Beautiful Victorian Gardens

Victorian Garden Maze

This labyrinthine maze, in the Doris Waters Harris Lichtenstein Victorian Garden, is so fun.  Located at the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis.
This labyrinthine maze, in the Doris Waters Harris Lichtenstein Victorian Garden, is so fun. Located at the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis. | Source

A Beautiful Victorian Herb Garden

You can see here, the fencing element in the front of the picture, and how much it adds to the beauty of the garden.  See the design throughout, and herbs planted within the individual areas.   This herb garden is just off the main Victorian garden.
You can see here, the fencing element in the front of the picture, and how much it adds to the beauty of the garden. See the design throughout, and herbs planted within the individual areas. This herb garden is just off the main Victorian garden. | Source

Victorian Gardens - A Brief History and Introduction

Victorian gardening became very popular during the Victorian Era for a few different reasons. One reason is that there was newer technology at that time than they had previously. Of course, there was more time the middle class had to devote to gardening than before. There was also more access to various kinds of plants, as well as the invention of suburban living. The combination of these variables helped to shape the rise of Victorian gardening, among other things.

One of the new and bigger feats of the time was growing a beautiful lawn, and keeping it well manicured, etc. Just like today, keeping a nice and healthy lawn took a lot of work. During the Victorian Era, it wasn't just one lawn, but two. A front and back lawn for example, were needed to be in place before you would then step into creating a beautiful Victorian garden. I don't know if it was always the case, but I found this bit of information rather interesting to learn. If you think about it, it also really isn't that different than today. Sometimes people barely carve out the time to care well for their lawns. The idea of stepping out into a whole new set of design with flowers, trees and shrubs was a whole other thing. Many were up to attempting the task, however.

So once your lush lawns were in place, the next step was to embellish beyond this point. It basically almost turned into a way to have an indoor parlor, outdoors. For the beautiful Victorian gardens I have seen over the years, they definitely are inviting in this regard. To have some nice lawn furniture outdoors makes it a whole new living space to experience and enjoy.

Lush Victorian Flower Garden and Amazing Maze

Photo Taken of the Doris Waters Harris Lichtenstein Victorian Garden, at Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis, Missouri
Photo Taken of the Doris Waters Harris Lichtenstein Victorian Garden, at Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis, Missouri | Source
Incredibly lush flower garden!  The Victorian Garden in the summer.  It is amazing with all the color and beautiful flowers.
Incredibly lush flower garden! The Victorian Garden in the summer. It is amazing with all the color and beautiful flowers. | Source

Victorian Garden Poll

Do You Like Victorian Gardens?

  • Yes!
  • Sometimes
  • No
  • Some other answer
See results without voting

Greenbrier - West Virginia

Loved the gardens at the Greenbrier in West Virginia.  Lovely examples of Victorian Gardens.
Loved the gardens at the Greenbrier in West Virginia. Lovely examples of Victorian Gardens.

The Basic Core of Victorian Gardening

The most basic way to describe what a Victorian garden entails is to have three basic elements that are used to create an outdoor masterpiece. These three items include the following:

1. Landscape Design - This includes the three basics of lawns, trees and shrubs. Many like to hire landscape designers for this part as it is such a core part of the garden design. Depending on where you live, a landscaper will know exactly what to best suggest for your needs. For me, I would love easy to care for plants and trees. I would prefer those that are native to the area I am in, and also would prefer that it truly benefit wildlife as much or more than it benefits my family. Kind of a tall order, but a landscaper can help with such things.

As you see in the photos, you have some brick paths that are curved, along with some very beautiful borders around the individual sections of flowers. It seems to work out from its center, and is simply stunning. You can easily walk in and amongst the flowers this way, and experience the garden with more of your senses than you might otherwise.

2. Lawn Ornaments and Fencing - I first observed the most beautiful gardens that would fit this description when I went to Charleston South Carolina. The had a Southern flair as well, but they would definitely fit the description of Victorian. They had amazing fences, so often. You could see iron gates surrounding stunning gardens, which were almost ornaments themselves. Even when these gardens were small and on the side of a narrow home, they were lovely to behold.

As for ornaments, these can range from sculptures to different kinds of art, to gazing balls, etc. When I picture the beautiful gardens I have been to, I think less is more, or very carefully chosen pieces, nothing over the top or that makes things look cluttered or too busy. Fountains would make an excellent choice for an ornament as well.

