A Few Facts About Bamboo Garden Plants

Image Credit: Ecolect.net
Image Credit: Ecolect.net

A Few Facts About The Bamboo Garden Plants In Your Garden

You move into a new home and you find that in the back yard in the middle of where the garden would go there is a bunch of bamboo plants. You didn't plant them, they were already there. It grows a lot, like a weed!

You may have heard there are some interesting things about bamboo plants, but what are they? What is so special about bamboo – or is it really “special” at all?

Read on to learn a few interesting facts about bamboo, like it's impact on the environment, learning that there is different types of bamboo and more.

Basic Interesting Facts About Bamboo Garden Plants

What is bamboo? Well to put it in simple terms, bamboo... whether it's what's growing in your garden, or a lovely decoration on your table top, bamboo is the largest type of grass there is. Yes, funny isn't it? Bamboo is a grass. Bamboo stalks are normally round, and have periodic joints. (Some types of bamboo have squarish stalks – but very few.)

The bamboo stalks can be solid or hollow. Some types are thorny, and some types die after they bare fruit. Others do not flower at all until they are reach almost thirty years of age. Some bamboos are evergreens, others are deciduous, this means the bamboo will lose it's leaves when the weather gets colder. The most common type is called Bambusa arundinacea. It is your average “garden variety” of bamboo garden plants.

Jack And The...Bamboo Plant?

How much do you think your bamboo will grow? Well, that does depend on the kind of bamboo you have. Some people think that bamboo will only grow a few inches, and some expect their new table top plant the bought as the mall to take over their yard and grow hundreds of feet high within a few months.

Some people plant bamboo garden plants in your garden, then they wonder why the bamboo garden plant doesn't grow that much. For the first few years, it barely grows at all. However, after that, look out! Bamboo plants in a garden can grow many feet taller in just a year, and up to 100 feet in height!

My Bamboo drawing from last year...
My Bamboo drawing from last year...

The Ultimate Renewable Resource: Bamboo Garden Plants

Because bamboo plants grow so fast and renew themselves so quickly bamboo has very little if no impact on the environment, in fact it's better for the environment then regular wood because it grows so fast. While nurseries have bamboo plants, (especially the little decorative ones for a desktop table or your windowsill) no one needs to worry about running out of bamboo because it grows so quickly. With a bamboo's awesome root system, it “replants” itself and expands it's own area as it grows.

Have you ever tried to remove bamboo plant from your garden? Because of its extensive root system, removing it can be close to impossible. Bamboo branches of under the ground from it's roots then sprouts up new stalks from the same bamboo plant, meaning you can't remove just one, and bamboo will dominate the area very quickly.

Bamboo Garden Plants... Are Actually are GOOD for the Enviroment?

Because bamboo is so healthy for our planet, more products are being made from bamboo. Products made from the same kind of plant that's in your garden. Bamboo can be made into all kinds of everyday things that so many of us use. Some are predictable, like window blinds, paintbrushes, and cutting boards, cooking utensils, some streamers,organization boxes and dividers.

Others are more of a surprise, like knitting needles, yarn, fabric (even for bed sheets!) and clothing, like hiking socks. When so many products are now available made out of bamboo, “buying bamboo” is an ecxelent way to help preserve our resources on this earth!

HubChallenge: Hub#19 Only 81 more to go! Day 14.

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Levertis Steele profile image

Levertis Steele 4 years ago from Southern Clime

This information is quite interesting. I have used bamboo for decoration, and many years ago, my dad used it to make whistles for us children. I was wondering if there is a variety that produces edible shoots or leaves.

Thanks for sharing!

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