Will you/would you let your children choose their own religion as they grow older?

It's all in the interpretation

Change is 'the word'  of our times and even those
Change is 'the word' of our times and even those
who stay rezolutely fixed in their opinions are caught up in it more than they would ever realize.
who stay rezolutely fixed in their opinions are caught up in it more than they would ever realize.
We live in an age of unprecendented interconnection that
We live in an age of unprecendented interconnection that
breaks down all geographical and cultural barriers.
breaks down all geographical and cultural barriers.
With this extraordinary expansion of our horizon comes new responsibility - to step outside our comfort zone
With this extraordinary expansion of our horizon comes new responsibility - to step outside our comfort zone
to search outside our traditional faiths and beliefs
to search outside our traditional faiths and beliefs
so we can make right choices that benefit not just ourselves but our children and all future generation.
so we can make right choices that benefit not just ourselves but our children and all future generation.
Many people now make a conscious choice to leave their comfortable inner city businnes behind in favour of simpler, softer, slower life.
Many people now make a conscious choice to leave their comfortable inner city businnes behind in favour of simpler, softer, slower life.
In a land of clear water, unspoiled soil and deeply ingrained - 'live and let live' values, it is easier to understad...
In a land of clear water, unspoiled soil and deeply ingrained - 'live and let live' values, it is easier to understad...
that whatever is your religion, we all need to become more aware and conscious in how we live our lives,
that whatever is your religion, we all need to become more aware and conscious in how we live our lives,
we all need to learn to make the right choices,
we all need to learn to make the right choices,
because to make the world a habitable place for the next generation concern all of us.
because to make the world a habitable place for the next generation concern all of us.
After alll, these are our children and their children, the people we love more than anyone else in the world.
After alll, these are our children and their children, the people we love more than anyone else in the world.
Whatever is your religion or you have none, the materialistic thinking rules our lives.
Whatever is your religion or you have none, the materialistic thinking rules our lives.
There is such a push from private industries and governments alike to buy and consume to improve our lives or for the sake of the economy,
There is such a push from private industries and governments alike to buy and consume to improve our lives or for the sake of the economy,
that we have lost sight of what is really important in our lives.
that we have lost sight of what is really important in our lives.
We forgot what our forebearers taught us: 'You come into the world with nothing
We forgot what our forebearers taught us: 'You come into the world with nothing
 and you leave it for the next one with nothing.'
and you leave it for the next one with nothing.'
What we need, first of all is clear air, water and food.
What we need, first of all is clear air, water and food.
Then comes a safe place to live and a sense of security.
Then comes a safe place to live and a sense of security.
Then comes family and friends.
Then comes family and friends.
These are our needs.
These are our needs.
The rest are wants. As we all know, today, we have few needs, but many, many wants...
The rest are wants. As we all know, today, we have few needs, but many, many wants...
As I write there is a steady drizzle and it is distinctly cold. Winter is here. Many find it depressing. I have no doubt.
As I write there is a steady drizzle and it is distinctly cold. Winter is here. Many find it depressing. I have no doubt.
But I love it and am enraptured by the beauty of the scene, an evening mist that lingers over the water.
But I love it and am enraptured by the beauty of the scene, an evening mist that lingers over the water.
Unfortunatelly, our society suports a very immature mentality when it comes to gratitude.
Unfortunatelly, our society suports a very immature mentality when it comes to gratitude.
As we age we go through a process of thinking about me alone, me and my friends,
As we age we go through a process of thinking about me alone, me and my friends,
 me as a part of family, me as part of society, me as part of the world.
me as a part of family, me as part of society, me as part of the world.
Many of our top paid provessionals encourage the me, alone attitude. Those in the giving, underpaid professions, such as teachers and nurses are not valued.
Many of our top paid provessionals encourage the me, alone attitude. Those in the giving, underpaid professions, such as teachers and nurses are not valued.
My work with students has often highlighted their drive for the career,
My work with students has often highlighted their drive for the career,
and money they want as their main goal in life.
and money they want as their main goal in life.
We live in a society that rewards people for being selfish
We live in a society that rewards people for being selfish
and we are overwhelmed with health, social and ecological dysfunctions,
and we are overwhelmed with health, social and ecological dysfunctions,
we encounter every day.
we encounter every day.
 Religions of the past don't give answers for today.
Religions of the past don't give answers for today.
Nature is my 'church', it enables me to see
Nature is my 'church', it enables me to see
the world in its infinitive possibilities
the world in its infinitive possibilities
.and shades of all colours.
.and shades of all colours.
I want to tell my children: "Whatever is your religion, the one of many...
I want to tell my children: "Whatever is your religion, the one of many...
the one of few..
the one of few..
or none...
or none...
don't see the world in terms of YES or NO
don't see the world in terms of YES or NO
BLACK and WHITE
BLACK and WHITE
DO or DON'T.
DO or DON'T.
Just as Buddhists say:
Just as Buddhists say:
 'The ability to accomplish is all in your mind'.
'The ability to accomplish is all in your mind'.
All love grows slowly.
All love grows slowly.
Living a balanced life requires a long term commitment from oneself: to continuosly monitor, assess, and take actions on your values, beliefs and behaviours as they relate to your goal.
Living a balanced life requires a long term commitment from oneself: to continuosly monitor, assess, and take actions on your values, beliefs and behaviours as they relate to your goal.
Whatever is your religion, or if you have none, exercising wise use and restraint in our consumptive beaviours and making the most logical choices that align with your personal values is part of our personal accountability to this, future generations
Whatever is your religion, or if you have none, exercising wise use and restraint in our consumptive beaviours and making the most logical choices that align with your personal values is part of our personal accountability to this, future generations

