Vibrant Horizons

CLVII.

Deep Sunset - at the ranch, Oct., 2004 〰©Nellieanna H. Hay
Deep Sunset - at the ranch, Oct., 2004 〰©Nellieanna H. Hay | Source


There are many vibrant views of wondrous horizons around the globe, both real and imaginary; but I shall focus on some at the ranch in SW Texas which are most dear to me. It was in this vicinity that I got my start and was molded into the person I am during all my summers growing up there and absorbing its vastness .

I named it "The Flying Dutchman" in honor of Dad, whose nickname that was, given him by Mother, because of his German-Dutch-Swiss lineage and active, robust on-the-go character.

Condemned  Flying Dutchman ghost ship ~
Condemned Flying Dutchman ghost ship ~
My own Senta's Leap ~
My own Senta's Leap ~

There's also a 'soft spot' for the Wagnerian opera by that name, with several features named accordingly, such as "Senta's Leap". The hapless captain of the ghost ship, is condemned to roam the seas forever until he is truly beloved by someone. Senta loves him, and proves it by flinging herself off a sharp cliff into the raging sea.

The ranch has just such a cliff overlooking a deep dry Outlaw Canyon carved by an ancient sea. Imagine a ghostly ship being thrown about among its crags!

But, that's another story. . . .

Now ~ some vibrant vistas, mystic music, sweeping moods, pensive poetry ~ inspired by the panorama.



I can't remember not seeing these mountains on my horizon.

Distant  Sierra Madre Occidenal in Old Mexico viewed from the ranch compound.  Sometimes they look blue, sometimes purple, always breathtaking.  As a child, I thought everyone had a view of distant mountains like this!
Distant Sierra Madre Occidenal in Old Mexico viewed from the ranch compound. Sometimes they look blue, sometimes purple, always breathtaking. As a child, I thought everyone had a view of distant mountains like this! | Source



The ridge of distant peaks

Chews up, spits out

That resplendent,

Reshaped horizontal line,

Sumptuous and sublime.


They redefine

The view;

All old,

All new,

All ways ~

It's mine.

〰©Nellieanna H. Hay















A shadowy path winds

Through dreamy purple shadows;

Leads on toward blue-purple sky

Hovering o'er an undulating line

Of purple mountains, -

Distant, serpentine,

On Earth's edge, ready to engage

A mystery, fantasy,

A blanket enclosing that horizon

In subtle scents of tender lavender

And heady sage.


〰©Nellieanna H. Hay

9-1-13


Each moment presents

Its own surpassing horizon:

Quiet and placid

Or boisterous and vivid;

Caressing or disturbing,

Soothing or cajoling;

Changing with the hour,

Altering with the season.

Rejecting, clinging;

Keeping, holding;

Coddling, scolding;

Shattering, bringing

Its own reason;

Ever ushering in another

And another, -

Each soaked in light,

Stoked with power.


〰©Nellieanna H. Hay

9-1-13

Among my favorite vistas.

A lone Spanish Dagger sillouhuetted against a far horizon at day's end at the ranch.
A lone Spanish Dagger sillouhuetted against a far horizon at day's end at the ranch. | Source


Perspective line-on-line, -

Melting into nothingness,

A common touch.


Somewhere else,

Rows of buildings outline

A steamy street or rocky ocean wall,

Then diminish from the near to far,

From large to small

From here to there

And vanish into unseen distance

Without a trace,

Into - - that same vast somewhere, -

Ever-receding

Always proceeding

Curvature of Earth

Which we mere mortals call 'horizon'.


Is it illusion?

Is there such?

Or is there only our own limitation,

A mere intimation

Of what is real,

Observed from our small place?


〰©Nellieanna H. Hay

9-2-13


Each road leading toward its horizon is magical.

