

oo0oo

Standing on the hill

A fisherman’s ghostly face

Broken light shadows

oo0oo

Golden rays of light

Setting out and searching

Market fare to trade

oo0oo

Dark inky seas heaving

Fishing boats riding swells

Large arrow squid

oo0oo

Black nights over Sado

Dipping nets and bamboo lures

Hungry birds waking

Copyright © 2011 - 2013 Pearldiver nzpol with all rights reserved

Winter fisherman - Woodblock by Hasui (released after his death).
Winter fisherman - Woodblock by Hasui (released after his death). | Source

New snow joins old snow

Perfect fish time together

Old fathers stay home

oo0oo

White cherry blossoms

Covering the world with hope

Fishing in the snow

Copyright © 2011 - 2013 Pearldiver nzpol with all rights reserved

More modern woodblock prints.

2nd - Woodblock by Matsubara.
2nd - Woodblock by Matsubara. | Source

What is being depicted?


Colors form shapes

Nature through a prism

Seasons dance as one


♥ Original Haiku by Pearldiver ♥

Copyright © 2011 - 2013 Pearldiver nzpol with all rights reserved

Hokusai - True Master of Print.

Limitations - Woodblock print by Hokusai.
Limitations - Woodblock print by Hokusai. | Source

In view of Mt.Fuji

The master and his students

Cormorants fishing

oo0oo

Testing limitations

On the edge of long wet rocks

Dawn until lunchtime

Copyright © 2011 - 2013 Pearldiver nzpol with all rights reserved

Hope you enjoyed these haiku.

- Thanks -
- Thanks - | Source

Thanks for reading Frame Two.

Thank you for taking the time to read these haiku. I hope that you also appreciated the power of the Japanese Woodblock Print Masters Hasegawa, Shotei, Hasui, Matsubara and Hokusai. The dates of these works range from between 1780 - Current and though styles may have changed over that period, the principles of the original carvers and printers really have not.

If you enjoyed Frame Two: This sensual splash of visual haiku... please take the time to mark the frame and/or leave a comment. Take care.

Copyright © 2011 - 2013 Pearldiver nzpol with all rights reserved

* Pearldiver *

Natural beauty sometimes lies in unlikely places when you look.

Turn me to soup.
Turn me to soup. | Source

Kindly Don't Steal My Copyrighted Articles!

Source

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Thank you for leaving a comment. 18 comments

mathira profile image

mathira 4 years ago from chennai

Your hub was a good one about Haiku.The pictures and the samples of haiku were excellent.


Pearldiver profile image

Pearldiver 4 years ago from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. Author

Hello mathi, thank you for reading and commenting on this haiku collection. I'm glad that you liked frame two in the series of ten.. they get better as they go along. I appreciate your support mathi.. cheers you take care.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Rob, how refreshing to see someone who actually knows and understands what haiku is! I am no expert but have been saddened by many incorrect concepts of the art form and worse examples of it.

Haiku are not, as you say, reports of events and certainly not reports of the writer's feelings. They are impersonal other than coming from the writer's original observance of a part of universal nature. I'm a bit rushed right now, but look forward to revisiting and really immersing attention in the haiku you've written and fhe prints with which they are teamed.

It should be required reading for anyone attempting to write in the art form.


Pearldiver profile image

Pearldiver 4 years ago from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. Author

Hi Nellieanna, I appreciate your observations and share your concerns in regard to what is really being undermined by many who just have no idea what an ancient art form actually represents! Many are merely trying to create pages on the net, to attach advertising to, without any thought, understanding or talent.

I also am certainly no expert, though I do believe my understanding is deeper than most on this site and has been forged on many years of studying martial arts, many Asian Art formats and philosophies. I also believe that all our cultures are vastly different and we Must Understand exactly how and why; if we are ever going to maintain genuine historical integrity, or merely learn how to respect others and their contributions to the world that we All Share.

I thank you for your vote of confidence and recommendation... You take care and enjoy these times.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Rob - ah, yes. Also many just see haiku as a short verse and maybe have some idea of how many syllables it's to have, but totally miss the idea behind it and the kind of input it is to represent. It does have much in common with martial arts and many other formal rituals and practices of those ancient times - many, I'm sure, still in practice in Asian cultures now.

