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Too many repetitive words.

  1. Deborah Judges profile image59
    Deborah Judgesposted 2 years ago

    I have a page  I'm working on and it's a really in depth conversation between a psychologist and her patient and it's written in third person. I keep having to say" the psychologist said" "the psychologist warned" 'the psychologist told her" how can I get all those extra "psychologists" out of that portion of the page?  I have to have the interaction between her and her client. and I have to keep the main character in third person. Any ideas?

    1. AshtonFirefly profile image83
      AshtonFireflyposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      I of course have no read your writing, so I can't be sure of this, but here's a suggestion: I find that when I am reading, simply the paragraphing tells me who is speaking. For example.

      She said, "....."

      This person said, "...."

      followed by:



      Even if you don't attribute the dialogue to a particular person, the reader will be able to follow simply by the spacing. Of course, in a lengthy dialogue this may be problematic. However, you can intermittently insert a "the psychologist said" or "the patient said" in order to clarify. All this, of course, depends on your style.

  2. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 2 years ago

    If you use the name the client calls the psychologist (Dr Smith, Robert, Dr Bob etc) the repetition will not stick out to readers.

  3. Deborah Judges profile image59
    Deborah Judgesposted 2 years ago

    Ashtonfirefly, great ideas! Thanks so much!

  4. R.S. Hutchinson profile image85
    R.S. Hutchinsonposted 2 years ago

    Having not read it.. here's a stab in the dark...

    "My thoughts were interrupted by her squeamish voice, would she ever just shut-up I wonderd? I tried to-"

    "As your Dr, I want you to kno-"

    "Ugh! Why am i here this lady is going to say I'm nuts. I should just play alo...."

    Dr Smith continued, "..i just want you to know that..."


    With pulsating eyes, the good dr reflected, "i just want you to know that..."


    As if sticking her tongue out at me she dared to speak, "i just want you to know..."


    The Dr praised her...
    Reluctantly she opened up, "when i was 12..."
    "I just want you to know..." was the Dr's first lie.

    I could go on... check out my How to Creative writing series for more tips!