Just inside the entry gate on the east boundary, my road begins. . .
Just inside the entry gate on the east boundary, my road begins. . . | Source
. . .on beyond the vanishing road in the prior photo, my road dramatically proceeds westward further onto the ranch; the ranch compound at ranch's center, too distant to be visible on that distant horizon.
. . .on beyond the vanishing road in the prior photo, my road dramatically proceeds westward further onto the ranch; the ranch compound at ranch's center, too distant to be visible on that distant horizon. | Source
North road leads from compound toward the north boundary, off on the horizon.
North road leads from compound toward the north boundary, off on the horizon. | Source
West road leads from compound toward the western boundary there on the far horizon.
West road leads from compound toward the western boundary there on the far horizon. | Source
The various other internal roads toward the south do not exit the ranch, being bordered there by a major canyon. This road is lined with blooming ceniza, (purple sage), and leads toward the horizon rising above canyons in relief.
The various other internal roads toward the south do not exit the ranch, being bordered there by a major canyon. This road is lined with blooming ceniza, (purple sage), and leads toward the horizon rising above canyons in relief. | Source
Craggy mesquite and thorny brush silhouette the horizon, then yield to soft pastel skies' billowing surprise and delight!
Craggy mesquite and thorny brush silhouette the horizon, then yield to soft pastel skies' billowing surprise and delight! | Source
"Dawn With You"
"Dawn With You" | Source



Shall I reveal

All I feel?

That the light in your eyes, my love,

In precious memory ~

Is another kind of horizon that I see.


Each beloved horizon ~

More vibrant,

More dear,

More beloved,

More inviting,

More real

Than any other on this Earth

To me!


〰©Nellieanna H. Hay

9-2-13

Ever-amazing, even a scruffy foreground ls eaten up by the brilliance of another of  my ranch's vibrant horizons, as seen from the compound!
Ever-amazing, even a scruffy foreground ls eaten up by the brilliance of another of my ranch's vibrant horizons, as seen from the compound! | Source

© 2013 Nellieanna Hay

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Comments 57 comments

Mhatter99 profile image

Mhatter99 3 years ago from San Francisco

From your heart to mine. thank you


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Ah - Martin. . . and back from mine to yours - thank YOU! :-)


bravewarrior profile image

bravewarrior 3 years ago from Central Florida

Nellieana, what beautiful vistas! The photos are amazing, as is your watercolor. Your poetry is very wistful, yet appreciative of the glorious land around you. I truly enjoyed this!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Shauna, your words speak to me and I appreciate them.

One is both amazed and humbled by the grandeur and variety of nature which reflect its artist's creative genius.

If I am a bit wistful, it's partly because I so seldom get to feast my eyes to behold and treat my feet to walk around this beloved place. It's all there proclaiming its majesty, but I am here, - 500 miles from it, - living in less remote environs, though looking forward to a trip before too long, to see firsthand what its caregivers have been giving it.


billybuc profile image

billybuc 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

Beautiful as always Nellieanna! My goodness, you are way out there, aren't you? That is some incredible country. Thanks for taking us on a tour of the ranch and sharing your love of it.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Yes and no, Billy. It is way out there, for sure and is ever beckoning, but I'm seldom way out there these days. George & I spent at least half our time down there every year for about 15 years after it became mine. We built a cabin ourselves and had the most wonderful times, working and taking it all in.

There's nowhere on Earth where the night sky is more splendid! He'd never seen such rugged remote countryside except during his WWII experience in the South Pacific. He fell in love with it too, and surely loved it almost as much as I, though I had nearly 60 years of loving it on him!

After awhile, though, his health made it too risky to be so far from civilization & any kind of help. The closest official is about 90 miles away in the small and only non-ghost town, Sanderson, in the large county. Responding to an emergency is not done, except by the Game Warden, or perhaps the Border Patrol or Highway Patrol, but they're hard to reach unless they just happen by, which is rarely. One's location is by longitude and latitude, rather than street address! For any kind of medical help (or supplies, for that matter) - it's 100 miles to the modest next county-seat, Del Rio.