YES! There's a crying need for mutual understanding between diverse cultures. We're all rather closely arranged on this small planet and getting along involves respecting and caring about each other's cultures, rather than belittling and/or insulting them as is too often done. I'm ashamed to admit that the "Western World", of which I'm a member, seems most guilty of that. Even as a youngster, I was appalled seeing movies depicting our people as tourists or soldiers in other countries showing either arrogance or contempt toward the others, perhaps both -- and its being accepted as a 'norm'! I didn't fully understand its full implications, but felt my insides tighten when I observed it. Then is was bad; now that the world has 'shrunk' - it is dangerous and pathetic.

I'm happy to see you presenting things in a better balanced way!


prettydarkhorse profile image

prettydarkhorse 4 years ago from US

You are the master of haiku. Beautiful!!

I came here as well to greet you Merry Christmas, Happy New Year and Happy Boxing Day. May you always be safe, happy and healthy for the coming year!

Take care.


Pearldiver profile image

Pearldiver 4 years ago from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. Author

Hi again Nellieanna, thanks for those wise words. Perhaps, we the poets have a collective ability to hijack all the better words and release them only on good behavior bonds. Maybe then... the 'almost poets' could see their work from our perspective (the readers) and make an effort to raise their games! I'm sure it has a lot to do with advertising revenue expectations Nellieanna. Maybe we can just write at own levels and rejoice that such efforts tend to highlight those who do know how to write! Hope your Christmas was fine... you take care out there!


Pearldiver profile image

Pearldiver 4 years ago from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. Author

Hi Maita, you are so lovely and a terrible fibber... I am not the master of Haiku.. Thank you for caring and for your kindness. I hope your holidays have been really good and that you have had some time with those that you love. I am lucky that I have met good people like you Maita.. you take care and know that it's mutual. Be well my friend and thank you for liking my work... you gave me excellent directions!


Cara.R profile image

Cara.R 4 years ago from New York

I am very new to poetry and all of my poems, so far, rhyme. I try not to make it child like but it's as if my brain gets stuck. This was a great hub and I look forward to trying to create my first Haiku.


Lita C. Malicdem profile image

Lita C. Malicdem 4 years ago from Philippines

I taught Haiku writing, the level of school children. And every kid wanted to write his own, guided by the set standards of how it should be written. The children enjoyed it more with accompanying drawings where poetry and art meet.


Pearldiver profile image

Pearldiver 4 years ago from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. Author

Hi Cara, thanks for reading this work and leaving a comment. Like anything in life it takes a while to develop to a level beyond the starting point. The main thing is that you started and now dependent on your efforts, you will learn far more than you could ever imagine. With haiku though... take your time and study what it represents to those who created the genre and to the culture and audience that have had a bearing on the development of Haiku. When you know that, then you will begin to know haiku. So many don't and have therefore, no realistic sense of depth and required skills!

Good on you... believe in you and you will believe in what you do and write. Take care.


Cara.R profile image

Cara.R 4 years ago from New York

Thanks Pearldiver,

I have some more reading and studying to do and looking forward to it! Thanks for the sincere and helpful comment.


Pearldiver profile image

Pearldiver 4 years ago from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. Author

Hi Lita, thank you for taking the time to read this Haiku frame. Yes there are several teaching techniques based on Haiku and its affinity to visualization, which makes it very suitable for young minds. A bit like teaching patience with a fishing rod, isn't it? Very valuable lessons in life. Take care and cheers for appreciating the power of haiku.


Pearldiver profile image

Pearldiver 4 years ago from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. Author

You are most welcome Cara. Enjoy the journey it is different for all of us, so don't rush it or miss the best bits! Take care and make luck fit your words.


dragonbear profile image

dragonbear 4 years ago from Essex UK

Great Hub - I'm learning about Haiku, this has been a great help and inspiration.


Pearldiver profile image

Pearldiver 4 years ago from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. Author

Hi dragonbear, thanks for reading this work and your comment. Well if you are learning and reading my haiku as part of that process, then I appreciate that you find my work worthy of the lessons! Enjoy the experience.. take care.


LaThing profile image

LaThing 4 years ago from From a World Within, USA

Very informative..... I had no idea that haiku was about nature! I think I messed it all up! Never took it in school.... Wasn't interested in it! Your hub is very interesting!


Pearldiver profile image

Pearldiver 4 years ago from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. Author

Hi LaThing, thank you for your positive comments... yes Haiku is basically written to describe moments in nature, its moods and beauty. Senryu is the alternative that is generally used to write on people, humor, political and social issues.. basically everything else. I didn't know anything about it either, other than what little I learned of its use in battle by the Samurai, when studying Japanese culture, arts and martial arts... it wasn't until I started writing poetry that I really understood the art of Haiku and Origami boulders ... thanks for finding this interesting...

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