Great West African Poems 2

Great West African Poems 2

GREAT WEST AFRICAN POEMS 2
The notes that follow poems are designed to help in the extraction of the meaning of poems and in the appreciation of the technique of the poets.
The general pattern of the notes should be clearly understood. The first line-by-line explanations are those of difficult words or words used in a sense special to the poem; these are followed by interpretations of meaning and comments on the technique of the poetric expression.
Here are some poems from Wole Soyinka, Birago Diop, Kwesi Brew and J.P Clark

Wole Soyinka: He was born in 1934 at Abeokuta, Nigeria. He studied in University of Ibadan and at Leeds University, England where he graduated in English Language and Literature. The SEASON is one of his many poems.

SEASON
Rust is ripeness, rust,
And the wilted corn-plume
Pollen is mating-time when swallows
Weave a dance
Of feathered arrows
Thread corn-stalks in winged
Streaks of light. And we love to hear
Spliced phrases of the wind, to hear
Rasps in the field, where corn-leaves
Pierce like bamboo slivers
Now, garnerers we,
Awaiting rust on tassels, draw
Long shadows from the dusk, wreathe
The thatch in woods-smoke. Laden stalks
Ride the germ's decay- we await
The promise of the rust

Birago Diop: He was born in 1906 at Dakar, Senegal. He was educated in Senegal and in France where in qualifed in veterinary surgeon. VANITY is one of his many poems he used in expressing the presence of the ancestor.

VANITY
If we tell, gently, gently
All that we shall one day have to tell,
Who then will hear our voices without laughter,
Sad complaining voices of beggars
Who indeed will hear them without laughter?
If we roughly of our torments
Ever increasing from the start of things
What eyes will watch our large mouths
Shaped by the laughter of big children
What eyes will watch our large mouth?
What hearts will listen to our clamouring?
What ear to our pitiful anger
Which grows in us like a tumour
In the black depth of our plaintive throats?
When our Dead comes with their Dead
When they have spoken to us in their clamsy voices;
Just as our ears were deaf
To their cries, to their wild appeals
Just as our ears were deaf
They have left on the earth their cries,
In the air, on the water, where they have traced their signs
For us blind deaf and unworthy Sons
Who see nothing of what they have made
In the air, on the water, where they have traced their signs
And since we did not understand the dead
Since we have never listen to their cries
If we weep, gently, gently
If we cry roughly to our torments
What heart will listen to our clamouring,
What ear to our sobbing hearts?


KWESI BREW: He was born in 1928 at Cape Coast, Ghana, was orphaned at an early age. He had his studies in Ghana. THE MESH is a love poem.

THE MESH
We have come to the cross-roads
And I must either leave or come with you
I lingered over the choice
But in the darkness of my doubt
You lifted the lamp of love
And I saw in your face
The road that I should take

J.P CLARK: John Pepper Clark was born at Delta, Nigeria in 1935. He studied in the university of Ibadan. He is a graduate of English Literature. STREAMSIDE EXCHANGE is a poem about the future put in the simple frame work of childhood anxiety.

STREAMSIDE EXCHANGE
Child:    River bird, river bird
    Sitting all day long
    On the hook over grass
    River bird, river bird,
    Sing to me a song
    Of all that pass
    And say,
    Will mother come back today?
Bird:    You cannot know
    And should not bother;
    Tide and market come and go
    And so shall your mother.

        
       




Gladys Casely Hayford

Comments 25 comments

MUBARAK 5 years ago

I want the analysis of the poem vanity. please help.


Daniel Macaulay 5 years ago

Its a long time I did this, 20 yrs ago but from what I can remember, Its about us the living not heeding to the voices of ancestors. It goes beyond that to emphasise on us leaving our culture to embrace the lifestyle and culture of the west.

In trying to adopt the lifestyle and civilisation of the west, we have become beggars which depicts our current existence in africa today.

He uses a lot of imagery to describe our clamouring from not heeding to the voice of ancestors not to take up the culture of the west.

We see nothing of what they have made, i.e. we have no value of their achievements, their lifestyle etc which we have given up on.

Pretty much, the poem is on this sort of mood. Us the living coming to realise one day that, we should have listen to our ancestors i.e. "their cries" meaning warnings to stick to our traditional values etc. By not doing this, we will live to regret it one day... i.e. All that we shall one day have to tell...

I hope this helps.


kalmax 5 years ago

what are the themes, figures of speech,paraphrase. Of the poem streamside exchange


Betty 4 years ago

You are yet to answer the question of Kalmax 4months ago. Please I am interested.


DOREEN SAKU 4 years ago

I want to appreciate poem the Mesh.


Hafsat Garus 4 years ago

i nid the devices and themes of streamside exchange. asap pliz


Mbah Judith 4 years ago

Please I need an indeph analyses of d poems,,THE MESH AND STREAM SIDE EXCHANGE...THANKS!


Mbah Judith 4 years ago

Please I need an indepth analyses of d poems,,THE MESH AND STREAM SIDE EXCHANGE...THANKS!


q-diamond 4 years ago

Please answer kalmax question 6 months ago, its very important.


Victory 4 years ago

Pls oh i need the analysis of streamside exchange right now. Abeg


Lanre 4 years ago

Could you please give a detail analysis of the poem Streamside Exchange? Very important


Tofunmi Dentof profile image

Tofunmi Dentof 4 years ago

could you please discuss the theme of powerlessness in streamside exchange


JOEY. Anzaku 3 years ago

I wrote short stories and poetry for publication and for sale. Though I am a creative writer in all the genres of literature and, have written so far four works on literature[ still with publishers, to be out next month.] I also does editing job in all the genres of literature and does analysis on poems, plays, novels, short story that made reference to contemporary issues. Get me on [joeywhyalwaysme@yahoo.com Thanks.


FEMI-WILLIAMS 3 years ago

I love African poetry!!


Sophyhun 3 years ago

What is the poem analysis of Vanity by Birago Diop


Agu Chiamaka 3 years ago

pls I need the summary, poetic devices and the structure of the poem, vanity


bensuvia@gmail 2 years ago

pls I need the summary, poetic devices and the structure of the poem, vanity


olaseni sabina 23 months ago

Pls l need the themes and the language, vanity.


michael 20 months ago

why is it that you don't answer questions that are been asked on an issues. all the question asked u by people have not been answered why? poetic device, structures of the poem stream side exchange and its theme


Oladejo bolanle 19 months ago

pls i nid d themes nd d language vanity


samsonjoseph8760@yahoo.com 15 months ago

please i need all summary device found in ''the mesh'' by Kwesi Brew. thanks


iwelumo francesca 14 months ago

i want the poem from Birago diop on Africa, my africa


erahbor precious 14 months ago

i think if u people need answers to your questions kindly check it in google and if u don't get ur answer from here kindly ask from an adult who knows it or ask from a literature teacher or go and buy the books u wil find ur answers their...thank you.


erahbor precious 14 months ago

i think if u people need answers to your questions kindly check it in google and if u don't get ur answer from here kindly ask from an adult who knows it or ask from a literature teacher or go and buy the books u wil find ur answers their...thank you.


Owoyele Oluropo 13 months ago

Add Your Comment..My Africa,is not written by Birago Diop but by David Diop

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working