So now I just felt it was time to give it some recognition on my Hubsite! Of course, there's much more to it! I've several pages about it on my own website and on a beginning of a website of its own.

Thank you for visiting and enjoying it. Hugs!


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 3 years ago from South Africa

Nellieanna, there are so many true paradises on this planet, each and every one with its own beauty. We never stop loving what we had learned to love (and accept) during the first 7 years of our life - there where our roots are. I wonder about people who were born and raised in a crowded concrete jungle - are they able to appreciate unspoilt nature? Are they able to see the beauty of a semi-desert, not to talk about a real desert comprising only sand and rocks?

BeAuTiFuL pictures and poems!

At present our semi-desert is covered with a carpet of wild flowers of all colours. After this explosion of colours the region will look very much like your favourite valley in Texas.


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 3 years ago from Asheville, NC

Quite beautiful - I'm glad I stopped by.


shanmarie profile image

shanmarie 3 years ago from Texas

I especially enjoyed the last two poems. The pictures are stunning as well. I miss traveling because of sites like these.


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

Oh Wow Nellieanna! What beautiful photos and poems. You are so lucky to have lived in such an amazing place! I can see why you say you had to move because of the distance, but your memories must be amazing too, wonderful!


wayne barrett profile image

wayne barrett 3 years ago from Clearwater Florida

Very beautiful work, and beautiful images. I come from Central California, but the scenery actually looks almost identical. My grandfather was born in Texas. It took me two days to drive through on my way to Florida.


cat on a soapbox profile image

cat on a soapbox 3 years ago from Los Angeles

I have always enjoyed the rugged terrain with its rocks, gullies and fragrant scrub because it is a place of shadow magic and imagination. Your expressive poems, art, and photography are like jewelry on a beautiful woman! The ever-changing moods of the sky and "a blanket enclosing that horizon

In subtle scents of tender lavender

And heady sage." Stunning imagery! Thank you for sharing these memories and observations from your life.

Love the music too!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Martie, Thank you! That's so true, that we love forevermore our earliest exposures. It's a well-known fact that a person's exposures of the first 7 years become integral parts of the person from then on, applying to both the physical and the intangible affiliations which are internalized during those early years when a person is like a sponge, absorbing the environment and its relationship to him/herself with little preconceptions, except as those are being learned simultaneously.

Yes, one wonders how persons born into and raised in crowded concrete jungles, and/or among violence and negativity can really ever fully appreciate or understand anything else, except possibly as a mere spectator, not really personally. I suppose there are parks and, possibly beaches within access for many of those crowded concrete environs, but for too many in those places, even those are beyond access.

My countryside at the ranch is considered semi-desert. Average annual rainfall is eleven inches and drought is a constant condition. When there are rains, the water quickly drains off via the network of draws and canyons ending up in the Rio Grande, not too far to the south. There is NO permanent surface water on my place, nor many other places in the county. The one water source is the 712--foot deep well located in the compound with miles of pipe carrying water to many remote troughs around the place. My Dad drilled that well and most of the other older wells in the area, which then were fueled by windmills, but since have deep-well pumps. Caring for the water system is a major responsibility. When there is livestock, that's their source of water. But it is always the major source for the wildlife, of which there is an abundance.

Oh, yes - wildflowers are part of the landscape, too! The purple ceniza bursts into bloom everywhere after a rain. The cactus in bloom is gorgeous, plus there are numerous other species of wildflowers. The scents are always amazing. I'm glad I have 'memory' for scents! They're as much a part of the place as the more visible features! This hub was about horizons, so other kinds of features weren't included, but the flora and fauna are magnificent, in their own semi-tropical, semi-desert kind of way!

Thanks again, Martie. I love hearing from you! I sense that our countrysides have much in common, give or take some exclusively native-habitat species and other features!