The mutual love of parent and child

that profound tenderness

warmth

and security

that the child feels

in your protective arms.


Life is so short,

childhood so brief,

it not only encapsulates

the love we all need,

but just how much better

we are

for receiving it.


You teach your children,

life is like baking a cake.

You have a sprinkle of choice

a dab of fate,

what are you going to make?


Then comes the time

of well-meant advice:

'Never take for granted

all the good things

that are in your life.'

Your child squirms in your arms,

but you continue:

'If you put some hard work,

good things would happen.'


A little salty kiss,

your child starts to cry.

A doctor

hands you

an unwanted

medical result,

cancer,

your youngest one

cannot survive.


A massive storm

in your house,

the roof collapsed,

you know straight away,

if you don't get wet and cold,

you have to build new one.


But there is no reason

as there is no hope,

and things changed

from that day,

everything

that was still and intense,

suddenly stopped.


There is life before

and life after,

you have been told,

your youngest child

never reaches adulthood.


Something inside dies,

you start grieving,

survival instinct saves you,

then comes healing.


You are reaching out,

grabbing on any piece

of advice.


You teach yourself

not to worry

about things

that may

or may not

happen.

Live day by day,

is the best plan.


You begin to suck

the life out

of each day,

appreciate the things

you wouldn't normally

think twice about.

Your elder kids look at you

and ask:

"Why does it happen to our youngest brother?

"How does he, how do we survive?"


You'd your share

of angst

in your life,

now is the time

to be open

with your feeling,

your children have the right

to know.



"Maybe we should pray,"

your daughter closes her eyes,

"Just like Granny used to do."


"To which God?"

Your elder son asks,

"Christian God, our Granny knew,

the Jewish God, our doctor prays to,

the Hindu God, our uncle believes in,

or to the Islamic God, just like our neigbours do?"


"There are hundreds of religions,

not just four,"

You sigh:

"Big, like Christianity

or just small just

the Aboriginal Aranda."


"Are they about angels?"

Your daughter twirls around,

pretending to fly,

"Granny used to tell us

those fairy tales from long time..."


"Some are old,

Hinduism began

about 3000 years ago,

and some are new,

like Mormonism,

and some religion have died

like the Ancient Greeks with their gods,

but all have tried to answer

BIG and DEEP questions."


"What questions?"

Both children looked at you

with their innocent eyes,

and suddenly you feel very small,

how do you explain,

the things you don't know?

Do our lives have any meaning?

How should we live?

Why do people suffer from illness and diseases,

just like their brother does?

