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Haiku #1

  1. DomShadows profile image60
    DomShadowsposted 6 years ago

    A treasure of land
    Hidden among theories
    Of mans different beliefs

    1. Daniel J. Neumann profile image61
      Daniel J. Neumannposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I like the poem, but I'd like to probe you on your intent. Is your poem implying that the philosophic/religious beliefs of man are inspired by their geographic location?

      Keep writing, my friend.

  2. Dame Scribe profile image60
    Dame Scribeposted 6 years ago

    I would think it's saying that irregardless of location, there is a belief of some sort or another going on big_smile great job, DomShadows.

  3. 0
    china manposted 6 years ago

    Remind me again what are the precise rules for haiku ?

    1. Joy56 profile image59
      Joy56posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      can you write it china man

    2. Uninvited Writer profile image84
      Uninvited Writerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      There are actually no set rules. Basically 17 or less syllables.

      1. Sab Oh profile image60
        Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        There are a number of specific 'rules' that developed over time, but as with any art form, they are not necessarily followed. This is especially true in haiku written in English.

        1. 0
          china manposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I will go look it up, I seem to remember that it must be three lines with a certain amount of syllables in each. Like a sonnet there must be flexibility but the if the basic form is bent too much it becomes something else I would say.

          1. Sab Oh profile image60
            Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            The basic form is three lines following a 5-7-5 syllable pattern. Technically, there should also be a reference to nature or the seasons, and there should be a 'turn' where the grammatical structure shifts somewhere within the haiku.

            1. 0
              china manposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Yep - and the turn normally comes at the end of a line.  and apparently the originals always included a word that referenced the season of the poem - I like that idea

  4. Sab Oh profile image60
    Sab Ohposted 6 years ago

    Glad to see more haiku-ing going on 'round here!

  5. Pearldiver profile image86
    Pearldiverposted 6 years ago

    Friends, Romans, Countrymen
    Lend me your ears
    They are wasted here!

    lol

    1. Uninvited Writer profile image84
      Uninvited Writerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      lol

    2. 0
      china manposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Ignoring the fact that the first line has too many syllables, not a big issue - the second and third lines also do not have enough syllables and there is no turn at the end of a line - It might  be better as :

      Friends, Romans, Countrymen
      Lend me your ears because er
      They are wasted here!

      although this is not any great improvement big_smile

 
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