Vellur profile image

Vellur 3 years ago from Dubai

Beautiful!! Your words have painted a pretty picture about the beauty of Mother Nature. Great poems, voted up.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Hello, suziecat - I'm glad you stopped by, too. What a pleasure, hearing from you! Thank you!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Shan - Thank you! I'm truly glad you enjoyed it!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Nell, I'm so pleased you liked my photos and poems! Thank you! Yes, I feel lucky to have experienced life there. However living there when I was growing up was actually on the headquarters ranch, rather than the one I now own. They're separated by another ranch. My place was added as a supplementary range for the livestock, and so lacked the ranch house and many other added features with which I grew up. Otherwise, though, the views are typical of both.

I've never lived there full-time, year-round. Very early, before I was born and when my siblings were pre-school was the only time the entire family lived there year-round. It's too far from any schools, which were a major necessity, so we always also maintained a second home in town, where we stayed during the school year while there were any of us in school. Dad would just commute back and forth the distance between ranch and town (100 miles). Sometimes both parents would need to be out there, during which times, I stayed with friends, often my first-grade teacher, which was always sort of a treat. My much older siblings were soon grown and on their own by the time I started school. But as soon as school was out in May and until it started again in September, my parents and I stayed there all summer and seldom, if ever, all went to town for that duration. Rarely, Dad would need to go into town on business and to replenish supplies for the workers, but, mostly, the foods we took with us had to last the 3 months, When the fresh produce supply was exhausted, we relied on less perishable forms and a few onions and peppers a rocky garden could grow.

Those, too, were precious memories of it for me! It was primitive in the sense that there were no electricity or gas utilities. Mother cooked on a wood stove and light was from kerosene lamps and lanterns. Of course, there was no refrigeration and ice was something one craved! There was no indoor plumbing, so it was the old outhouse. For bathing, a washtub in the kitchen floor, with the cold well water heated by a teakettle on the wood stove! What fun! The benefits far outweighed the inconveniences!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Hello, Wayne and thank you for stopping by. I've visited extended family in Sacramento, and yes - it's similar. In what part of Texas was your grandfather born?

Your mention of it taking two days to drive through my state makes me smile. I've heard other non-natives mention that! :-) It is quite a distance across. What can add to the challenge - (or there was a time it could) - was when there were no overnight stopovers, no towns along the way with motels! I remember when motels were called "tourist camps" and the mental picture that term may generate is probably not too far 'off'! - haha! Now, fortunately, interstates are more likely to have overnight facilities sprinkled along them. Even so, they may be wide apart in western parts of the state. Fortunately, now, one can locate and even preschedule those stops via the internet.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Catherine, how nice to see you. What a beautiful comment! Thank you. I just refreshed my memory by checking your Hubpage, and am all the more pleased that your strong interest in nature and its stewardship appreciated my hub. It's especially pleasant to share my love of 'this old land' with others who appreciate nature where and as it 'is', not just theoretically.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Vellur, thank you! Yes, Mother Nature is beautiful and varied! So is friendship. Glad to call you one of mine!


leni sands profile image

leni sands 3 years ago from UK

Completely blown away with your words and pictures - awesome Nellieanna. Voted up, etc.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Thank you, Leni Sands! So happy that you liked it! Thank you forth votes!


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 3 years ago from New York

It is easy to see all of this is from the heart Nellieanna. The memories you paint with your words match the pictures you took with your camera. Beauty both within and without. I am a firm believer we see beauty with out hearts and the warm memories we carry make a place more beautiful than even the eye can see.

Your words reach the heart as well and add to the beautiful picture we see in this hub.

Voted up, awesome, and beautiful.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Mary - oh, it's good to hear that my heartfelt motive is transparent! There is so much heart in it, it's nearly indescribable. It's also good to see the love others feel for their own heritage and its places.

We probably view these beloved places through slightly rose-colored glasses and imbue them with extra measures of beauty and charm; but that's OK, too. There should be a more special aura around one's beloved treasures of the heart! It's really nice when it's possible to share that! Thank you for your lovely comments and the votes! - hugs!