Or do we just live and die,

here today and gone tomorrow?

Is this world we live in the only world

there is?


You hugg them tightly

and try your best:

"They are BIG questions

because

they are about everything,

and they are DEEP

because they go right down

to the basis of things."


"Is it true what Granny said,

that only in Christianity is truth?"

Your son asks seriously,

and you just shrug your shoulders:

"You will have to ask yourself

whether

one religion

is better than

or truer

than another."


"Maybe all those religions are the same

and it doesn't matter

to which God we pray,"

your daughter shakes her head

and claps her hands.


"But maybe it does,"

your son stamps his feet,

"we have to find out."


As time passes

slowly

by,

as your son

suffers

by your side,

your religious study

starts.


"About 4000 years ago

the Jewish people

came together.

They were saved

by a leader

called Moses.

God told him

that the Jews

were 'his chosen people.'

and led them to the land,

called Israel."


"We are not Jews,

I don't like that God,

it is not fair,"

your daughter stops to pray.


"Jesus Christ,

your Granny believed in,

lived in Israel as well

and he was a Jew,

am I right, Mum?"

Your son proudly says,

"I have learnt it at my Catholic School."


"His first followers were also Jews,"

You pats his head,

"Later on,

most Christians were non-Jews

living in Europe,

where your Granny was born."


"Was he really a God?"

Your daughter crosses her arms.


" Jesus was a man,

who lived and died

at the age of thirty-three in Israel,

almost 2000 years ago,

but he was also God,

they say."


"And he said

we must love

other people

in the same way

as he loves us,"

your son recites,

then he points at you

with victourous smile:

"But my neighbours say

there is only one God

and that his name is Allah."


"Christians learnt from Muslims

that we depend on God

for everything."

You beckon on your elder children to be quiet

so you can nurse your sick child.

When he fells assleep,

they beg you:

"Tell us more."


"Muhammad was an Arab,

who knew about

of Judaism

and Christians

and when he was forty,

believed,

that God spoke,

directly,

to him,

he called him Allah,"

You add

exhausted,

there is so much

you don't know.


"Uncle told me,

the best way

to know and love God

is doing good works

without expecting

anything

in return."

Your daughter suddenly remembers:

"He prays so much,

maybe he can save him."


"You can not ask for help,

silly,

you have to find your own way,"

your son shouts at her

and she starts to cry:

"I can, I can, I can..."


"Mahatma Gandi was Hindu,

we watched a movie,

do you remember?"

you say

and stand between them:

"True Hindus must be lovers of peace,

look at your youngest brother,

how peacefully he sleeps,

do you want to wake him up?"


They look confused at each other

and look for refuge in your arms.


"There was a Hindu in India,"

you start to tell them a tale

to calm them down:

"When he was twenty-nine

he suddenly became aware

that none of the things we love

can last

for very long,

people get sick,

they suffer,

they die."


"Just like our brother,"

your daughter starts to sob.


"He was so upset

he left his family,

gave up everything

and set out

on a journey

to escape his life

of suffering."


"Did he find it?"

Your son asks.


"He learnt

to stop himself

from wanting

or desiring things,

he became Buddha

and gathered a group

that followed him."


"What has he done to be happy?"

Your son asks again.


"He never hurt anyone,

he always told the truth,

he had also been honest,

never steal anything,

he lived as simply as he could."


"I like that God,"

your daughter says and prays to him.


"The Buddha was an ordinary man,

who found a way of escaping

from the suffering and unhappiness,

never claimed to be God."

You touch her shoulder,

but her eyes are closed

and she doesn't want to hear.


"But the Aboriginals

have been here

for almost 50,000 years

long before the Hindu religion began,

long before the Buddha was born,

long before Jesus Christ lived,"

You tell them.


"They believe,

at the beginning of everything

great Spirit came into the world,

in the form of men and women

and animals and birds,

and made and shaped

everything as it is now."

Your son says proudly,

"We learnt that in Aboriginal Studies."


"For the Aborigine,

the land of his people

is like

the Christian's God,

or the Muslim's Allah,

his whole life

depends on his land.

When an Aborigine dies

his own spirit goes back

into the land

where it came from

and it rejoins

the Spirit of which

it was a part."



