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Your vs. You're

  1. nlowman profile image60
    nlowmanposted 6 years ago

    Does anyone even use "you're" anymore? Do people know what it means? All over hubpages and every where, all I see is "your." Always. What the heck is going on here!?! I'm having an aneurysm here.

    http://www.collider.com/uploads/imageGallery/Lewis_Black/lewis_black_image.jpg

    1. leeberttea profile image60
      leebertteaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      How about ur? That's the latest spelling.

      1. daniel0365 profile image60
        daniel0365posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        "ur" is a jejemon spelling! lol

  2. lrohner profile image85
    lrohnerposted 6 years ago

    I dont know. Its puzzling to me. Your probably right in what your saying, but their isnt a lot to loose if you dont know punctuation and grammar.

    smile

    1. nlowman profile image60
      nlowmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Hahahaha. Love it!

      I also realized that I used "every where" instead of "everywhere," and now that is only making my headache worse!

      1. Lily Rose profile image83
        Lily Roseposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        lol lol

      2. lrohner profile image85
        lrohnerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Here u go--just 4 u:


        http://i28.tinypic.com/1zuis.png

        1. nlowman profile image60
          nlowmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Thanks! I might have taken too many....

          http://www.looptvandfilm.com/blog/lewis_black.jpg

  3. Lily Rose profile image83
    Lily Roseposted 6 years ago

    I see it constantly, too, and it drives me nuts!  How about to vs. too?  One of my pet peeves...

    1. nlowman profile image60
      nlowmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Almost as bad as their, there and they're...

      1. Lily Rose profile image83
        Lily Roseposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        You know, I took my daughter out of her preschool and moved her to another at the beginning of last year because her teacher didn't know the difference between their and there! 

        I know that's not something that my then 4 year old would be taught, but I could not handle that a teacher - a young one at that who had recently completed schooling - did not know when to use 'their'...and it was not just one isolated incident, it was over and over again!  Not acceptable to me...

        1. nlowman profile image60
          nlowmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I think that's a valid concern. If one is an educator, one should have a grasp of the English language and grammar, even if one is "only" educating preschoolers. I would be concerned as well.

  4. wavegirl22 profile image45
    wavegirl22posted 6 years ago

    What is even scarier is that both have been replaced with "ur"

    I guess you can blame texting for that one!

    1. Ron Montgomery profile image60
      Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      OMG! U R rit

      1. wavegirl22 profile image45
        wavegirl22posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        yeah baby ..

        it must almost b time 3 football if Ron has his helmut back on smile

        1. Ron Montgomery profile image60
          Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Ready to rumblllllllllllllllllllllllllllllle..

      2. kmackey32 profile image82
        kmackey32posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        OMFG Ron, thats funny... lol

    2. nlowman profile image60
      nlowmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Wat do u mean? txt is g8. wink

  5. Mighty Mom profile image91
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Thx 4 brngng this up. IDK about uthrs, but wrng grammer rilly mks me mad.
    Whn I see the wrng they're their it mks me loose it bigtme.

    1. Lisa HW profile image82
      Lisa HWposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      How about the old "loose/lose", "allot", and the ever-famous, "her and I" (as in "Fred bought pizza for her and I")...

  6. Beth100 profile image83
    Beth100posted 6 years ago

    OM! WITH is going on? ICAM but trying to figure it out is a WOMBAT.  W@ is worse 4 me is the 2x -ve.  "I ain't got nothing blah blah blah".  (say it 2 d tune of Kee$ha smile  )  Or this one:  "I gotta get blah blah blah"  (2 d tune of Usher!  FOMCLOL)  lol

  7. Lisa HW profile image82
    Lisa HWposted 6 years ago

    This issue (and the "they're"/"their"/"there" thing) comes up over and over again on writing sites.  I think I can explain some of the instances of this common and apparent failure to know the difference between words like that:

    I've been more than aware of the correct use and spelling of those words since I was - like - in third grade; and yet, somewhere in some of my writing, it's very likely I've used the wrong word somewhere along the way. 