Vincent Moore 3 years ago

Such beauty beholds ones eyes, the vistas of lines, colors, vastness, backdrops of sublime beauty. To think that your ranch gives up all this beauty that surround it, you my dear and George in spirit are one each time you visit there. The memories, the sights and sounds, the winds, the rain, every element fulfills the beauty, it's timeless. Simply enchanting the photos and videos you include with your magnificent and tender verse. Bravo, it's a reminder that Heaven appears on earth for many of us, your Flying Dutchman Ranch appears to be blessed as such a place. Hugs


jhamann profile image

jhamann 3 years ago from Reno NV

Thank you for sharing your heart and your poetry, an experience that will fill my memory with joy. Jamie


BlossomSB profile image

BlossomSB 3 years ago from Victoria, Australia

Wonderful photos to accompany your lovely, heartfelt poetry.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Vincent, as a kid, en route to the 'Headquarters ranch' -- or the "Old Ranch" as we sometimes called it, we always traveled through this "New Ranch" that would become my Flying Dutchman eventually. Only when we reached the compound area, did I realize it was our own"New Ranch" but I didn't really have a grasp of where it began or ended. But when little Nellieanna and her parents entered the premises in the Model T, and the first sight we encountered was that sweeping vista shown in the second "road" picture, it was like approaching The Emerald City to me. It seems to present the panorama of it all like a gift at one's feet and always gave me a thrill. I would envy whomever owned it!

Even when it first became mine, it took awhile to become fully aware of its parameters. I studied maps and landmarks and George and I spent many days exploring the actual place, locating & pinpointing what the maps showed. We explored both by truck and on foot, till almost every nook and cranny, draw and canyon was thoroughly familiar as I took the measure of the land into myself.

I named every draw and internal pasture like my beloved children. We both instantly knew exactly where Senta's Leap, The Rose Garden, Elcy, Lazaro, West Virginia, Bandalero, The Scruffies, to name only a few, - were by name. Soon others involved with the ranch were recognizing the features by name. The only 'official' name of a feature on the place, though, is Outlaw Canyon. Apparently that was where desperadoes of yesterday literally hid out from the Law, though risking rattlesnake bites in the bargain!

There are countless experiences and stories from my childhood and all the way into my 'golden years' about many details one wouldn't imagine by a mere impression.

So thank you, my friend, for your sense of some of those, just from my photos and verses on this hub!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Jamie, thank you for your visit and very kind words! I couldn't be more pleased than to think this creates a lasting memory for you, as well.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Hello, Blossom! Thank you for coming by! I appreciate your enjoyment of this hub!

When I see photos of your amazing country, I'm awed completely!


shanmarie profile image

shanmarie 3 years ago from Texas

Oh, dang! I wrote site instead of sight!!


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

That sounds wonderful Nellieanna, to live like that even if only ever so often sounds absolutely wonderful to me, living in England its so much closer to everybody else, and even though we were pretty poor back then and used basic amenities we never had such a wonderful remote place, nell


Kathryn Stratford profile image

Kathryn Stratford 3 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

This is beautiful! I liked your personal introduction, the pretty photos, the stunning poetry, and the picture of the water color. I enjoy watching the horizon, and seeing the landscape in different parts of the country, and this has been a pleasure to see. Even your dividers are creative! Well done, and I am glad I came over here to check out some of your work.

Have a wonderful weekend, and thanks for sharing this with us.

~ Kathryn


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Nell, my impression of that proximity to everyone in England was similar to my impression of New England here. I felt a kind of intimacy in them which small towns in Texas totally lack. Here, streets are wide, houses are set way back and are surrounded by space. One feels that deliberate effort is required even to touch or to meet neighbors, whereas up there and over there, when one comes into a village, it immediately feels like entereing someone's garden, where one feels very likely to meet its owner. The contrast really struck me.