You don't really deal

with loved one's death

until you accept

that it happened.


Losing a child

you could not avoid thinking

there was something

you could have done


You face

your youngest son's death

with your other children

at your side.


You mourn together

in the Christian's Church,

in the Jewish Synagog,

in the Muslim Mosque,

in front of the uncle's Hindu shrine

and under the Eucalyptus tree...


"His spirit goes back into the land,

where it came from,"

your daughter says

and your son touches gently

the red soil under his feet.



For all of you

the quest

for religion

became

the important part

of your life

.

Your children

keep growing

and searching

for the answers

to the BIG and DEEP

questions

and you pray

for any religion

or none,

to provide them

with a map for living,

to bring them

peace of mind.






















More by this Author


Comments 71 comments

moonlake profile image

moonlake 4 years ago from America

Beautiful. It doesn't matter what religion you are we're all God's children. We are even if we have no religion. All will be explained to us one day, why some die young and some don't. The worst thing there is in life is losing a child. He was your gift from God for just a short time.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you, dear moonlake, will pass your sincere and beautiful words, it is not my own experience, but of someone very close to me:)


Amanda Gee profile image

Amanda Gee 4 years ago from Cameron, Missouri

I couldn't imagine losing my daughter. Ever! She's my world and I love her immensly! My aunt lost a child 25 years ago, and still mourns from time to time. No matter how much my daughter and I fight I never want to lose my baby girl.


Jackwms profile image

Jackwms 4 years ago

If you raise and educate your children to think, analyze, and question, you won't have a choice about them choosing their own religion. What you have laid out here about the different religions is excellent and something every maturing child should be exposed to.

Good hub


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you, Amanda, for your response, my Grandmum lost her son, my uncle, very early and it was my first experience with 'the religion-giving-you-hope-and-helping-you-to-overcome-grief.'

Yes, Jack, we should whatever is our religion and even if we are atheists.

Thank you, my fellow hubbers for your kind responses:)


always exploring profile image

always exploring 4 years ago from Southern Illinois

This is so beautiful. There is only one God and he loves us all. I believe he honors all religions, it's the heart that matters. Thank you..


hirundine profile image

hirundine 4 years ago from Nelson, B.C. Canada

Beata,

The idea of "god" is entirely and only, in the human realm. While we can find the earliest galaxy in our universe and the higgs-bosun particle. Nobody can show another, any god.

The human race is working off of personality, as defined by Meyer-Briggs and instinct. The ones who have figured out? There is no god? Are the ones prepared to profit from it. Setting themselves up as priests and their ilk. Then, they play their games of sending the fervent; to go forth and do their work, of intolerance and false piety; for profit. With those terms of "god's house" etc. Tithing, for "god's work", etc. That, they then determine. Much more profitable. Than letting people find that god, for themselves.

Whether, or not, I believe in a god? Is irrelevant. The idea that we should be telling our children, which religion to follow? Is abhorrent. What is more to the point. We should be giving our children as they grow, love and understanding. As well, the ability to pass that on to the next generation.

The karmic wheel grinds on ....


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 4 years ago from New York

Beautifully written and beautiful pictures added. "that whatever is your religion, we all need to become more aware and conscious in how we live our lives," that phrase says it all....so many thoughts here to live by. This is very interesting.

Voted up and awesome.


kj force profile image

kj force 4 years ago from Florida

Beata Stasak..beautifully written and thought provoking hub...we all need to find our way in this world and believe in what comforts us...we as parents give the foundation and hopefully our children take it from there...


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you, my fellow hubbers, for your poignant comments, ever since human beings began, they seem to have had religions, just as they seem to have been interested in art, if religions are relevant today is another question, however, I strongly believe all religions are the important parts of our human heritage that we are bound to share with our future generations. As you said, dear hirundine, if we believe in God or not, is irrelevant and yet it is a part of parcel of the past we need to pass with love and understanding and responsibility for our future:)


Thelma Alberts profile image

Thelma Alberts 4 years ago from Germany

Awesome. For me, there is only one God. It can be Christian, Buddhist, Jew, Muslim or whoever as long as He brings only good to mankind. Losing a child is a very hard thing that happen to the parents.