3. Flowers - Of course, flowers are a huge part, if not almost the biggest part of Victorian Gardens. Except for wintertime, I can't even begin to picture a Victorian garden without flowers. That said, however, a sign of a truly well done Victorian garden would be one where the garden maintains its beauty in all seasons, due to the design, etc. Flowers in the spring, summer and fall seasons help to make a Victorian garden the beautiful thing that it is. Below, I share some commonly found flowers in Victorian Gardens.

Curves, Angles and Bright Flowers in a Spring Victorian Garden

I love the sharp angles and also the soft curves that can be seen in Victorian Gardens.  The color of the flowers seems to pop.  Photo taken in Spring.
I love the sharp angles and also the soft curves that can be seen in Victorian Gardens. The color of the flowers seems to pop. Photo taken in Spring. | Source

Flowers to Plant in a Victorian Garden

If I ever were to have my own Victorian garden, I think picking the flowers would be the point at which I would be most looking forward to. Flowers are what come to mind, big showy and gorgeous flowers, when I think of Victorian gardens. Below I share some of the flowers that would fit well into a Victorian garden.

Some good choices for flowers in your garden could include zebra mallow, flowering tobacco, penstemon, catchfly, double knock out roses, English daisies, and pink flower carpet rose.

Other good flowers are sweat peas, Rodgersia, heliotrope, zinnias, marigolds, salvia, tansy and primroses.

As for herbs that would fit in well, some could be lavender, oregano and dill. Some have used different kinds of sage as well, even multiple kinds in decorative pots, that would help to dress up even the corners of the garden with a real touch of class.

Curved Pathways, and Garden Sculpture Make a Beautiful Victorian Garden

Source

I love gardens and always have, but there is something that seems extra special about Victorian gardens. It would be a dream to have my own Victorian garden one day. Until then, I am very content seeing the beauty of other's gardens.

As for the gardens pictured here, one of the very special things are the Victorian Buildings nearby. If you look closely in the photos, you can see some of them or parts of them.

Would you ever like to have your own Victorian Garden?

  • Yes
  • Maybe
  • No
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© 2014 Paula

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Comments 8 comments

Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada.

Such a beautiful hub with your lovely photos to enhance it. I can sure see how important it is to add enhancements to the gardens, such as statuary, curves, fencing, gorgeous flowers and bright colors. You make me long for a big yard of my own so I can have a rose garden, herb garden, flower garden, small shrubs for hedges, a maze, a gazebo ....


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 2 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hello Phyllis, when I see gardens like these, they make me feel the same way! If money were no object, and if there was all the time in the world, imagine what we could do! It would be so amazing to have a maze and gazebo, etc. A hammock, off in the corner wouldn't be too bad either! Thanks so much for stopping by, reading and leaving a comment. I really appreciate it.


tirelesstraveler profile image

tirelesstraveler 2 years ago from California

Delightful stroll through this lovely garden. Well done.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 2 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hello Tireless Traveler, thank you very much for your kind words and visit to my hub! Have a great day.


The Examiner-1 profile image

The Examiner-1 2 years ago

The photos were beautiful and the description was very tempting but I doubt that I could ever afford to make one - and upkeep it. :-( My favorites are the mazes.

You did a good job on writing this and placing the photos which you took.

Kevin


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 2 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hi Kevin, I hear what you are saying about the cost that could go into a Victorian garden, and then considering the upkeep also! I totally agree. Just the cost of the mass plantings of flowers would be something to really think over. Thank you for stopping by and commenting.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

Your photos are beautiful, oceansnsunsets! I would love to have a Victorian garden like the ones that you describe, but I doubt that I would have time to take care of it properly. It would be fun to try creating a small one, though!


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 2 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hello Alicia, I am so glad you stopped by, and I agree with you about loving to have a Victorian garden of my own! I think they do take some time, but if you have it and don't mind it or use it for exercise, etc, then the pay off is just great! I don't see anything wrong with starting small and going from there. My time is short sometimes, but I am currently focusing on a couple of smaller gardens that are easier to maintain. This year it is a butterfly garden and a small herb garden. Thank you for your kind words and visit and comment here.

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