My description of how lacking in amenities it was back then was simply the way all working ranches were, at least in our part of the country. Rural electricity hadn't been introduced, so there was no electricity in such rural locations. Pretty much the same for modern plumbing in rural areas. And it was VERY rural, unlike farms closer to towns. It still is remote, but those things have come to the area for people who live there.

Water will always be from wells, I've no doubt, though pumping it has progressed from windmills to electric pumps, which are more efficient, though more expensive. Wind is abundant and constant!

I was about 10 when I watched the Rio Grande Electric Company stringing up the poles and power lines across miles and miles of rugged land to get to our one compound, so unlike in towns where whole neighborhoods are served. The phone company that serves the vast area out there is the Big Bend Telephone Company, located in Alpine, about 170 miles from my place. Back then, phones could be had, but it took miles of lines for just one location and was very costly. We had no phone on the headquarters ranch when was growing up.

Since then, (and I'm talking about about 70 years since then!) telephone service has gone through being via microwave and now has become via satellite, so distance isn't a factor except when one needs repairs! The phone company still has that long trip to the location, are amazingly prompt.

We've had a phone line there since I first got the place. There happened to be a phone line already strung across it, going to another ranch, so we didn't have to pay that initial cost. Of course TV and internet out there is strictly by satellite, if one has them. George & I got satellite TV out there but weren't there full-time enough to justify internet. We used the same TV satellite service out there and in town. Just had dishes both places and carried the 'box' back and forth with us.

Another pervailing factor when I was a kid was the Great Depression. Every penny coming in was produced by the ranch and had to go into its mortgage before all else. Mother made my siblings clothes from old clothes and sometimes they didn't last more than a wearing or two; so she was constantly sewing - on a treadle sewing machine, on which I learned to sew!

Abut again, that was almost a general condition, at least for those willing to sacrifice some of the 'niceties' for their goals. My parents were accustomed to it. It didn't especially feel like being poor, though I guess we were. Many folks who weren't willing to go those extra steps simply lost their ranches during that depression, in fact. Dad was proud that we didn't. Mother cut many corners and did without luxuries.

She used to say that Dad never wasted money on luxuries and she never wasted it on necessities, so between them, of course they could manage on very little 'cash flow'.- haha! She was an artist and painted lovely pictures of it all. So, of course, the place provided our treasures, as you/ve perceived. Much about it still which whispers these things to me. :-)


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Katherine, thank you! I love various countrysides, too. The wonders of Nature are simply thrilling.

I appreciate your mention of my work and notice of my dividers! Of course, I have fun putting together a hub. Thank you for coming by and letting me know!


livingsta profile image

livingsta 3 years ago from United Kingdom

Beautiful Lines Nellieanna and wonderful photos too. Thank you for sharing this with us. :-)


Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

Gypsy Rose Lee 3 years ago from Riga, Latvia

Voted up and awesome. This was an incredible colorful, picturesque, and poetic journey Nell. Enjoyed much. Hugs and passing this on.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida

Your phenomenal, panoramic photos are matched only by your magical poetry, Nellieanna. What a beautiful, wondrous place you have shared with us. Thank you for this pleasure.

The pastel photo dated Sept. '04 takes my breath away. Just like your poetry, m'dear.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Livingsta, thank you! I just peeked at your profile. It was a bit like looking in a mirror, so many interests in common! :-)

I truly thank you for visiting my hub!