I will respect my child who chooses his own religion. I just hope that changing his religion will not make him bad and fanatic. Thanks for sharing.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

Agree with you, Thelma, although not religious in a conservative way myself, I find your response very reasonable:) Thank you for stopping by and hopefully I hear from you again:)


bravewarrior profile image

bravewarrior 4 years ago from Central Florida

Beata, first I'd like to say, I hope those who read you take the time to experience the depths of your soul from which your write. Your pictorials speak another view from which you write. You are not opinionated, but open to the questions of your heart and they come forth in posts such as this. You have an amazing style and are very deep.

I'm saddend by the prompting of your hub, but have warmth in my heart in you're acceptance; that is seen when one reads to the right of your words.

My son's father and I were both raised Catholic, but find contradictions in the "rules of the religion". We never had our son baptised. We did, however, introduce God/Higher Power to him. I wanted him to make his own choice when he was old enough to do so. I consider myself spiritual, not religious. I'm glad we made the decision to leave the decision up to my son. His father died when he was 15. My son is now 20. When he was 18 he found a church he loved and asked his pastor to baptise him. To me, that is the epitome of acceptance. It was not forced upon him. His dad and I introduced him to God. It was his choice whether or not to accept and, if he did, his choice as to the church where he felt like family.

We made the right choice. He now wants to become a youth counselor and until he persues that, if he does, he counsels those in need on a daily basis. I'm very proud of him!


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

What a great story, 'bravewarrior', I am so honoured you shared your life experience and your wisdom with me:) You have made a great decision in giving your son 'hope' in the time of need and he grabbed it with both hands when his time come to look for something...There is no right or wrong way, the most of it is 'grey' especially in theological questions and people who are adamant that their opinion is the best and force it on others are the ones who live in 'dark':) The most of us don't know and keep seeking and keep looking...for me, the writing is the way to seek, inside and outside of me for the answers...but usually I end up just with more questions....like everyone else:)


bravewarrior profile image

bravewarrior 4 years ago from Central Florida

Beata, I prefer having my quiet, personal relationship with God. I don't go to church, but I talk to Him often. I have an idea for a hub that relates to this subject. Thanx for listening!


Tyasin profile image

Tyasin 4 years ago from NY

Beautiful Hub!

I am not religious, but spiritual and will share the idea of universal spirituality with my children. However, if they decide to follow a particular religion I will not deter or discourage them, as we all must follow our own path.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you dear 'bravewarrior' for your reply, it is a great starting point for an interesting hub:)

Thank you 'Tyasin' for stopping by, happy you liked my hub and looking forward to hear from you again:)


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA

I enjoyed your beautiful words from the heart! I teach my children that organized religion isn't what is important and tell them about different views so they will one day be able to decide for themselves.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

Happy to inspire you, my dear fellow hubber, there is nothing more I could have done and your kind response makes me enourmously grateful for such beautiful fellow hubbers I meet everyday, here, on hubpages:)


Nyamache profile image

Nyamache 4 years ago from Kenya

When it comes to religion every person has a right to have his own choice. I have my view that it works with faith. Parents should not force their children to follow a particular religion but they can guide them to make their own decisions.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

Very wisely and precisely said, Nyamache, thank you:)


Jeani Nugent profile image

Jeani Nugent 4 years ago from Cumberland, Wisconsin

This hub instantly caught my attention as it is something I seem to be discussing a lot lately. I am very active in my church (Methodist), and my daugther loves going to church. I think for both of us we like that this is one place were people are just kind to each other, if even for just an hour.

Both my sister and best friend explore several different types of religion and I love listening to them tell of all the things they learn. Its fascinating to me to learn what guides others spiritually. Its interesting to me how similar they all are and yet how upset some people get when that is pointed out.

My daugther has several friends who are Native American and she has been fortunate enough to be invited to join them for several celebrations and cermonies. She loves learning about their culture and what they believe in.