    What happens with me (and I'm guessing I can't be alone) is that I'm typing what I'm "hearing" as I think what I'm writing.  It doesn't help that I "think in my Boston accent", as well as speak with it.  So, if I'm typing 100 words per minute and writing at a similar speed, those words often sound the same in my head.  It doesn't help that spell-checkers don't always pick up those mistakes because the words are technically spelled correctly.  The grammar-checker may pick them up, but grammar-checkers can pick up so many things that aren't really errors at all, it's easy to miss some of the "marked" areas in the typing.

    So, to anyone who thinks they're "so smart" and that everyone who makes those kinds of errors are "so stupid".......


    http://i741.photobucket.com/albums/xx59/itsaishah/GIF/F5gzZXxCHqjjk5agmlFO1LLAo1_400.gif

    lol  lol      and that goes for anyone who has any remarks about not proofreading carefully enough too!

    1. kephrira profile image60
      kephriraposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You're dead right. I know I've made mistakes like these in the past, but it isn't because I don't know the difference, it's just because I can type faster than I can think and sometimes my hands just go off ahead without waiting for my brain to catch up.

      1. Lisa HW profile image82
        Lisa HWposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        kephira   smile   so from now on, we need to get word out to the whole world that if they see that kind of error, instead of judging us, writers, so harshly; they need to think, "Hey - I'd bet this is one heck of amazing typist."   lol

        1. kephrira profile image60
          kephriraposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          lol cool

          1. Lisa HW profile image82
            Lisa HWposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            In all seriousness, I do think there's also the thing that fingers that type "learn" to "be automatic" (but since fingers don't have brains in them, they only seem to digest some things).  It's like when you use a phone number so often your hand just learns it, and then if someone asks you the number your head doesn't remember it because it transferred the knowledge to your phone-dialing fingers.  lol  I've been typing since 1965.  My fingers have a mind of their own at this point.   smile

            1. kephrira profile image60
              kephriraposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              As long as they only have a mind of their own when you're typing you'll be ok, otherwise it could get you into trouble. wink

              I had a kung fu instructor that always went on about 'muscle memory', saying that if you did enough repetitive training, doing the same technique over and over again even though you think you have already perfected it, then if someone attacks you your body will just react automatically without you even thinking about it and perform the technique. I guess the same thing is true for typing.

  8. WryLilt profile image86
    WryLiltposted 6 years ago

    http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q245/calala_red/your3.jpg

  9. Beth100 profile image83
    Beth100posted 6 years ago

    Typing errors and grammitical errors happen to everyone.  I avoid the conjugated errors by not writing with conjugated words.  I was taught at an early age that when one writes, it is not correct to use conjugated words in pieces of writing unless it is to reflect the informality of the piece.  Conjugated words are more for speaking, though I rarely speak using conjugated words. 

    There are rules for writing and I had to study these and know these like the back of my hand when I was young.  I still follow the majority of the rules, but many have become antiquitated with new slang, such as texting abbreviations and acronyms. 

    No one is perfect and no one will write the perfect piece.  If you see an error, you have three choices.  First, accept it as an error and let it go.  Second, leave a respectful comment regarding the error and the solution for correcting it.  Third, stop reading and leave the article.

    1. Lisa HW profile image82
      Lisa HWposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Sometimes writers can't win, because if we write in a fairly formal way there's often more than a few people to point out that it's "too formal for the Internet".    I go back and forth, depending on what I'm writing; but a month or so ago I actually had someone "respectfully ask" who my "target audience" was because my Hub "seemed to be aimed at professors".   lol  S/he then asked if I was a professor.   (Oopsie.  My target audience was school kids, and I wrote it as if I were speaking to my own kids.   lol  )

      1. Beth100 profile image83
        Beth100posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        lol  I know what you mean.  I have received email from some -- can you write without being so serious?  Can you write without the humor?  It is impossible to satisfy all the readers, so I write mainly for myself.  lol

  10. profile image0
    ralwusposted 6 years ago

    grammer Nazi.

  11. KateKarmin profile image61
    KateKarminposted 6 years ago

    That is unacceptable by all standards! I wonder how that teacher managed to get appointed! You did right.

  12. rebekahELLE profile image91
    rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago

    I think it's all Twitter birds fault.

    http://www.higheredmorning.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/twitter-grammar.jpg

    one that makes me crazy is when someone spells quiet like QUITE OR when people leave off the ending of words when speaking.   "we're goin swimmin..."