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

Thanks Nellianna, even though we lived and still live in a small town/village, my gran and grandad always made everything. Back then it was such a poor village. My gran always made my mums and aunts coats, dresses and so on, and the good thing was that back then all the neighbors chipped in to help with babysitting, making clothes, exchanging food that they had grown and so on. I do think we have lost something special ever since we have become so called modern. the neighbors keep to themselves and the friendliness has gone, we may be a rich village now, but its just not the same anymore.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Rasma, I'm delighted that you've found this enjoyable, and certainly, that you came by! Hugs and many thanks!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dr. BJ- It does my heart (and ego) good to read your lovely comments! Yes, it is quite an incredible place. My pleasure to share. I think you refer to the billowing pink cloud photo, - am I right? Thank you so much.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Oh Nell, that is so true. Communities were like extended families. Even on these remote, widely spaced miles in the ranch country, when shearing time came 'round, all the neighboring ranchers would be right behind the shearing crew coming in, so they could help with the roundup and all the extra chores involved. Mother would feed everyone, with meals made on the wood cook stove and they'd sit at long tables with long wooden benches. If anyone had a flat out on the road, someone would stop and offer help. In town, kids were safe out playing because all the moms would be watching out for all the kids. Now people just seem too busy and preoccupied to notice even who lives next door, much less offer them a hand or a welcome. Something of great value has been lost and replaced with some things of merely 'showy' value, as my dad called such things. But I suppose that just makes it a better field in which to plant some kindness! ;-)


Gwen/prior hubber 3 years ago

A masterpiece, that's what it is. I may no longer write here, but I will check in on my friends from time to time. ; ) Beautiful, Nellieanna...as always!! (dreamseeker2-once upon a time).


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Thank you, Gwen. I'm honored that you wish to check in on my hub and that you consider it so worthwhile! Of course, I'm sad to think that you'll not be writing here. The best in what you've decided to do, though! You will be greatly missed! Hugs.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

Straight from a heart so wise and a heart so warm.

Each poem says so much about you my talented friend. Here's to so many more gems from you and I wish you a wonderful day.

Eddy.


brakel2 profile image

brakel2 3 years ago from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Hi Nellianna. Wow! The beauty of the scenery and the expressive words in your poetry are awesome. This must be where you grew up but now live elsewhere. Your life has been so full of beauty and experiences. If you haven't written a book, you need to. Your hub makes my day! Thanks for sharing a part of your life. Voted up and shared. Blessings. Audrey


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Eddy - I so much appreciate that you visit my hubs and that you find value in them. Your words mean a great deal to me. Yes, this is very much straight from the heart. Thank you.

A wonderful day to you, too, my friend.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Hello again, brakel2. Now I'm going to venture to call you Audrey, if I may be so bold. Thank you so much for your kind words.

I do live elsewhere, - in Dallas, which is 500 miles from the ranch. But that is where I grew up, though, as I've explained in other comments, it's a different part of the family ranch, the headquarters of which was where I spent so much of my childhood. My ranch was simply an overflow range for more sheep and goats until I became its owner.

Also, this is such a remote place, -100 miles from schools, - it was just during summers that the whole family spent there. Dad had to be there all the time, but commuted the 100 miles back and forth, since we always had a house in town while any of us needed to be in school. With my older siblings being 14, 12 and 10 years older than I, that covered a lot of years and the annual relocation provided much contrast and excitement in itself!

Families who did live on their ranches full time simply sent their children to boarding school. It was probably more economical to maintain two homes back in those days, plus I doubt that my parents would've preferred to be separated from their young children for months on end.

But those summers out there were most memorable to me growing up, though there were some great memories of the remainders of each of those years when we lived in Del Rio, as well. I haven't begun to touch on all the facets of life at the ranch but I also must write about Del Rio back then. It's a unique little city.

You're right. I need to write a book but hardly know where to begin! 81 years of my own life just seem an extension of the lives of my parents who were born in 1890 and 1892 in Indiana! How they came to Texas is a story in itself and it's essential and inseparable background to my own story. I've covered lots of parts of it all in hubs and on my website, but it does need to be brought together. It may "take a better man than I, Gunga Din", though! One day at a time, right? ;-)


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 3 years ago from California