My parents have traveled to South Korea several times and we have been lucky enough to have South Korean students come and visit us several times during the month of January while on school break. While many are Christians some practice other religions. While in Korea my parents were invited to visit a Buddist Temple and meet with the Monks and Preists (I believe that was the titles, if not please forgive me). It was ane experience they treasure to this day.

I have often said I am glad my daugther has so many people around her with different beliefs to teach her the positives of them all. It saddens me that something that is suppose to be used for good, peace and guidance causes so much anger and disputes.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

So true, Jeani, so true, wishing that every child would have such experiences just like your daughter, maybe it would be good for many parents too...:)


CyberShelley profile image

CyberShelley 4 years ago

This was truly so very beautiful and I write this with tears in my eyes and my heart reaching out to that family.

I would have let my child choose, but I sent him to a Catholic School, although we are Methodist. I truly believe that if you are a good, kind and generous in your spirit, even in the dark when no one is looking, whatever God is up there, will know and welcome you. Up, beautiful and awesome.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

CyberShelley, thank you so much for taking your time to stop by and for writing such beautiful and encouraging message, all the best my hub friend:)


Laura in Denver profile image

Laura in Denver 4 years ago from Aurora

Yery, very touching, thank you!


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you for stopping my, Laura:)


Trish303 profile image

Trish303 4 years ago from Springfield, MO

Wonderful hub! I do let my kids pick what they want to believe, I tell them what I believe and what there father believes, but there choice is there own to make.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you, Trish, happy you stopped by and even happier you liked my reflection on beliefs:)


ThisisShe profile image

ThisisShe 4 years ago

This is an incredible and beautiful way to address this topic - simply beautiful. It almost brought me to tears.

To answer the question - yes, I do plan on allowing my daughter to make this and many significant decisions in her life on her own. I will, of course, provide her with the tools to help her decide, but leave the ultimate decision to her. I left Catholicism by choice when I was very young and decided to learn about as many religions as possible to find one that suited me best. I have yet to find it. Her father, on the other hand, is very religious. When he was a child, he was planning on joining the priesthood (He is Russian Orthodox). Still, he agreed to allow her to make that choice herself, which I am so happy about.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

thank you my new fellow hubber for connecting with me and sharing your life story, it is not easy decision to make but it is the right one, I am very happy to hear when deeply religious parents let their children to choose their own path...it is the best gift they can give them:)


Borsia profile image

Borsia 4 years ago from Currently, Philippines

My parents never tried to sway us in one direction or the other. They never spoke ill of religions or gods, though they were atheist I never knew it as a youngster.

I asked my father, who is the most genuine person I have ever known, and he said that beliefs are something that we all must form on our own. Weigh every argument, test every story, explore all that you can.

But remember that in the end an intelligent person must believe what they can believe not what the want to believe.

You will never really believe something that you can't believe. No religion, profit or priest can make you believe that red is blue, that up is really down or that something exists that is not there.

I never had children, my choice, but if I had I would tell them exactly what my father told me.

You will believe what you can believe and nobody can change your mind.

The loss of a child is something that most of us refuse to even ponder but sadly some must endure, made even harder when you must try to make sense of it to other children too young to understand.


drpastorcarlotta profile image

drpastorcarlotta 4 years ago from BREAKOUT MINISTRIES, INC. KC

I believe in God, the son Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit. The loss of a child is a hurting thing to bare. But I have experience when you have a deep relationship with the Lord, the hurt seems more bareable. As far as teaching my child religion, I just plant a seed and from there she has to make her decision herself. GREAT HUB! Voted-Up! God Bless you!!


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you, my dear fellow hubbers for visiting me and sharing your genuine experience and beliefs with me, yes, Borsia, we believe what we want and can believe, but sometimes our beliefs are tested and we need to have an open mind and let them to be tested and reshaped, this is how we grow and learn:)


forbcrin profile image

forbcrin 4 years ago from Michigan

"Will you/would you let your children choose their own religion as they grow older?"

Interesting. I have always entertained this idea. The reason for which religion is not working as it should these days, is the way kids are indoctrinated in it before they can understand what religion means.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

thank you for your interesting input, my fellow hubber, a lot of truth in it:) Happy you stop by and looking forward to hear from you again...