  13. Daniel Carter profile image91
    Daniel Carterposted 6 years ago

    Another set of words in the list of not understanding how to use properly are
    "affect" and "effect." And honestly, I can't quite get this one accurately in my head, so I usually try to find other language usage to get around it. So I admit my weakness on this one. Anyone have a good way to remember how to use these two correctly?

    I'm also surprised to see how often people don't know how to use "well" and "good" in their/there/they're writings....Also "then" and "than"...and so the list grows.

    txting iz EZer.

    wink

    1. timorous profile image91
      timorousposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Yes...affect and effect are a bit tricky.

      Basically, 'affect' is a purposeful quality something has or is given (sometimes a false one..i.e. 'affectation'). For instance: "The colours in that painting are used to good affect", or "It shouldn't affect the outcome".

      Whereas, 'effect' has 2 or 3 meanings.  It usually refers to the result of some action being taken, as in "It didn't have the intended effect", or "Something to that effect".  It's also used to refer to one's possessions, i.e. personal effects.

      Hope that's just a wee bit clearer neutral

      1. profile image61
        allisonaaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        in short, "affect is usually a verb meaning "to influence." effect is usually a noun meaning "result." effect can also be a verb meaning "to bring about."

        page 126
        "a writer's reference"
        4th edition
        diane hacker

        style manuals--if you write for a reason, much less a profession, there isn't  even one that you shouldn't own.....

    2. nlowman profile image60
      nlowmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      As in, "You did good"? Hahaha. Yes, I've noticed the two you mention too.

      A big part of the problem is the educational system, unfortunately. I didn't fully learn grammar until college, and only because I signed up for a specific course. It was not a requirement. In elementary, middle and high school, some grammar was touched upon, but not nearly in the depth it should have been. Many of these problems could be alleviated, at least a bit, had we learned more. So much for edu-ma-cation....

  14. sunforged profile image65
    sunforgedposted 6 years ago

    I often type to/too your/you're and there/their errors.

    I have some kind of mental disconnect when using a keyboard - I would never make those same errors with a pen and paper.

    Sorry for the headaches.. I imagine I hate typing equally as much as you dislike reading grammar errors. Writing online is the only time I ever composed directly with a keyboard. In the past all my writing was done freehand and only a final copy was typed.


    I actually received hate mail once for frequently using your instead of you're - but you must understand my dumb little fingers cant push shift and reach over to find those punctuation points and they also don't move as fast as I mentally compose.


    Sorry if I didn't respond to your hate mail smile

    1. nlowman profile image60
      nlowmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Hahaha. I don't think I would ever send hate mail!

      We're all guilty of it at one time or another, I'm sure. Some of us (those more "well-trained" in grammar especially), just get more grumpy about it.

      At least you have a happy disposition about the whole thing.

      What is most frustrating to me, really, is the type of person who acts very "holier-than-thou," but has a post or hub littered with incorrect usages.

  15. wilderness profile image95
    wildernessposted 6 years ago

    Well, I think yore all nuts: your thinking of the days of you're when it was all the same.  Nowadays people think there way is right; everyone can sit in they're chair wherever their at and write there own way.

  16. lovebuglena profile image91
    lovebuglenaposted 6 years ago

    In the world of twitter, facebook and texting many people use u r or ur to mean you're. It's done to save time and to be cool. But I think those that misuse your and you're either don't realize they are doing it or simply have no idea what each one means lol.

    Lena

    1. Lisa HW profile image82
      Lisa HWposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      "ur"/"ur" (or, for those us with Boston accents, "yor") versus "your"/"you're" is a choice, a preference, and a way to abbreviate.  Some people don't like to see it, but it's done on purpose.

      "Your" verus "you're" is just plain a mistake - typing, grammar, or otherwise.

      Abbreviating too much isn't good either, though.  Not long ago a friend sent me a text, asking a "yes"/"no" question.  I couldn't be bothered typing back more than a "y".   He saw the one letter and thought I'd just messed up in trying to reply.  There's still something to be said for good, old, good grammar.

 
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