Thank you so much for sharing this with all of us--such beautiful country and a bit on the wild side! And the smell of lavender and sage--the mornings must be so stunningly beautiful there--


starstream profile image

starstream 3 years ago from Northern California

Your words express such vivid scenes of the surrounding country where you live! I enjoyed the poetry so much too... It is the kind of memory which is taken to heart.. thanks so much.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Audrey. Thank you for visiting my hub and leaving a lovely comment! Oh, yes - it's quite a bit on the wild side, along with being remote. The aromas are simply breathtaking. There's some kind of spicy herbal aroma, especially at dusk, which is unique, too. Mornings are enchanting. My earliest memories include waking up on the screened sleeping porch with the special ambience of the place in my nostrils. But most incredible are the night skies, with the Milky Way actually enclosing one, among the infinite stars above. There's no ground light pollution, so the night extravaganza's only competition is when the moon is so full and bright as to blot out the stars' light. I'm sure that unimpeded night sky is visible in other remote places on Earth, of course, but it seems to belong to the ranch when one is there taking it in.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Starstream - thank you! I just visited your hub site, as I like to do when someone I'd not yet met visits mine. I was delighted with your work and want to read more of it!

While I do own the ranch and have lived there large portions of my time, I don't actually live there now. It's not someplace for a woman alone and it's 500 miles from where I live in Dallas. It is so much a part of me, though, my heart is there more than anywhere else. I'm so glad you enjoyed my poetry, too.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

I always feel rested /rejuvenated after a visit to your gems. I cannot pick out a favourite verse as they all work so well. Voting up Nellieanna and sharing onto my FB page 'A Brand New Dawn'. Have a great day,

Eddy.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Eddy, you're surely one of the most generous visitor to my hubs - and those of others - of any. Thank you, dear Eddy. I like the idea of their being resting and rejuvenating! This hub touches upon some of the dearest things in my life, so I'm especially pleased that you like it!


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

Dearest Nellieanna,

Such vibrant horizons indeed, not only in the panoramic views but those forever imprinted in your mind and memories. Such a splendid wonderment to behold through your stunning photography and heartfelt words.

The vastness of it all is a reminder of just how small we are in terms of the infinite heavens. Your lovely eyes have seen much beauty in this lifetime, especially with such mountains in the horizon ... Thank you for sharing a bit of your remarkable life with us all, and I am in agreement with others, that it surely would be a bestseller of a book!

I truly enjoyed reading this, while the grands are napping! What a lovely escape for me to read your superb writing and enjoy your phenomenal photography and art.

You are certainly a beautiful presence here in HP Town!

Have a lovely rest of the weekend.

Hugs, Faith Reaper


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear, dear Faith - You're absolutely right, that the views and life experiences imprinted in my mind and heart are ever-vivid and memorable. Having the opportunity to share some of it here in our HP community is such a privilege!

One need only stand under that night sky out there with the vastness of the small part of the universe that's visible presenting its incredible beauty and mark of its artist to feel one's own slightness in it all; yet to be given awareness and consciousness as much as we humans have is, in itself, part of that vastness, isn't it?

I know what you mean about reading others' wondrous writings here on HP - and beyond. I just picked up a book of mine on "The Celts", subtitled 'Life, Myth and Art' to absorb the magnificent illustrations and read some of the history of this civilization, which goes way back with the first Celtic phase to 800 BC and in the next 500 years, reaches from the British Isles to encompass vast areas of the lands north and east of Mediterranean borders, with an amazing variety of societies adapted to the ancient conditions & circumstances of each area. My mind vibrates as it looks at ancient history like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, with each so separate from the others, though related as part of our human heritage. The mark of the artist and author is somehow unmistakeable. In today's world of instant communications all over the earth, it's mind-blowing to think of the 'pieces' not even aware of each others' existence, like anthills, each knowing of only their own little hill and its immediate surroundings. Makes one have to consider how little we still know of "it all"!!

Thank you for the very special spirit you bring into my life and so many others;. This weekend is so glorious for many reasons, not the least is the perfect weather we're enjoying, all the more perfect to bring in the first day of the Autumn equinox! It's truly my favorite time of year! I hope it's great where you are, too! Hugs!

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