Doc Snow profile image

Doc Snow 4 years ago from Atlanta metropolitan area, GA, USA

One of my college roommates used to boast that he didn't need the crutch of religion. Of course, he hadn't done much walking yet...

Now, I'm a Unitarian Universalist. We teach our kids about all the major religious traditions, as well as our own. It's an article of--should I use the word "faith?"--with us that each individual must reach their own answers about the "BIG and DEEP questions." The role of our religious community is, in part, to support each individual's quest.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

that is a great journey for your own discovery, you are supporting each other, like pilgrims on their path to religious truth and yet each of you have to find their own true way to get there....


Doc Snow profile image

Doc Snow 4 years ago from Atlanta metropolitan area, GA, USA

Yes, exactly!

(Although there is also a social justice aspect to our tradition--for example, 2 UUs, James Reeb and Viola Liuzzo, were murdered during the civil rights struggle in the 60s for working to make sure all citizen's civil rights were protected. But that part is not as relevant to the present Hub. I only mention it to give a slightly more complete picture.)


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

It is greatly appreciated, have a great day my fellow hubber...everything that is worth of pondering about is complicated, everything concerning humans, because we are complicated bunch:)


DDE profile image

DDE 4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

It is up to my child on choosing his religion definitely an eye opener great hub voted up!!!


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 4 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you for stopping by again and happy your stay was worthwhile:)


Tonu1973 profile image

Tonu1973 3 years ago from the outer reaches of reality

Your words are beautiful and your message is strong...


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you, Tonu for your kind words, we always tend to be more passionate about topics we strongly believe in:)


ixwa profile image

ixwa 3 years ago

My brother-in-law's parents did not baptize him and never suggested nor took him to any church. He said they wanted him to make his own choice when he grew up. Up to the point he came to grips with his religious awareness and church-going habits, he was collecting all sorts of crosses and hanging them in a wall he chose in his house. He decided to become Catholic, and has been going to church to be prepared for baptism. He is 40 years now.

My first born, a boy, only lived for two days after he was born, and the doctors said he had no heart, and it its place there were only veins. They said that this is a case that is one in a million. During the last day of his first day, he had begun to turn Blue, and in the midnight hours of his second day, passed. I did have another son who looks exactly like him(now living and is 20 years old), and when he was a baby we used to show him his brothers' pictures, which I had fortunately taken of him with a same-time Polaroid Camera- and every time he saw that picture, he would always say: "That's Me!" Life is still a huge mystery we still need to learn more of. I think my son as a baby was right, It was 'him', the one I lost and who tore my life and soul-and now he came back, same boy I lost, but a new one.... My present grown up boy, very sweet and 'cool' has healed me multiple times in my life-time. I still think and would like to learn and write more about Reincarnation. I have dedicated my whole being to him. I have what we call "Mtundu" (African Alter) in the corner of my bedroom where I converse, palaver and meet up with my ancestors - I have taught him about that and he talks to them, too. I have taken him to church and shown him the church(I did this with a coupla churches) and left it up to him to choose what he wants to do. His mother had him baptized when he was a baby, I did not object, and she did not object when I taught him our ways of accessing our ancestors. It is up to him what does he want to do. I have worked him to get three or four BA's so that he can have a very broader choice and outlook about life. We are working hard together, and he has his own life, but has a more tighter bond with me and his mother. Like I said, I did not want to give such a long-winded answer, but, Life has even deeper mysteries we need to unlock and maybe getting to understand that is part of the reason why we are here on Planet earth hurtling into Space, the Universe and sucked up by the Dark Matter out there.. Great poem and excellent and relevant pictures you have along with it.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you my fellow hubber for your genuine and beautifully sad and yet so inspiring story:) This is the one of the reasons I love to share my observations on life and death and everything between, because I am rewarded by so many heartfelt and inspiring stories...that for a few minutes I feel connected to a fellow hubber who I have never met and never known and suddenly I feel very close to....that is 'miracle of life' for me:) Thank you and all the best with your living, loving and hubbing....


