Creative Writing Prompts for Jungle Stories

Writer's Block

How to Beat Writer's Block

Jungle Writer's Prompts

Stories of the jungle are some of the most entertaining stories that have been written over the years. From the writings of Rudyard Kippling (Jungle Book, Gunga DIn) to films like The African Queen and Jumanji, they have provided us with some of the best entertainment we have ever had.

It's just as easy, though, for a writer of jungle stories to get stuck in a creative dead zone as it is for all sorts of other creative writers. In this article, I am offering you some writer's prompts that are geared to someone that would want to write a story based in a jungle setting. Read them, and then mull them over. Hopefully they will help you get unstuck.


  1. As you sit beneath a tall tree, you hear a rattling. You look up to see a large snake. You look at it. It looks at you. All of a sudden, it talks to you in a voice that sounds very much like a cross between hissing and actual words. Did you hear right? Is it actually talking? Describe the encounter.
  2. You are a jungle native, aged 13. In your tribe, it is a rite of passage that all youths, on their thirteenth birthday, should jump from the top of a waterfall into the river that runs through the heart of the jungle. Now it is your turn. Describe the experience.
  3. You are an anthropologist that came to this jungle in search of a mythical flower that supposedly has the power to help people communicate with their deceased loved ones. Tell whether you found it and describe both it and the experience of looking for it.
  4. You are a serial killer that came to the jungle so that you can enjoy killing at random without being caught. Write about your life.
  5. You are the Interpol agent after the serial killer mentioned above. Write about the hunt and tell whether you are successful or not.
  6. You came here to escape the city. Write about what prompted you to come here.
  7. You are a young lion hunting for a mate. Write about you courtship efforts with the young lionesses.
  8. You are a fashion designer that came here searching for inspiration. Describe the experience.
  9. You are a rare and exotic bird that makes its nest high in a tree. You are aware of your beauty, and have become quite proud, even haughty. Write about how this becomes your undoing.
  10. You are a real estate developer that has come to knock down the jungle and replace it with a resort for the wealthy. Some of the natives are trying to stop you. Who wins?
  11. Describe the various characters that live in the local tribe.
  12. You are a missionary that has come here to convert the natives to your religion. Describe your efforts.
  13. You heard that there is a hidden diamond mine deep in the jungle. You have come here looking for treasure. Do you find it? What obstacles did you encounter along the way?
  14. You are an animal scientist that went deep into the jungle to study a rare species of elephant. You became so enthralled by your studies that you did not realize the passage of time. When you return to civilization, you find that thirty years have passed and you didn't even know it. What do you do?
  15. You are Eve, just come to life in the garden of Eden. God just introduced you to Adam for the first time. Describe that meeting.
  16. The fruit trees have all suffered from some kind of blight. There is no fruit this year, and all of the native people and animals are in danger of starving. Make up a solution to your problem and describe the journey to that solution.

These are but a few ideas that I am putting forward to help you through your block. I hope you can create some wonderful stories by using them.

Rick DellaRatta and Jazz for Peace


Your Jungle Spot

If your intended genre is jungle related, consider getting deeper into the tropical mood by making a jungle spot in your writing space. Her are a few suggestions:

  1. Get jungle art. This could be anything from a print of the Amazon to a model of King Kong that can sit on your desk while you write. Allow yourself to be taken away in your imagination to the places these things represent.

  2. Get a potted palm and drink Pina Coladas or coconut soda while you work. Imagine that you are in a makeshift bar in the middle of nowhere, and the bartender has lots of storied to tell you about the locals.

  3. Use wicker furniture and have a big hand-held fan available for hot days.

  4. Get a faux tiger or zebra throw for your floor or chair. When you look at it, imagine that you got it on safari, and make up stories of the hunt.

  5. Add a globe and a compass to your décor.

The idea of adding things to your environment that remind you of the place that you are trying to create is an important one. If you choose to use this technique, don’t just add them and forget about them. Instead, look at them often. Touch them. See yourself in the jungle while they are created. This can be a powerful technique for breaking a jungle writer’s block.

By John Rea Neill [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
By John Rea Neill [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons | Source
By Robert Armitage Sterndale [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
By Robert Armitage Sterndale [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

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Comments 4 comments

Theresa Franklin profile image

Theresa Franklin 2 years ago from Hemphill, TX

These prompts are good. Although #2 is a little scary.

Kenneth Avery 2 years ago


A friendship is forming and me, being an old loyalist, promise you that your following me will NEVER go unnoticed.

Thank you.


purpleveil profile image

purpleveil 2 years ago from Vineland,NJ Author

Thank you. I will do that.

kenneth avery profile image

kenneth avery 2 years ago from Hamilton, Alabama

Hi, purpleveil,

Great hub. Voted up and away. The best prompt challenge for me is No. 1. I can identify with that one. I enjoyed your hub. Very helpful and interesting.

I urge you to visit my place and read a couple of my hubs and then be one of my followers.

I would love that.

Kenneth/ from northwest Alabama

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