Renee Collins 3 years ago

I loved this. I am not extremely religious. I believe there is a God, I believe there is heaven and hell and that prayer helps but not always in the way we want, but that is the extent of my religious beliefs. If my children chose their own religions I'd be very supportive I like to think.


everymom profile image

everymom 3 years ago from Massachusetts

I loved your piece. I think having to endure the death of a child is the worst fate any parent can face; I feel for the person close to you who had this experience (I, too, know many people who have had to endure this, including my maternal grandmother with the death of my mother's younger sister in a car accident). Your writing style is so poignant, bittersweet but it allows a reader to gain a measure of peace. Thank you!


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you, my fellow hubbers for your kind and genuine responses, we all have our own bittersweet experiences and our own individual beliefs, but if we manage to open our eyes and hearts to people around us...we become fully human:) Wish you all the best with your living, loving and hubbing and looking forward to hear from you again:)


cam8510 profile image

cam8510 3 years ago from Columbus, Georgia until the end of November 2016.

Wow, what a surprise that was. I was sort of expecting, well, the kind of thing I might write on this subject. Thank you for the fresh and honest approach.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you, cam, we all have different opinions and different beliefs, but for me it doesn't matter what you or don't you believe in...what matters is 'who you are' and 'who you want your children want to be'...:) all the best to your wherever you are and good luck with living, loving and believing...B


Funom Makama 3 profile image

Funom Makama 3 3 years ago from Europe

This is simply beyond words.... Very beautiful.. By the way, I love these lines

"There is life before

and life after,

you have been told,

your youngest child

never reaches adulthood."


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you, my fellow hubber for your kind comment and all the best with your hubbing:)


ignugent17 profile image

ignugent17 3 years ago from Central Illinois , USA

Wonderful and interesting poem. :-)


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you, my fellow hubber for finding time to stop by and leaving such a kind comment:) B


Mary Merriment profile image

Mary Merriment 3 years ago from Boise area, Idaho

I believe there are many paths to the same destination. To the disappointment of my family, I left the family religion and wandered through many religious ideals searching for something that was right for me. I am so glad I have done this and found a path of peace for myself. I have shared all that I have learned about these religions with my child and have let her also choose her own path. I appreciate and thank you for sharing your wide variety of knowledge through this Hub.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

Happy Mary that you stopped by and found something useful in my reflection on religions and us:) I can feel your kind soul in your gentle searching words and feel your peace, it makes me happy, I have found my contentment as well....


Asp52 profile image

Asp52 3 years ago from England

Really enjoyable article, please keep up the good work. I hope my children will choose a spiritual path that is right for them, if they decide to be an Atheist I will accept that also. I look forward to debates with them both when they are older.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

Your children are very lucky to have a parent, just like you:) Thank you for sharing your opinion on this topic, that is not so easy for some people to discuss or even to ponder about:) All the best with your living, loving and believing...and of course hubbing:)


rajan jolly profile image

rajan jolly 3 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

There is one God and these religions that followed from these prophets are different ways to reach a common goal we call God.

Your poem is excellent and a must read for every child.

Voted up and beautiful.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you, rajan, happy you find my poem worthy of reading, all the best my fellow hubber:) B


justmesuzanne profile image

justmesuzanne 3 years ago from Texas

All paths lead to God and all people have the right to choose the path which best suit them. Voted up and beautiful! :)


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

thank you so much for your wonderful comment and all the best:) B


SMonaghan119 profile image

SMonaghan119 3 years ago from PA

well written, genuine, emotional, and touching. Well done.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you, my fellow hubber for your kind comment and all the best:) B


Elderberry Arts profile image

Elderberry Arts 3 years ago from Surrey, Uk

Definitely. They are free to chose whichever religion they wish or none at all.


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

I agree with you, my fellow hubber and thank you for stopping by:)


SallyTX profile image

SallyTX 3 years ago from Only In Texas!

Lovely poetry and photos! Yes, people should be free to follow their own spiritual path! Voted up and awesome! ;D


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you Sally for you king comment and happy you agree with me:)...B


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you Sally for you king comment and happy you agree with me:)...B


Beata Stasak profile image

Beata Stasak 3 years ago from Western Australia Author

Thank you Sally for you king comment and happy you agree with me:)...B

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